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  • 62
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  • 69
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  • Differently Morphous

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,805
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,601
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,589

A magical serial killer is on the loose, and gelatinous, otherworldly creatures are infesting the English countryside. Which is making life for the Ministry of Occultism difficult, because magic is supposed to be their best kept secret. After centuries in the shadows, the Ministry is forced to unmask, exposing the country's magical history - and magical citizens - to a brave new world of social media, government scrutiny, and public relations.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not for everybody

  • By R. MCRACKAN on 09-24-18

Something quite different

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-20-18

Second Croshaw book I've read. These are a unique mix of light-hearted hijinks, social satire, and dramatic fantasy/sci-fi. Part Terry Pratchett and Douglas Adams, part... well, any number of competent sci-fi/fantasy writers.
There's a lot of intelligence here.
Croshaw certainly nailed the times we live in!

  • The God Who Is There, 30th Anniversary Edition

  • By: Francis A. Schaeffer
  • Narrated by: John Lescault
  • Length: 7 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 65

For decades, The God Who Is There has been the landmark book that changed the way the church sees the world. In Francis Schaeffer's remarkable analysis, we learn where the clashing ideas about God, science, history, and art came from and where they are going. This edition includes a foreword by James W. Sire that places Schaeffer's seminal work in the context of the intellectual turbulence of the early 21st century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Relevant,Loving God

  • By Miss Dixon, Amazon Customer on 06-09-17

Still relevant.... Maybe more than ever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-18

Great read. A bit of background in philosophy and western civilization helpful. Reader is pretty robotic, so a new production by someone who is mentally engaged in the content would be great. Still, the reading didn't ruin it. You get used to it after a few hours.

  • Dusty's Diary

  • By: Bobby Adair
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 317
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 310
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 307

I played all those cool video games. I watched all those movies. I even read the books. In most of 'em, the hero shoots the bad guys, drives a sweet car, never gets hungry, and always seems to get laid by the end. Yeah. Whatever. I gotta be straight with you about why I wrote this journal, and it comes down to one thing, the apocalypse kinda sucks. It doesn’t meet my expectations at all.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great read!

  • By Samantha Lowe on 08-14-18

Could have been much more, but very entertaining

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-02-18

First, Ray Porter is out of this world in this one. He's usually very good, but this book seemed to have been written for him. I thought at first that he was reading Dusty too angry, but it became clear that he was spot on.
Speaking of... I haven't read Adair before, so I don't know how much of this is the Dusty character and how much of it is author's thought channeled through the character. What's clear: the character is so, so angry and bitter. Eaten up with class envy. Not only poorly educated, but at times so utterly uninformed of how the world actually works. How can you be struggling for survival and not grasp the most basic implications of scarcity? (For example, why some guys make a ton more money "pushing numbers around a screen." If there are a million people with skillset A and only a few hundred with skillset B, the ones with skillset B are going to be harder to get and will cost employers more... which equals getting paid more. It's not rocket science.)

Dusty does a whole lot of societal analysis, some of it insightful, much of it just bitter and ignorant. Some of the topics he reflects on, I know enough about to know he is extremely uninformed or misinformed... which makes me wonder if he knows what he's talking about on any of the other topics. (The references to McDonald's food, for example.... so completely not how it is.) So in much of the story I couldn't decide if the author is angry, ignorant, and bitterly envious, or if he meant to show that society had utterly failed to give Dusty a basic education... or something else entirely.

Mixed between the stupid stuff, though, Dusty nails a few things. What if we did all put more energy into noticing what we have in common instead of focusing so much on our differences of opinion?

The story could have been much better by dialing down the repetitive, simplistic socio-political ranting (and it is ranting... of the very creatively expletive-laced form) and just having more stuff *happen.* When things are happening, the tale is riveting.

  • Legion: The Many Lives of Stephen Leeds

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 10 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,254
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,095
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,089

Stephen Leeds is perfectly sane. It's his hallucinations who are mad. A genius of unrivaled aptitude, Stephen can learn any new skill, vocation, or art in a matter of hours. However, to contain all of this, his mind creates hallucinatory people - Stephen calls them aspects - to hold and manifest the information. Wherever he goes, he is joined by a team of imaginary experts to give advice, interpretation, and explanation. He uses them to solve problems...for a price. Then a company hires him to recover stolen property - a camera that can allegedly take pictures of the past....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Audiobook content list

  • By Logan on 11-13-18

Part 3 really pulled me in

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-18

First two were a bit weaker than what I'm used to getting from Sanderson. But they are necessary for the power of the third.
I didn't really find the stories particularly funny, but occasionally amusing. The set of three is definitely a credit well spent.
Reader is very good. Probably only Ray Porter could have done as well or better.

  • Skyward

  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Suzy Jackson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8,542
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,115
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8,103

From Brandon Sanderson, the number one New York Times best-selling author of the Reckoners series, Words of Radiance, and the internationally best-selling Mistborn series, comes the first book in an epic new series about a girl who dreams of becoming a pilot in a dangerous world at war for humanity's future.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • If you like Ender's Game or Sanderson check it out

  • By Kingsley on 11-08-18

Another amazing experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-27-18

How do so many top notch stories come from the same mind so quickly? Lots of writers do high output, lots do great output; how many do fast, great output?
It will feel like forever waiting for the next installment, yes, but there will probably be two or three other books the same year.
As for this story in particular, it works fine for adults as well as younger readers. Pace is quick, pull is strong, clichés are few and altered in interesting ways.

  • The Deadly Pact

  • A Faded Star, Book 2
  • By: Michael Freeport
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 9 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109

Shifting alliances throw the diplomatic situation into chaos. In this second of a planned five-novel series, you will find out what's happened to the survivors of the expeditionary force, who's manipulating the Alliance, and, finally, what the true motivations of the frightening crabs are. Can Admiral Stokes and his naval commanders prevail against a rapidly shifting tapestry of potential foes?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Mediocre

  • By K. F. on 09-15-17

Nice story. The telling part needs work.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-21-18

The writing is pretty clumsy and the sequence of events shows increasing problems.... which leads to more dissatisfaction with book 1 also. Why would a population stuck on a single planet for 5k years only have 2 ethnic groups? Why would there be any military space force at all after a civil war, presumably fought on the surface of a single planet?

  • A Faded Star, Book 1

  • By: Michael Freeport
  • Narrated by: MacLeod Andrews
  • Length: 10 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 265

A forgotten colony of humans live on a water world circling a tiny, faded star on the edge of the galaxy. The crew of their newest flagship, the Rampart, encounters an alien scout who is being chased by a dangerous foe. The encounter shakes the beliefs held by the people of Lashmere. With the aid of the mysteries of the origin tablet, they discover the true origins of their colony. These may be the last humans in the universe. Can they survive against their ancient enemy? Their only choice is to embrace an unknown past and fight with everything they have.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Strange Performance

  • By James on 06-03-17

The genre is saturated but this story is strong

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-18

There are only so many ways to tell the "future humans in space far from earth struggle for survival against aliens" story, and I have read a gazillion very similar variants. This one is a good bit more compelling than the average, though I'm not sure exactly why. Planning to go on to book 2 shortly.

  • The Consuming Fire

  • The Interdependency, Book 2
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,567
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,245

The Interdependency, humanity’s interstellar empire, is on the verge of collapse. The Flow, the extra-dimensional conduit that makes travel between the stars possible, is disappearing, leaving entire star systems stranded. When it goes, human civilization may go with it - unless desperate measures can be taken. Emperox Grayland II, the leader of the Interdependency, is ready to take those measures to help ensure the survival of billions. But nothing is ever that easy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Scalzi and Wheaton or the new dynamic duo?

  • By Donald Arquilla on 10-17-18

Fun story. Wheaton is improving.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

Story seemed a bit short, but a fun read. A bit of seriesitus going on... stretching the tail across more books than is best from a story telling standpoint. Still, Scalzi's usual wit, energy, and intelligence made it a credit well used.
Wheaton is definitely differentiating voices better, so dialog is not at all confusing in this one, as far as which character is speaking. The french accent is hilarious though... part Inspector Clouseau, part Speedy Gonzalez, part... Brooklyn or maybe New Jersey. It got a little distracting, but I have to give Wheaton an A for effort, since accents are not something I have heard him attempt before. He'll be a first rate reader yet!... And he does a great job of capturing the attitude of Scalzi's characters... all of which have *alot* of attitude.

  • Finding Truth

  • 5 Principles for Unmasking Atheism, Secularism, and Other God Substitutes
  • By: Nancy Pearcey
  • Narrated by: Pamela Klein
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 86

Don't think, just believe?That's the mantra in many circles today - whether the church, the classroom, the campus, or the voting booth. Nancy Pearcey, best-selling and critically acclaimed author, offers fresh tools to break free from presumed certainties and test them against reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Must Read!!!

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-10-16

Excellent tool for building a philosophy of life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

Great food for thought. Explains why real Christianity is not reductionistic, antiscience, or anti-intellectual. Just the opposite.

  • Age of War

  • The Legends of the First Empire, Book 3
  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 16 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,796
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,467
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,440

The epic battle between humankind and their godlike rulers finally ignites in the masterful follow-up to Age of Myth and Age of Swords. The alliance of humans and renegade Fhrey is fragile - and about to be tested as never before. As the Fhrey overlords marshal their army and sorcerers to crush the rebellion, old loyalties will be challenged while fresh conspiracies will threaten to undo all that Persephone has accomplished. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A disappointing offering that does not capitalize on one of the author's key strengths

  • By Dale on 07-28-18

So much beauty... and pain... and beauty

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-03-18

There are more beautiful moments (beautiful acts by very imperfect people) in the first dozen chapters of this book than all the other books I've read this year combined. This is why I read Sullivan. Much of life drains my soul. The beauty here and there puts some of it back. Sullivan always delivers beauty, and Reynolds is a vital part of that as well.