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  • Grave Peril

  • The Dresden Files, Book 3
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 11 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,077
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 18,231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,154

Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden has had a rough couple of weeks. As the only openly practicing professional wizard in the Chicago area, he has squared off against a multitude of supernatural bad guys. Harry has won the day against demons, poltergeists, sorcerers, trolls, vampires, werewolves, and even an evil faerie godmother. You might think nothing could spook him. You would be wrong.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Spike makes good

  • By Lakejewel on 03-22-10

You need to read this series

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

If you don't, then..you know..you're a doody brain or something.

With 16 books to review in this series and not a SINGLE negative thing to say, everyone should read this book and the entire series.

Also, James Marsters is the best. Download today and get yourself some ear-love.

  • Fool Moon

  • The Dresden Files, Book 2
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,025
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,970
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,916

Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden is Chicago's only openly practicing wizard. He is also dead broke. His vast knowledge and magical skills are unfortunately matched by his talent for making powerful enemies and alienating friends. With little more than his integrity left, he accepts an offer of work from Lt. Karin Murphy of Chicago's Special Investigations Unit. He wants to redeem himself in Murphy's eyes and make enough money to quiet his rumbling stomach.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best books I've read in a long time!

  • By David Ziegler on 05-06-10

A Werewolf in Lond--er, Pari--er, Chicago?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

Well I'll be. Also, detective wizards, talking skulls, motorcycle gangs, rivalries between the local PD and the FBI...

what's not to love?

  • Summer Knight

  • The Dresden Files, Book 4
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,314
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16,887
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,826

The Winter Queen of Faerie has manipulated Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden into accepting a case to solve a murder and stop a war between the courts of Summer and Winter that could have literally earth shattering consequences. His own soul is up for grabs. Dresden must dig deep to discover that at time a willingness to accept a little help from your friends, be they a cub pack of werewolves, old loves in sheep's clothing, or a battalion of pizza loving dewdrop fairies, is a very good thing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Harry & James are one.

  • By Michael on 10-28-10

This series is a keeper

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I can't say it enough. This series isn't just good, it's amazing. If fantasy is your thing, you'll love it. If mysteries are your thing, you'll also love it. If you are a human and your heart is pumping iron-based blood, and your lungs are sucking in an oxygen-based gas, you'll also love it.

  • Snow Crash

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 17 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14,527
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,124
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11,214

Neal Stephenson is a blazing new force on the sci-fi scene. With the groundbreaking cyberpunk novel Snow Crash, he has "vaulted onto the literary stage." It weaves virtual reality, Sumerian myth, and just about everything in between with a cool, hip cybersensibility - in short, it is the gigathriller of the information age.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Stephenson

  • By A. Tuck on 10-16-08

A thinking person's story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

This is the kind of story you have to think on; and one where thinking on it will lead you to realization and conclusions long after the book has been read.

Which may not be for some, but in my opinion is the hallmark of a good story, especially a good science-fiction one.

Imagine a world where the government has handed over all power to corporations (already scarily real, eh?) and pretty much everything is privately owned--right down to the roads you drive on (think tolls are a pain in the back side now?). The whole of America pretty much functions like feudal city-states, but ya know, with futuristic technology.

Now, imagine some unscrupulous individuals take the idea that the brain is really basically an incredibly sophisticated computer to an extreme. Now imagine it turns out that idea isn't new at all, but as old as humanity itself...

  • The End is Nigh

  • The Apocalypse Triptych
  • By: John Joseph Adams, Hugh Howey, Scott Sigler
  • Narrated by: Mur Lafferty, Rajan Khanna, Kate Baker, and others
  • Length: 15 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 466
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 434
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 434

Famine. Death. War. Pestilence. These are the harbingers of the biblical apocalypse, of the End of the World. In science fiction, the end is triggered by less figurative means: nuclear holocaust, biological warfare/pandemic, ecological disaster, or cosmological cataclysm. But before any catastrophe, there are people who see it coming. During, there are heroes who fight against it. And after, there are the survivors who persevere and try to rebuild. THE APOCALYPSE TRIPTYCH will tell their stories. Edited by acclaimed anthologist John Joseph Adams and bestselling author Hugh Howey, THE APOCALYPSE TRIPTYCH is a series of three anthologies of apocalyptic fiction. THE END IS NIGH focuses on life before the apocalypse. THE END IS NOW turns its attention to life during the apocalypse. And THE END HAS COME focuses on life after the apocalypse.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing, couldn't put it down!

