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Keela

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  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 63
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  • Super Sales on Super Heroes

  • By: William D. Arand
  • Narrated by: Jeff Hays
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,414
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,010
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,991

In a world full of super powers, Felix has a pretty crappy one. He has the ability to modify any item he owns. To upgrade anything. Sounds great on paper. Almost like a video game. Except that the amount of power it takes to actually change, modify, or upgrade anything worthwhile is beyond his abilities. With that in mind, Felix settled into a normal life. A normal job. His entire world changes when the city he lives in is taken over by a super villain. Becoming a country of one city. A city state.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lot better than I thought it would be

  • By Phillip hinch on 07-08-17

Engaging and top narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-18

The premise of the story doesn’t seem like it should earn it, but I find myself immensely engaged. Throughout the read, I’m invested in the characters and the creation of an odd but moving sense of an extended family - and ultimately the protection and liberty of it. Jeff Hayes generates an amazing performance, exceptional even amongst his other remarkable works. It is rare for me to re-listen to audio books because you can never regain that initial sense of wonder and discovery, however I have listened to this one multiple times and enjoy it equally each time. My only issue with it is the associated weight gain due to compulsive pancake consumption.

  • Persepolis Rising

  • By: James S. A. Corey
  • Narrated by: Jefferson Mays
  • Length: 20 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,595
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,992
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,973

The seventh novel in James S. A. Corey's New York Times best-selling Expanse series - now a major television series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beginning of a new story

  • By Michael G Kurilla on 12-17-17

Less fulfilling entry lacking a rich story arc

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-16-18

This feels like a novella made too long, and has an absence to it. It’s like the contrast was turned up and the brightness turned down. It doesn’t ever reach the moments of excitement, thrill, and/or intrigue of the others and is absent the nuanced characters, painting them and their trials with a 4-color palette that isn’t able to fully bring them to life. The Laconians in particular are a bit non-sensical - they must be an incredibly intelligent and creative community to deliver their miraculous scientific gains, and yet they are idealistically in geas to an egotistic totalitarian who casually throws his citizens into horrifying conditions that are far worse than death. Nothing about that group bears up under scrutiny. Because of this, nothing in the story itself can develop an engaging flow. Read it, as I did, because you loved the series and want to squeeze a little more out of this universe, but not because you’re looking for an exciting re-entry into the series or a compelling piece of fiction.

  • Out of Spite, Out of Mind

  • Magic 2.0, Book 5
  • By: Scott Meyer
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 7 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,838
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,531
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5,520

When you discover the world is a computer program, and you figure out that by altering the code you can time travel and perform acts that seem like magic, what can possibly go wrong? Pretty much everything. Just ask Brit, who has jumped around in time with such abandon that she has to coexist with multiple versions of herself. Now, Brit the Elder finds that her memories don't match Brit the Younger's.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • A Philip to Remember / A Britt To Forget

  • By harbinger on 07-11-18

A nonsensically funny story becomes nonsense

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

By the end of the story, Scott Meyer has taken his goofy and likable cast of characters and reduced them to one-dimensional cardboard cutouts of sheep. He strips them of any sense of depth, uniqueness, or meaning. If you have enjoyed the series for it’s sense of fraternal camaraderie, hijinx, and sophomoric charm set within a world built on an intriguing mystery, stop before this book. He ruined every good thing about the series in the latter half of this disaster. I think he was collecting a paycheck he didn’t fully earn.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Zero Hour

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 5
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 17 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 22,190
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 20,883
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,783

United Nations Special Operations Command sent an elite expeditionary force of soldiers and pilots out on a simple recon mission, and somehow along the way they sparked an alien civil war. Now the not-at-all-merry band of pirates is in desperate trouble, again. Their stolen alien starship is falling apart, thousands of light years from home. The ancient alien AI they nicknamed Skippy is apparently dead, and even if they can by some miracle revive him, he might never be the same.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Monkeys kick A**, but......

  • By Beachcombers on 02-14-18

This one is solely the Skippy/Joe interplay, don’t expect anything else

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-18

I have undoubtedly enjoyed this series, and it says something that Skippy-isms have begun to emerge in our household. There is no Skippy without R. C. Bray however, and stretching such a thin story out over the 5 books so far has been solely because of the depth and character he infused into the key players. In the context of the writing itself, Craig Alanson is putting in the minimum effort necessary to produce a continuing story. The interactions between Joe and Skippy, Hans and Skippy, Joe and Major Smythe, Joe and Sergeant Adams, Joe and Major Sims (note how I’m differentiating because there is no cohesiveness between the group of characters) are repetitive to the point of being noisome and pedantic. The most interesting things are glossed over so shallowly that it is infuriating. They encounter the most important and amazing things in the story so far - an elder-protected star system, elder guardians, members of an apex species, a sentinel - and blow by them as though they are inconsequential and largely irrelevant. Their only purpose is as tools to advance Skippy’s storyline, and really only to return him to his former magnificent self. The entire novel feels like when you play a video game long after you’ve hit the level cap and completed the main campaign and all of the DLC’s. I think we’re all ready for the new campaign to drop so we get some fresh content, improved graphics and the next compelling story arc.
R.C. Bray - Skippy’s singing voice is a catastrophe, I appreciate the humor, but wow dude. I’ll come clean though: my wife caught me practicing saying banana the way Skippy does, and she has started using Skippy-isms in our banter, so you’ve clearly made the a—hole beer can a fixture in our lives. Hats off to you sir.

  • Revenger

  • By: Alastair Reynolds
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett
  • Length: 14 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 956
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 887
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 882

The galaxy has seen great empires rise and fall. Planets have shattered and been remade. Among the ruins of alien civilizations, building our own from the rubble, humanity still thrives. And there are vast fortunes to be made, if you know where to find them.... Captain Rackamore and his crew do. It's their business to find the tiny, enigmatic worlds that have been hidden away, booby-trapped, surrounded by layers of protection - and to crack them open for the ancient relics and barely remembered technologies inside.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, crap Mastering/Post work

  • By C.Dale on 03-23-17

Good but feels like a subplot to a larger story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-18-17

First, the narration was a real issue for me. Ultimately, Clare did really grow on me and I loved her voice and investment in her telling, but the changes in volume were a mess. I had to have the volume high to hear some of her characters because her voice was so quiet, but then cover my ears when she boomed out the voice of another character. Ultimately, I realized that if I had been listening at home, eyes closed and headphones on, I would have been immersed in her storytelling. But when I have those breaks I read, I don't listen to audiobooks. Her voice and talent was therefore lost on me.
The book was engaging, fun, offbeat, but also incomplete and lacking the bones of a full story. (Yes, I know, it actually does have bones in it). It feels like an earmark for a greater story, and I'm really quite sad that I didn't get to have more than a glimpse of this universe from far outside the congregation and through only one set of naive and impetuous eyes. I adore our young Miss Ness, but she was not nearly as inquisitive or fascinated as I. Listen to this (in a quiet place) as a fun and engaging diversion, but expect to be left with an appetite that this story does nothing to satiate.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful