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  • 8
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  • All the Single Ladies

  • Unmarried Women and the Rise of an Independent Nation
  • By: Rebecca Traister
  • Narrated by: Candace Thaxton, Rebecca Traister - introduction
  • Length: 11 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 929
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 820
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 816

In a provocative, groundbreaking work, National Magazine Award finalist Rebecca Traister, "the most brilliant voice on feminism in this country" (Anne Lamott), traces the history of unmarried women in America who, through social, political, and economic means, have radically shaped our nation.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, destroyed by narration

  • By Theresa Holleran on 03-06-16

Finished It, But Rather Disappointed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-16

Would you try another book from Rebecca Traister and/or Candace Thaxton and Rebecca Traister - introduction ?

I'm not sure. As a 31 year old single woman I thought I would relate more to the subject, but the book spends a lot of time on single mothers and even when discussing non-mothers, there were only a few short-lived moments where I thought, "That's me." I felt the book meandered through topics without a clear point. There were times, especially in the historical overview in the beginning, when I felt she relied on quotes from other texts so much and added so little herself that I should have just read those books. At other times, it was almost the complete reverse and she would make a claim with no evidence to support it. There were still other moments when she seemed to completely ignore or gloss over topics, gender census data, violence against women, and masturbation are just a few that come to mind. As an example, I had read Come As You Are by Emily Nogaski shortly before this which details the science of women's sexuality and I found it rather short-sighted of this book to limit single women's sex lives to vaginal intercourse with multiple male partners. Especially, when vaginal intercourse risks disease, pregnancy, and is painful for many women and doesn't lead to orgasm. Overall, I would recommend Come As You Are over this, even though I did feel it focused a bit too much on couples (nobody's perfect), the "wow-I-didn't-know-that-how-did-I-not-know-that" moments were huge.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The Grand Sophy

  • By: Georgette Heyer
  • Narrated by: Sarah Woodward
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,338
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,040
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,037

Resourceful, adventurous and utterly indefatigable, Sophy is hardly the mild-mannered girl that the Rivenhalls expect when they agree to take her in. Kind-hearted Aunt Lizzy is shocked; stern Cousin Charles and his humorless fiancée Eugenia are disapproving.With her inimitable mixture of exuberance and grace Sophy soon sets about endearing herself to her family, but finds herself increasingly drawn to her cousin. Can she really be falling in love with him, and he with her? And what of his betrothal to Eugenia?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Full Sophy

  • By Carol on 10-17-13

Loved It! Grand Indeed!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-15

What made the experience of listening to The Grand Sophy the most enjoyable?

This book is so much fun. Sophy is a great heroine, a more forceful, more resourceful and more successful schemer than Emma Woodhouse. The hero is intelligent, bossy, often cross and very much my personal catnip. And...I loved that Sophy never had to be rescued from herself. It's a common pitfall of stories like this to give a setting down to the strong-willed heroine. The hero will exclaim, "No you mustn't take that jump with your horse! You'll break you're neck!" And the heroine cries, "I can and I will!" And then sure enough she ends up on the ground, narrowly escaping mortal injury and furthering an unjust view that a woman can know her own skills and limitations. But, good news! You won't find that here! Sophy cleverly tugs the strings and pulls it all off.

Have you listened to any of Sarah Woodward’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not listened to Sarah Woodward before, however, I really enjoyed her performance. The voices were splendid and so distinct I could always tell who was speaking. Lady Ombersley was Mrs. Hale (BBC's North and South) and Eugenia was Fanny Dashwood (1995 Sense and Sensibility).

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133,727
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 118,110
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,989

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The Girl on The Train

  • By BookReader on 12-30-15

Enjoyed It overall, but the ending fell flat

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-15

Would you consider the audio edition of The Girl on the Train to be better than the print version?

The story built up rather slowly so I might have had trouble staying committed to it if I'd been reading the print version.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Although before the "big reveal" I had worked out the mystery, that wasn't as much of an issue as how the reveal was handled. The characters had to act too far out of character and common sense to set up the reveal scenario.

What about the narrators’s performance did you like?

The story is told in first person from 3 different perspectives and each had a different narrator. I preferred 2 of the narrators, but overall I enjoyed them all. The emotional inflections felt appropriate to the characters without being distracting. I also liked that they did not try to mimic another narrator's voice for the same secondary character because it makes sense that 2 people may not consider the same things significant about someone else's speech.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I eventually got wrapped up enough not to be able to stop listening.