  • By Jon on 05-14-14

A collection of stories about the impending doom

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

This book is a collection of short stories, so it's hard to really give it an overall review that will be accurate to each individual story.

However, nearly every single one of the stories therein is a fresh new look at how the world will end. Even the stories that deal with the "usual suspects" like massive natural disasters or biological warfare almost always manage to take a different approach or new spin that I hadn't quite scene before. And yet, even in those stories that did take a very "been there done that" approach, the story was always told from the point of view of someone generally not considered in mainstream story telling.

All in all, a definite keeper.

  • Death Masks

  • The Dresden Files, Book 5
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 11 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 18,327
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16,024
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15,944

Harry Dresden, Chicago's only practicing professional wizard, should be happy that business is pretty good for a change. But he also knows that whenever things are going good, the only way left for them to go is bad. Way bad. Recent examples: A duel with the lethal champion of the Red Court, who must kill Harry to end the war between vampires and wizards...Hit men using Harry for target practice...The missing Shroud of Turin - and the possible involvement of Chicago's most feared mob boss.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Series Really Gets Into Gear

  • By Alan on 01-03-10

I can't listen fast enough. 24 isn't enough hrs...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I don't know what else to say except YES, the series is THAT GOOD. I can't comment a whole lot in individual books, because ALL of them are written with the same high caliber that Butcher puts into them, and they are ALL narrated at the same high caliber that Marsters reads them.

So the only thing left to say about individual books would have to do with the story, which, I can't say much on without giving away, except to say that there is a mystery, Dresden kicks back sides, and his array of sidekicks are so much more than just sidekicks.

  • Water for Elephants

  • By: Sara Gruen
  • Narrated by: David LeDoux, John Randolph Jones
  • Length: 11 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,182
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,265

Why we think it’s a great listen: Some books are meant to be read; others are meant to be heard – Water for Elephants falls into the second group, and is one of the best examples we have of how a powerful performance enhances a great story. Nonagenarian Jacob Jankowski reflects back on his wild and wondrous days with a circus. It's the Depression Era and Jacob, finding himself parentless and penniless, joins the Benzini Brothers Most Spectacular Show on Earth.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Rosie the bull elephant?

  • By Randall on 07-22-07

Not my usual kind of reading, but glad I did

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

A very enlightening, powerful, and emotion-filled story of life in a traveling circus through 1920s depression-era America.

The book is told from the point of view of the main character, but from alternating points in his life, to an amazingly, deeply poignant effect.

The two narrators, LeDoux and Jones, do an amazing job seamlessly tag-teaming the story as it flows from time to time, and also do an utterly profound job of keeping in line with the character himself. It is 100% believable and natural to an eerie degree just how much LeDoux and Jones are BOTH the same character, with the same personality--but with just enough difference as is believable by the events we learn he goes through.

Not only did Gruen write easily one of the best stories ever told, but the narrators did it the justice it deserve. This whole production was stellar, literally a masterpiece.

0 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Borrowed World

  • A Novel of Post-Apocalyptic Collapse, Volume 1
  • By: Franklin Horton
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,531
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,280
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,269

In a night of devastating terror, ISIS operatives have unleashed a coordinated attack on America's infrastructure. With thousands of trapped travelers and scarce law enforcement, the miles between Jim Powell and his family become a brutal gauntlet where the rules of civilized society no longer apply. As Jim puts his years of preparation and planning to the test, he is forced to ask himself if he has what it takes to make it home. Does he have the strength - the brutality - required to meet this new world toe-to-toe?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Close and personal story of the apocalypse

  • By Kingsley on 07-25-15

I couldn't do it. Couldn't get past ch. 5

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I just..I'm sorry I can't. As a storyteller myself I always try to give the benefit of the doubt and be gracious and generous in my critiques, but I just can't with this one.

To be fair, I only got through chapter 5 or so (I think it was) before I had to turn it off to do something better--anything really--with my time. So the story itself, in it's concept, could be a good one. I don't know.

But I couldn't get past the writing and the attitude of the main character (whose point of view the book is written from). But in just those first few chapters alone, it became clear to me that this was a doomsday prepper fantasy. The terrorists finally attack, and the main character, by virtue of being good at prepping for disaster, becomes a hero.

If you're into that, great. I personally am not.

Now, I might have given it a chance, as I have learned to be open minded in my consumption of media and literature, and allow new and even opposing opinions into my brain to rattle around, inform me of the world, and give a wider perspective.

Except once again, the attitude of the main character completely turned me off to the point it wasn't worth my time. As someone who isn't silly enough to be terrified by every brown person with an Arabic name, the fact that the bad guys are all one color and the good guys are very much all another color, I couldn't get past it. As someone who also takes the time to learn my female co-workers names and CALL THEM by their names, I couldn't get past the fact that the writing repeatedly says "John did this, Bob did that, Joe did this, and *the women* did that." Yes, literally. Men were individuals, women were a collective.

Maybe, just maybe, Horton was purposely writing a character who was a walking sphincter with the aim for him to grow into a full-fledged person by the end of the book, but my good faith had already been stretched too thin by that point.

Read at your own risk. Maybe I'm wrong.

  • The Ophiuchi Hotline

  • By: John Varley
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 119
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 121

The invaders came in 2050...they did not kill anyone outright. They said they came on behalf of the intelligent species of Earth - dolphins and whales. The invaders quietly destroyed every evidence of technology, then peacefully departed, leaving behind plowed ground and sprouting seeds. In the next two years, 10 billion humans starved to death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good Sci-Fi

  • By Kelli on 08-25-10

An odd one.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I have a really hard time explaining this book without giving things away. Let's just say it's a wild, crazy, and often confusing ride into the future, with accidental time travel. Also, whales are smarter than us.

But not in the satirical, Douglas Adams' dolphins' thanks-for-all-the-fish kind of way, but in a "I decided to do LCD, peote, bath salts, and a bottle of moonshine" kind of way.

It's just. Odd. Hence, I'm giving it a middle-ground rating. It had really good parts, and really makes one think about certain aspects of life and futility of society, but also...really really weird. Sort of in an Asminov, Bladerunner kind of way...except...not as approachable? I dunno. Like I said, this ones hard to pin down without spoiling a lot.

Also, lots of sex scenes. But involving people who have...experimented with their own anatomies. Not mutants though. Or at least, not mutants the way we usually think of them?

All I can say is if you don't have any other books you're excited over or pressing matters to attend to, this could be an interesting experimental listening. Otherwise, save it for when the mood for something completely unexpected but NOT the Spanish Inquisition strikes you.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories

  • By: H. P. Lovecraft
  • Narrated by: William Roberts
  • Length: 4 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,232
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,028
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,030

At the heart of these stories, as with all the best of Lovecraft’s work, is the belief that the Earth was once inhabited by powerful and evil gods, just waiting for the chance to recolonise their planet. Cthulhu is one such god, lurking deep beneath the sea until called into being by cult followers who – like all humans – know not what they do.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very atmospheric and creepy

  • By Kirsten M. Crippen on 10-30-11

Great classic stories, but honest caveats below

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

I love cosmic horror, so obviously all things Cthulu-mythos are a guilty pleasure, Lovecraft included.

If you came across this book, you either knowingly got here, were sent here because you also have a penchant for cosmic horror, or are curious about the genre.

If you are part of the latter two categories (or even if you just go here by accident), then let me say if you like psychological horror, then you will love cosmic horror, this book included. Lovecraft is the master of saying just enough to get your own imagination to do the terrorizing for him.

But I do feel the need to warn you. Lovecraft was definitely ahead of the times, but unfortunately in some ways he wasn't. Such as his attitudes and word choices regarding women and minorities.

Luckily I have not found this to be a problem in cosmic horror genre as a whole, but as someone who got into the cosmic horror genre from a contemporary standpoint and then backtracked to Lovecraft, I was admittedly disappointed by the language choices and attitudes he sometimes shares in his writings.

However, if you can overlook that, his works are amazing.