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  • 11
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  • The Bell Jar

  • By: Sylvia Plath
  • Narrated by: Maggie Gyllenhaal
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,748
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,402
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,389

The Bell Jar chronicles the crack-up of Esther Greenwood: brilliant, beautiful, enormously talented, and successful but slowly going under - maybe for the last time. Sylvia Plath masterfully draws the reader into Esther's breakdown with such intensity that Esther's insanity becomes completely real and even rational, as probable and accessible an experience as going to the movies. Such deep penetration into the dark and harrowing corners of the psyche is an extraordinary accomplishment and has made The Bell Jar a haunting American classic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully written, brilliantly performed.

  • By Debra W. on 02-04-16

Sad but good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-18

Sylvia Plath wrote the Bell Jar to show the isolation felt by someone going through a breakdown. Great book. Embraced by feminists but more important for its open description of a person’s distressed mental state.

  • Lone Star

  • A History of Texas and the Texans
  • By: T. R. Fehrenbach
  • Narrated by: John McLain
  • Length: 39 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39

Here is a must-listen history of the Lone Star State, together with an insider's look at the people, politics, and events that have shaped Texas from the beginning right up to our days. Never before has the story been told with more vitality and immediacy. Fehrenbach re-creates the Texas saga from prehistory to the Spanish and French invasions to the heyday of the cotton and cattle empires. He dramatically describes the emergence of Texas as a republic, the vote for secession before the Civil War, and the state's readmission to the Union after the War. 

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Top -10

  • By JNW on 03-29-18

Remember Texas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-18

This book is about a lot more than Texas. Fehrenbach tells a history of colonization in North America from about 1500 onward. The emphasis on Texas is interesting because it was a boundary area where Spanish, Anglo-Celtic, and Amerind cultures fought it out (not being a history buff, this book gave me a much better understanding of terms like Amerind and Anglo-Celtic). All the races had strengths, made mistakes, and had the great courage required to live on a frontier. All the people lived in an environment where decisions were often made based on how to kill or avoid being killed. In my mind, the phrase "Remember the Alamo" has been replaced by "Remember Texas"--rather than remembering a single battle, this book fills in a story that took place over centuries.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • What Every BODY Is Saying

  • An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People
  • By: Joe Navarro, Marvin Karlins
  • Narrated by: Paul Costanzo
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,909
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,207
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,185

Listen to this book and send your nonverbal intelligence soaring. Joe Navarro, a former FBI counterintelligence officer and a recognized expert on nonverbal behavior, explains how to "speed-read" people: decode sentiments and behaviors, avoid hidden pitfalls, and look for deceptive behaviors. You'll also learn how your body language can influence what your boss, family, friends, and strangers think of you.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Let Me Hear Your Body Talk

  • By Cynthia on 07-06-13

Don't waste your money

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

Terrible book, very disappointing. Spends a good bit of time telling reader how important the information is, repeats this endlessly, occasionally makes an interesting point or tells a story, reminds reader of how great this information is, and so on. Not worthless but not much value either. The narrator didn't have much to work with.

  • A Clockwork Orange

  • By: Anthony Burgess
  • Narrated by: Tom Hollander
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,243
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,763
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,757

A vicious 15-year-old droog is the central character of this 1963 classic, a frightening fable about good and evil, and the meaning of human freedom. In Anthony Burgess' nightmare vision of the future, where the criminals take over after dark, the story is told by the central character, Alex, who talks in a brutal invented slang that brilliantly renders his and his friends' social pathology.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book, great narration, but not for everyone

  • By Steve on 06-28-09

Not good

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-18-18

Tom Hollander does an excellent reading, but the book is about meanness for the sake of meanness.

  • Man's Search for Meaning

  • By: Viktor E. Frankl
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,818
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,959
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,962

Internationally renowned psychiatrist, Viktor E. Frankl, endured years of unspeakable horror in Nazi death camps. During, and partly because of his suffering, Dr. Frankl developed a revolutionary approach to psychotherapy known as logotherapy. At the core of his theory is the belief that man's primary motivational force is his search for meaning.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read This if You're Very Sick and/or Thinking About Ending Your Life

  • By Derek on 07-21-15

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-18-18

Immediately useful. For anyone who deals with pain, suffering, and death, this book provides a healthy perspective. The ideas are easy to grasp, and the author doesn't waste time.

  • So Sad Today

  • Personal Essays
  • By: Melissa Broder
  • Narrated by: Melissa Broder
  • Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 171

Melissa Broder always struggled with anxiety. In the fall of 2012, she went through a harrowing cycle of panic attacks and dread that wouldn't abate for months. So she began @sosadtoday, an anonymous Twitter feed that allowed her to express her darkest feelings and that quickly gained a dedicated following. In So Sad Today, Broder delves deeper into the existential themes she explores on Twitter.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • You don’t have to read this

  • By Chris on 06-18-18

You don’t have to read this

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-18-18

Do you want to study craziness (in the sense of not mentally healthy)? This author is often crazy and likes talking about her craziness. Her vulgarity is extreme but expressing it is probably healthy for her and others. I don’t recommend the book because the subject is so unpleasant, but it contains some sharp insights into unhappiness and what can be done about it.

121 of 141 people found this review helpful

The World According to Garp audiobook cover art
  • The World According to Garp

  • A Novel
  • By: John Irving
  • Narrated by: Michael Prichard
  • Length: 20 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 913
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 691
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 686

Here are the life and times of T. S. Garp, the bastard son of Jenny Fields, a feminist leader ahead of her times. Here are the life and death of a famous mother and her almost-famous son; theirs is a world of sexual extremes, even of sexual assassinations. The World According to Garp is a novel rich with "lunacy and sorrow", yet the dark, violent events of the story do not undermine a comedy both ribald and robust.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • This book is due for a new production

  • By Steve on 05-26-10

Long and not worth it

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-18

This is a terrible novel. I knew halfway through that it is awful, and I completed it only to be able to give it a fair chance. But the narrator is excellent and delivers the story perfectly. If a reader happens to like the story, they probably will be happy with the performance.

  • 400 Things Cops Know: Street-Smart Lessons From a Veteran Patrolman

  • By: Adam Plantinga
  • Narrated by: Mark Boyett
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,904
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,705
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,703

400 Things Cops Know shows police work on the inside, from the viewpoint of the regular cop on the beat - a profession that can range from rewarding to bizarre to terrifying, all within the course of an eight-hour shift. Written by veteran police sergeant Adam Plantinga, 400 Things Cops Know brings the listener into life the way cops experience it - a life of danger, frustration, occasional triumph, and plenty of grindingly hard routine work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thank you, Adam Plantinga!

  • By A.Ward on 05-30-16

Ugly stuff & accurate

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-17

Before joining the police, this book will certainly open the eyes of any applicant. It describes many reasons for choosing a different line of work.

  • The Old Testament

  • By: Amy-Jill Levine, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Amy-Jill Levine
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 872
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 776
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 766

The Old Testament - written in ancient Israel by many different authors over the course of a thousand years - has had more meaning to more people than any other book the world has known. In a series of 24 lively lectures, Professor Levine explores selected passages from the texts known as the Old Testament, the Hebrew Bible, and the Tanakh, revealing how fresh research and findings from scholars of archaeology, cross-cultural studies, and comparative religion can deepen your understanding.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A critical but inspiring 'walk thru the' Bible

  • By Jacobus on 12-14-13

Waste your time

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-17

Read the Old Testament but don't waste time listening to this course.

Professor Levine does not have convincing facts or opinions. For example, she mentions several times that the OT often tells what people did but does not tell us their motives. Then, Levine fruitlessly speculates about motives. Her discussion of what David and Bathsheba might have been thinking is especially useless and unsubstantiated.

In fact, Levine's discussion of Saul and David almost completely misses their story, which is an easy story to read and understand if Levine would just stick with it. Levine seems to favor the view that King David may be more myth than fact, like King Arthur and Knights of the Round Table. From that point of view, she could try to provide more insight into the thinking of the people who passed along the myth. Instead, she tries to speculate on the motives of the mythological figure. Unfortunately, she has nothing that supports her speculations.

If reading this review has been a waste of your time, you will have some idea of how it feels to listen to this not-so-great course.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful