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Damian

Santa Fe
  • 119
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  • 55
  • helpful votes
  • 149
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  • A Land Remembered

  • By: Patrick D. Smith
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 14 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,047
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,872
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,875

In this best-selling novel, Patrick D. Smith tells the story of three generations of the MacIveys, a Florida family who battle the hardships of the frontier to rise from a dirt-poor Cracker life to the wealth and standing of real estate tycoons. The story opens in 1858, when Tobias MacIvey arrives in the Florida wilderness to start a new life, and ends in 1968 with Solomon MacIvey, who realizes that the land has been exploited far beyond human need.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent historical tale

  • By Boysmom on 04-10-15

A charming story ruined...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-19

by rote, politically correct characters...either monotonously pure or impossibly evil...all of whom are eventually rendered into an important message...that is lost in banality of the ending. That said, I did agree with the message (who wouldn’t?) as well as the thoroughly researched history and obvious love the author has for the natural wonder of Florida. I’ll readily admit that Several times, tears came to my eyes...but they quickly disappeared in the face of the dialogue...the final Phillipic of Sol being the worst.

  • A Place Called Freedom

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 14 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,283
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,625
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,603

This lush novel, set in 1766 England and America, evokes an era ripe with riot and revolution, from the teeming streets of London to the sprawling grounds of a Virginia plantation. Mack McAsh burns with the desire to escape his life of slavery in Scottish coal mines while Lizzie Hallim is desperate to shed a life of sheltered subjugation to her spineless husband. United in America, their only chance for freedom lies beyond the Western frontier - if they're brave enough to take it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WORTH THE CREDIT AND THEM SOME!

  • By Georgia on 08-28-15

Ken Follett leaves us hanging without a sequel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-15-19

To this terrific tale...which is probably my only complaint...but not an insignificant one. A wonderful cast of characters- both believable and sympathetic - highlighted on a rich historical canvas. The revelations of coal miner slavery and the Dickensesque portrayal of 18th century London alone are worth the purchase. But Unfortunately, the beginning and middle of the novel far outshine the end. Once in America, Follett seems in a hurry to wrap things up...and he does...leaving me to feel somewhat shortchanged. Had the splendid tale been longer...or at least as thorough and intricate as the first two thirds, it would easily rated a five..

  • Devil in the Grove

  • Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America
  • By: Gilbert King
  • Narrated by: Peter Francis James
  • Length: 17 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,295
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,180
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,179

Devil in the Grove is the winner of the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction. Arguably the most important American lawyer of the 20th century, Thurgood Marshall was on the verge of bringing the landmark suit Brown v. Board of Education before the U.S. Supreme Court when he became embroiled in an explosive and deadly case that threatened to change the course of the civil rights movement and cost him his life. Despite death threats, the clan, and the urging of his associates, Marshall knew he had to defend "the Groveland Boys".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stunning history of the Jim Crow south. Essential

  • By Bill on 06-08-13

What a mesmerizing story of a monstrous

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-19

injustice that certainly resonated with my 30 plus years of criminal defense...but I must quibble with the delivery. And not the narrator James, but the author’s. The facts...the story of immense and monumental courage in the face of barbarous injustice stands without need of buttressing from the judgmental and sanctimonious pen of Mr. King. His broad brush condemnation of “clay eating crackers” “farmer juries” and “redneck Justice” detracts from reader empathy. In his pious, condescending and condemning arrogance, he actually adopts the very attitudes of infallible superiority and righteousness he purports to loath. Which tends to inflame. I believe he should’ve taken a page out of Theragood Marshall’s less strident and certainly more effective delivery.

  • The Memoirs of Colonel John S. Mosby

  • By: Colonel John S. Mosby, Charles Wells Russell - editor
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 9 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29

In the American Civil War, or the War between the States, three dashing cavalry leaders - Stuart, Forrest, and Mosby - so captured the public imagination that their exploits took on a glamour, which we associate - as did the writers of the time - with the deeds of the Waverley characters and the heroes of chivalry. Of the three leaders, Colonel John S. Mosby (1833 - 1916), was, perhaps, the most romantic figure. In the South, his dashing exploits made him one of the great heroes of the "Lost Cause". In the North, he was painted as the blackest of redoubtable scoundrels.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not the most mesmerizing memoirs…

  • By Damian on 03-02-19

Not the most mesmerizing memoirs…

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-19

... but priceless in its revelation of certain obscure events and interactions between great personalities. Mosby‘s defense of long maligned Stewart at Gettysburg is most revelatory, and his relationship with Grant subsequent to the Civil War in which he anecdotally details several kindnesses from his former enemy certainly makes this Volume both a pleasurable listen and terrific history.

  • The Gods of Guilt

  • By: Michael Connelly
  • Narrated by: Peter Giles
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,595
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,692
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,672

Mickey Haller gets the text, "Call me ASAP - 187," and the California penal code for murder immediately gets his attention. Murder cases have the highest stakes and the biggest paydays, and they always mean Haller has to be at the top of his game. When Mickey learns that the victim was his own former client, a prostitute he thought he had rescued and put on the straight and narrow path, he knows he is on the hook for this one. He soon finds out that she was back in LA and back in the life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • God of Scribe

  • By Big jim Picotto on 03-12-15

After 32 years of practicing criminal law

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-19

The best thing about a Michael Connolly Lincoln lawyer novel Is that he gets the details right. I’m not a big city barrister, but he seems to hit on the travails of us all. The concerns, travails, and battles… As well as the second-guessing… Seems to be multi jurisdictional, and although he’s not a lawyer he writes with a verve and an accuracy that makes the tale realistic. If you want to get into The mind of a defense attorney, then enjoy these books!

  • At Leningrad's Gates

  • The Combat Memoirs of a Soldier with Army Group North
  • By: William Lubbeck
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Cowley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175

This is the remarkable story of a German soldier who fought throughout World War II, rising from conscript private to captain of a heavy weapons company on the Eastern Front. >William Lubbeck, age 19, was drafted into the Wehrmacht in August 1939. As a member of the 58th Infantry Division, he received his baptism of fire during the 1940 invasion of France. The following spring his division served on the left flank of Army Group North in Operation Barbarossa.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Another Great German Soldier's Memoir

  • By Erik on 12-19-14

Not much of a war story, but…

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-19

A terrific story about a man went to war. The understated courage, discipline and devotion of a true soldier, family man and citizen... both of the United States and his Fatherland Germany… This is well worth the listen. The epilogue alone with the quotation from Theodore Roosevelt should be required reading of all new citizens and immigrants. I did have a problem with the narrator. I’m certainly no expert on the German language, but having lived in Germany for 2 1/2 years, I found his pronunciation of certain German words - particularly military terms - painfully and ludicrously British.

  • When the World Shook

  • By: H. Rider Haggard
  • Narrated by: Michael Page
  • Length: 12 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

When three adventurers, Bastin, Bickley, and Arbuthnot, are marooned on a South Sea island, they discover an ancient crystal sepulchre. Inside are two Atlanteans who have been in a state of suspended animation for 250,000 years! One of the awakened sleepers, Lord Oro, is the last of the Sons of Wisdom, a superior race who'd relied on their advanced technology to subjugate the planet's lesser peoples. The other Atlantean is Oro's daughter, Yva, heiress the title of Queen of the Earth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • I generally love H Rider Haggard,

  • By Damian on 02-14-19

I generally love H Rider Haggard,

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

the adventures of Allen Quartermain and his various sidekicks being both exciting and amusing...but When the World Shook is way off the mark...as if the author didn’t really have an adventure to relate or characters to develop, so, instead, he decided to embark on a hackneyed, lost world absurdity...drifting from one eye rolling anecdote to the other. Oh well. The author is still a master of his genre, this just isn’t an example.

  • The Life We Bury

  • By: Allen Eskens
  • Narrated by: Zach Villa
  • Length: 8 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43,953
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,217
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,130

College student Joe Talbert has the modest goal of completing a writing assignment for an English class. His task is to interview a stranger and write a brief biography of the person. With deadlines looming, Joe heads to a nearby nursing home to find a willing subject. There he meets Carl Iverson, and soon nothing in Joe's life is ever the same. Carl is a dying Vietnam veteran-and a convicted murderer. With only a few months to live, he has been medically paroled to a nursing home after spending thirty years in prison for the crimes of rape and murder.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good listen!

  • By Lori on 12-14-15

What a pleasant surprise...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-19

And looks like I’ll be reading another Allen Eskens. As a defense attorney with 30 plus years of practice, the story really moved me...as a Combat Veteran...well...it moved me even more. No spoilers here, but I felt the tears well up at the end...as this short, but powerful mystery struck a justifying chord on all that I have tried to do as a Front Line Constitutional Soldier.

  • Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa

  • By: Mungo Park, Kate Ferguson Marsters
  • Narrated by: Steven Brand
  • Length: 12 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 20

Mungo Park’s Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa has long been regarded as a classic of African travel literature. In fulfilling his mission to find the Niger River and in documenting its potential as an inland waterway for trade, Park was significant in opening Africa to European economic interests. His modest, low-key heroism made it possible for the British public to imagine themselves as a welcomed force in Africa. As a tale of adventure and survival, it has inspired the imaginations of audiences since its first publication in 1799 and writers from Wordsworth and Melville to Conrad.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Stranger Alone in a Strange Land

  • By Susie on 09-30-13

Africa in the 1790s...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-10-19

was clearly as remote as the dark side of the moon to the European of the same time period. As such, this story of a single man’s exploration must stand as one of the most remarkable s courageous journeys in history. That said, the last three hours of the book are devoted to a somewhat tedious critique and reconstruction of Park’s route...in an apparent attempt to further instruct contemporary explorers. Nonetheless, it’s importance as a first source historical document cannot be overemphasized. Particularly illuminating is the indictment of Arab and African slavery indigenous to The continent long before the first white man ever attempted to explore the interior regions. These observations should provide remedial thought to present day revisionists who wish to attribute African slavery to the Europeans and Americans Alone. Not to say Parks excuses or apologizes for Eur
White abduction of natives into slavery. Far from it. But it is clear from his observations that years before the cotton gin when New World slavery became really economically viable continental Africans Arabs and Moors had practiced the pernicious institution for centuries.

  • A Higher Call

  • An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II
  • By: Adam Makos
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 13 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,199
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,915
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,929

Four days before Christmas in 1943, a badly damaged American bomber struggled to fly over wartime Germany. At its controls was a 21-year-old pilot. Half his crew lay wounded or dead. It was their first mission. Suddenly a sleek, dark shape pulled up on the bomber’s tail - a German Messerschmitt fighter. Worse, the German pilot was an ace, a man able to destroy the American bomber with the squeeze of a trigger.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Proof the term "Hero" knows no borders

  • By Anon anon on 03-27-13

“We must only answer to God and our Comrades...”

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-07-19

Quoted in “A Higher Call” probably best sums up this remarkable story of good and decent men - on both sides- who suffered so many horrors and yet maintained their humanity. We of these later generations - where every perceived slight is magnified into a hatred – would do well to read and learn from these noble men of Faith, Nobility and Courage.