LISTENER

A. Smith

  • 2
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  • helpful votes
  • 3
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  • Words on the Move

  • Why English Won't - and Can't - Sit Still (Like, Literally)
  • By: John McWhorter
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 7 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 922
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 856
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 853

Words on the Move opens our eyes to the surprising backstories to the words and expressions we use every day. Did you know that silly once meant "blessed"? Or that ought was the original past tense of owe? Or that the suffix -ly in adverbs is actually a remnant of the word like? And have you ever wondered why some people from New Orleans sound as if they come from Brooklyn?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Literally A Great Listen

  • By sgonk on 10-02-16

great adventure through changing language

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-17

the author/reader is awesome, and you'll be amazed at what you learn (backshift) etc.

for a shortform version of this author's work, can go out the Lexicon Valley podcast at Slate.

  • The Great Questions of Tomorrow

  • The Ideas That Will Remake the World
  • By: David Rothkopf
  • Narrated by: David Rothkopf
  • Length: 3 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 37
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 32

A unique tour around the world in search of the great thinkers of our time and their next big ideas. With the world at the threshold of profound changes, the questions become: Where are the philosophers? Where are the great thinkers of today? Where is the next Jefferson, Curie, or Mandela? Which technologies and changes in the nature of life will they harness, embrace, or be inspired by?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • simple but important observations

  • By A. Smith on 04-23-17

simple but important observations

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-17

this book is fairly short, but can lead to profound discussions of the future of society and government with respect to the changes in human interaction due to technology.

None of the big ideas in this book will be surprising to anyone with a good understanding of technology and data science, but it should be eye-opening to those in public policy, management, etc