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Sparrowhawk

  • 15
  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 175
  • ratings
  • Thru-Hiking Will Break Your Heart

  • An Adventure on the Pacific Crest Trail
  • By: Carrot Quinn
  • Narrated by: Erin Spencer
  • Length: 14 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,029
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 969
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 963

Carrot Quinn fears that she's become addicted to the Internet. The city makes her numb, and she's having trouble connecting with others. In a desperate move, she breaks away from everything to walk 2,660 miles from Mexico to Canada on the Pacific Crest Trail. It will be her first long-distance hike.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fresh and surprising thru-hikealog

  • By Beth E. on 06-05-16

Good writing but not a lot going on

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-19

The writing is fun but Quinn writes about so many hiking days in that are the same. Not a lot of interesting events. I can't take 9 more hours of this.

  • Labyrinths

  • Emma Jung, Her Marriage to Carl, and the Early Years of Psychoanalysis
  • By: Catrine Clay
  • Narrated by: Karen Cass
  • Length: 11 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 25

Clever and ambitious, Emma Jung yearned to study the natural sciences at the University of Zurich. But the strict rules of proper Swiss society at the beginning of the 20th century dictated that a woman of Emma's stature - one of the richest heiresses in Switzerland - travel to Paris to "finish" her education, to prepare for marriage to a suitable man. Engaged to the son of one of her father's wealthy business colleagues, Emma's conventional and predictable life was upended when she met Carl Jung.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Carl plays center stage

  • By Sparrowhawk on 12-23-16

Carl plays center stage

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-16

Emma plays more of a supporting role in this book than the subtitle implies. I thought a lot more of her would be displayed, but most of the book is about Carl and his comings and goings. A lot of fairly uninteresting, superfluous information is given in this book, such as answers of patients to Jung's free association tests or some of the letters between various figures. Overall, I was disappointed. The subtitle really is misleading.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • January First

  • A Child's Descent into Madness and Her Father's Struggle to Save Her
  • By: Michael Schofield
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133

January First is a brilliant and harrowingly honest memoir. The story of Michael Schofield's daughter January's descent into scizophrenia, and her family's struggle to save her, will fascinate and move listeners. January First is the extraordinary story of a father's fight to save his child from an extremely severe case of mental illness in the face of overwhelming adversity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Jani is Interesting!

  • By Daina Krumins on 09-25-12

Fascinating story; author is annoying

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend the book because the story of January and her illness is very interesting.

What was one of the most memorable moments of January First?

January being desperate to hit her dog and her father trying to stop her and distract her.

What three words best describe Patrick Lawlor’s voice?

high-pitched, scratchy, grating

Any additional comments?

I found the author's description of his interactions with his wife to be shocking. The author was very disrespectful of his wife, and so many of their interactions left me feeling like I had wandered into a couple's spat at a party. I'm also amazed at how arrogant the author is about his perceive abilities to connect with his daughter. He really seems to be delusional in this aspect.

  • Fat Chance

  • By: Nick Spalding
  • Narrated by: Heather Wilds, Napoleon Ryan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,023
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,863
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,857

Meet Zoe and Greg Milton, a married couple who have let themselves go a bit. Zoe was a stunner in her college days, but the intervening decades have added five stone, and removed most of her self-esteem. Greg's rugby-playing days are well and truly behind him, thanks to countless pints of beer and chicken curry. When Elise, a radio DJ and Zoe's best friend, tells them about a new competition, it seems like the perfect opportunity to turn their lives around.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I freakin loved this book!

  • By Maria on 10-20-14

Disappointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-15

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

No. The story telling was long-winded. I don't think that the author has taken ibuprofen, had a blister, or returned anything to Amazon ever.

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

I haven't finished it yet, but I'm having a hard time wanting to.

Have you listened to any of Heather Wilds and Napoleon Ryan ’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I haven't.

Did Fat Chance inspire you to do anything?

Yes. I'm contemplating returning the book.

  • The Price of Silence

  • A Mom's Perspective on Mental Illness
  • By: Liza Long
  • Narrated by: Karen White
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

In The Price of Silence she takes a devastating look at how we address mental illness, especially in children, who are funneled through a system of education, mental health care, and juvenile detention that leads far too often to prison. In the end she asks one central question: if there's a poster child for cancer, why can't there be one for mental illness? The answer: the stigma.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Hard to read; many contradictions

  • By Sparrowhawk on 09-15-14

Hard to read; many contradictions

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-14

I haven't finished reading this book yet, but I'm finding her arguments to be hard to listen to already. Although I agree with the author's theme that the social stigma of mental illness needs to be addressed, I find statements that she makes about her own situation to be truly troubling.

She states that often mentally ill individuals generally aren't prone to violence, and if they are prone to violence, that they are usually self-violent, but her son is violent towards others. The author repeatedly explains that her son is not only self-violent, but violent towards her and others. She states that she only truly feels safe when her son is in a lock-down facility even though his situation is truly heartbreaking to her. But through out the parts of the book that I have read so far, she is critical of other parents who wanted her child out of the charter school because of his behaviors. She's critical of her ex-husband who wants to separate their younger children from their violent brother and who had pressed charges against their son for an assault. I feel that Long is saying that it is wrong for other parents including her ex-husband to want to protect their children from her repeatedly and unpredictably violent son despite his history and her own fear of him because he has the label of "mental illness". I understand her comparing her son to Adam Lanza, but she explains early in the book that no one in Adam Lanza's life would have thought that he would have been violent in the manner that he was, but Long's son is violent. People around Michael should be concerned about his behavior.

She doesn't know how to best keep her child from enacting violence and has to keep their household's knives with her at all times, but people outside her home should be able to deal with Michael's potentially violent outbursts. She says that by taking sole custody of her 2 younger children that her ex-husband and the court system are forcing her to choose between 2 healthy children and 1 sick child, but why should those 2 healthy children be in a situation where they need to lock themselves into a room until they can safely make a dash outside to her car to lock themselves in the car?

Long repeatedly compares mental illness to other illnesses, but she doesn't seem to realize that some illnesses can't be taken care of in the home. Some individuals with critical illnesses and conditions need critical care in hospitals and other medical facilities, but she balks at the thought of having Michael in a more permanent live-in facility. She's critical of a church leader who told another mother that the mother's son should be taught religion at home rather than in the church setting, but if the son in question had severe leukemia and was too weak to have in church instruction, people would view the religious leader's suggestion as reasonable.

Furthermore, she gives a quote that states that mental illness is like other illnesses in that it can be treated with medications, but when talking about her son's diagnoses, she readily admits that his physicians haven't been able to find a combination of medications that keep him from being violent and having outbursts.

I do agree that mental illness should be less stigmatized and that insurance companies need to reevaluate their coverages. I also agree that she is in a very difficult situation in trying to find effective treatments for her son, but it sounds like her son's condition is fairly critical. Labeling it as mental illness (which it is) and complaining about the stigma of mental illness (which exists) doesn't make her son less likely to be violent towards her and his family.

I am definitely not an advocate for guns, but Long does seem to join the argument that the availability of guns is contributing to the problem of mental illness and violence. I feel that her gun statements, even if they are accurate, are just another argument that she is using to avoid saying that some mentally ill individuals are violent and a danger to those around them.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Dead but Not Forgotten

  • Stories from the World of Sookie Stackhouse
  • By: Charlaine Harris (editor), Toni L. P. Kelner (editor), Rachel Caine, and others
  • Narrated by: Johanna Parker
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 854
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 789
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 786

Charlaine Harris' smash-hit Sookie Stackhouse series may have reached its conclusion, but the world of Bon Temps, Louisiana, lives on in this all-new collection of 15 stories. Written by a killer lineup of authors, including New York Times best-sellers Rachel Caine, MaryJanice Davidson, Jonathan Maberry and Seanan McGuire, and with introductions read by Charlaine herself, Dead but Not Forgotten puts your favorite characters center stage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bitter Sweet

  • By Catherine on 05-16-14

Great Fun.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-14

I love the Sookie Stackhouse series and its characters. Although these stories weren't written by Charlaine Harris, I loved hearing what these characters might be up to and the interpretations of other authors.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Fancy Nancy Audio Collection

  • By: Jane O' Connor
  • Narrated by: Chloe Hennessee
  • Length: 3 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 194
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158

Meet Nancy, who believes that more is always better when it comes to fancy. Now enjoy Fancy Nancy like you never have before with this splendiferous audio collection filled with 31 stories

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Titles for each chapter

  • By Nicole on 02-12-14

The copy right and performance info

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-14

The reader is okay but a little saccharine, but after every story, she reads all of the copy right and performance information. It really breaks up the flow of the stories. I wish they just gave that info at the beginning and end of the performance.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Anne of Green Gables

  • By: Lucy Maud Montgomery
  • Narrated by: Shelly Frasier
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 806
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 574
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 577

When Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert of Green Gables send for a boy orphan to help them out at their farm, they mistakenly get Anne Shirley, a feisty, independent but warm-hearted 11 year-old girl. Fortunately her sunny nature and quirky imagination win the hearts of her reluctant foster parents and everyone in the community. But not a day goes by without some memorable adventure or prank in the tragicomedy of her life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Magical

  • By David on 09-02-06

I LOVE THIS READER!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-23-14

Years ago, I had read Anne of Green Gables and wanted to have a copy on my ipod, but I was worried about getting a dud reader. This reader is excellent! I laugh out loud quite often at the reader's interpretations of Anne and Marilla! The story is wonderful!

  • Guts

  • The Endless Follies and Tiny Triumphs of a Giant Disaster
  • By: Kristen Johnston
  • Narrated by: Kristen Johnston
  • Length: 4 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,292
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,183
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,180

The two-time Emmy Award-winning actress has written her first book, a surprisingly raw and triumphant memoir that is outrageous, moving, sweet, tragic, and heartbreakingly honest. Guts is a true triumph - a memoir that manages to be as frank and revealing as Augusten Burroughs, yet as hilarious and witty as David Sedaris.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Should win awards for best audiobook performance

  • By Ohjohnny on 03-19-12

Unexpectedly Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-14

My daughter and I are big 3rd Rock from the Sun fans, so I was really excited to hear this book. Johnston was amazingly funny and real in this book. Her story of her addiction was inspiring and very "real".

  • My Story

  • By: Elizabeth Smart, Chris Stewart
  • Narrated by: Elizabeth Smart
  • Length: 9 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,951
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,661
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,657

On June 5, 2002, 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart, the daughter of a close-knit Mormon family, was taken from her home in the middle of the night by religious fanatic, Brian David Mitchell and his wife, Wanda Barzee. She was kept chained, dressed in disguise, repeatedly raped, and told she and her family would be killed if she tried to escape. After her rescue on March 12, 2003, she rejoined her family and worked to pick up the pieces of her life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well Done! Riveting and Emotional

  • By Matthew Wyman on 10-16-13

Maybe the print version is better...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-14

I was disappointed in this audiobook. As much as I believe that she has every right to tell her story personally, I believe that reading the book herself was a misstep. She has a very youthful voice, and at some times, she just sounds like a child and a brat during her reading. It was hard to concentrate on her story at times because of how she was reading it or doing the voices of her captors. I feel bad writing this opinion but a professional reader should have read this story. Her account was interesting but a bit repetitive in some areas.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful