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Lenny P

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Bad Country audiobook cover art

Great Story, Fabulous Narrator

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-18

Great murder mystery, but Mark Bramhall's narration really makes the story come alive. He's got local accents, especially those of native American characters, down perfectly! I rarely write reviews, but this one deserves the accolade. You won't be disappointed.

Comanche Dawn audiobook cover art

Too Much!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-15

I chose this book because of it's overall rating and other reviews, hoping that it would be an in depth treatment of Comanche history and culture; especially, the establishment of their dominance in the southern plains. After all, the book lasts for over 23 hours! What I found was an overly romanticized fantasy of a mythic warrior's adventures, with only a modest nod to the history and culture of this very important tribe of Native Americans. As far as the book's description of Comanche culture, the author imposes his own over romanticized fantasy of how these people lived and what they thought. This is NOT a book that is equivalent to Joseph Marshall's excellent story about the Lakota, "Hundred in the Hand"; or Karl Schlesier's two excellent novels about the Cheyenne and Nez Perce ("Trail of the Red Butterfly" and "Aurora Crossing ..."). If you want to get a better understanding of Native American culture, buy those two authors. If you want to read about Comanche's beating their slave wives, or what wild horses think about as they are being captured and broken by cruel horsemen, this book is your ticket.

I have listened to the entire 20+ hours of this book, hoping that it would do for Comanche's what Marshall and Schlesier did for other tribes, but all I got were a few nuggets.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

Trail of the Red Butterfly audiobook cover art

Plains Indian Culture Brought to Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-11

Imagine yourself, a Spanish lancer in the early 19 century, caught in an ambush in a narrow mountain pass in Northern Mexico, with war paint adorned men shooting muskets and arrows at your troop; as your horses rear uncontrollably preventing you from escaping from certain death. This is but one scene in a richly written tale of life in what became the southwest U.S. and Mexico. The author masterfully describes the rituals which the plains indians invoke in their preparation for battles, including how they are dressed and painted; how they strategize their plans for revenge against the killers of their tribesmen; the rituals they employ after killing their enemies to request their spirit's forgiveness for having killed them.

The book is filled with insights into the culture of plains indians, in this case Cheyenne, Kiowa and Gataka (a tribe closely related to Kiowas and Apaches)

This is a truly entertaining, and excellently written narrative of adventure on the plains.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful