LISTENER

Thomas Taylor

  • 2
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 3
  • ratings
  • How Not to Get Shot

  • And Other Advice from White People
  • By: D. L. Hughley, Doug Moe
  • Narrated by: D. L. Hughley
  • Length: 3 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,038
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 913
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 905

From the elections of Barack Obama and Donald Trump to the tragic events of Ferguson and Charlottesville, the subject of race has come to the forefront of American consciousness. Legendary satirist D. L. Hughley offers his own cutting observations on this contentious issue that continues to traumatize the nation, a wound made more painful by the ongoing comments and actions of the 45th president. Hughley uses humor to draw attention to injustice, sardonically offering advice on a number of lessons, like "How to make cops feel more comfortable while they're handcuffing you".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • D.L. Hughley keeps me "woke"!

  • By Mcmlviii on 08-21-18

Humerous but REAL!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-18

The irony of being black in America...this book is a good read for those who can separate the comedy, sarcasm and humor and get the underlying message. well put together.

  • Where Do We Go From Here

  • From A Call to Conscience
  • By: Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Narrated by: Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Length: 1 hr and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 61
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 60

Where Do We Go From Here is a selection from A Call to Conscience, a milestone collection of Dr. King's most influential and best-known speeches. Presented here with an introduction written and read by Senator Edward M. Kennedy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • powerful

  • By Demetrius on 01-31-18

Monumental...King is TIMELESS!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-17

MLK chronicles the undying willingness of the black man in America and tools and social strategies to eliminate injustice.