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Renee

Tucson, AZ, United States
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 112
  • helpful votes
  • 40
  • ratings
  • The Greatest Science Fiction Stories of the 20th Century

  • By: Greg Bear, Terry Bisson, David Brin, and others
  • Narrated by: David Ackroyd, Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 377
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 200

A walk around the block, a quick drive, before shutting down your PC ? these short story collections are perfect for when you only have a few minutes to listen."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Biased toward the last 20 years of sci-fi

  • By Gregory R. Martin on 06-30-03

Some great stories, some real duds

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-13

What did you like about this audiobook?

A couple of classic stories -- Arthur Clarke, Le Guin, but some painful duds.

How has the book increased your interest in the subject matter?

No.

What did you find wrong about the narrator's performance?

Overacting, especially loud to soft variations (turn it up, turn it down) and cloying enactments of children's parts (not that they weren't cloying to begin with. The wise child in SF is a deeply annoying stereotype.)

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Some Hope

  • By: Edward St. Aubyn
  • Narrated by: Edward Hibbert
  • Length: 15 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 33
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 33

One of England’s brightest young literary stars, Edward St. Aubyn is compared to Evelyn Waugh and Graham Greene for his novels’ wry observations and sharp dialogue. Some Hope traverses cultural and social landscapes that range from British manor houses to Bronx alleyways. A remarkable trilogy, it is the story of a wealthy young man who, after a horrific childhood, finds his life filled with both decadence and grace.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully written autobiographical trilogy

  • By Renee on 03-20-12

Beautifully written autobiographical trilogy

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-12

What made the experience of listening to Some Hope the most enjoyable?

The hero begins as a little boy with a truly dreadful father and an alcoholic mother, wealthy English layabouts living in the south of France. In the second novel, he's 22, a hopeless junkie, and his father has just died. In the final volume, he's 30, clean, and finally pulling himself together to get on with his life.

Each novel takes place over just an eventful day or two in Patrick's messy life, but they all feel rich and enveloping, due largely to St Aubyn's wonderful prose and the mordant wit that runs through all the books. The novels are a little like Evelyn Waugh, a little like Proust (in the parade of vivid, mostly awful characters who come into Patrick's life), a little like A Dance to the Music of Time, and and yet they seem very original and wholly heartfelt. The themes that run through them, the repeated scenes and recurring characters, the current of profound outrage at the abuse that's distorted the hero's life -- it all feels like part of a fully imagined whole. I was truly sad when I finished the 3rd book -- and looking forward to St. Aubyn's new one.

The narrator was very good with the voices and English accents -- shakier with the others. But that's okay.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Nineteen Seventy Four

  • Red Riding Quartet
  • By: David Peace
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 277
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 90

Jeanette Garland, missing Castleford, July 1969. Susan Ridyard, missing Rochdale, March 1972. Claire Kemplay, missing Morley, since yesterday. It’s winter, 1974, Yorkshire, Christmas bombs, Lord Lucan on the run, the Bay City Rollers, and Eddie Dunford’s got the job he wanted – crime correspondent for the Yorkshire Evening Post. He didn’t know it was going to be a season in hell. A dead little girl with a swan’s wings stitched into her back. A gypsy camp in a ring of fire. Corruption everywhere you look.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliantly refreshing and original

  • By Ms Letty on 07-14-10

He thinks he can write

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-10

Just an awful, silly book. The hapless first-person hero -- a journalist who never seems to do any actual work -- investigates a unbelievable, sadistic crime in a totally vile world. Lurid, showy, impressionistic prose makes the whole thing that much worse.

A waste of a credit.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Persuader

  • By: Lee Child
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 14 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,382
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,162
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,142

Jack Reacher. The ultimate loner. An elite ex-military cop who left the service years ago, he's moved from place to place...without family...without possessions...without commitments.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Child at His Best! A Must Read for Reacher Fans!

  • By Joanna on 06-19-09

Yes! More Lee Childs! Always worth the ticket.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-10

Lu-u-ved it. Reacher reasons and muscles his way through intricate difficulties and unspeakable difficulties as only he can. Very, very nice.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World

  • By: Jack Weatherford
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis, Jack Weatherford
  • Length: 14 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,621
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,415
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,429

The Mongol army led by Genghis Khan subjugated more lands and people in 25 years than the Romans did in 400. In nearly every country the Mongols conquered, they brought an unprecedented rise in cultural communication, expanded trade, and a blossoming of civilization.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, insightful, intriguing.

  • By Peter on 03-05-10

A passionate, eye-opening chunk of history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-10

The writer, Weatherford, is not what you'd call a great prose stylist, but the story he tells is stunning, and he did all the leg-work. His heart is in it. If you want to know how the modern world was born, listen to this.

Davis' narration is thrilling. Loved it all.

78 of 85 people found this review helpful

  • The Gnostic Gospels

  • By: Elaine Pagels
  • Narrated by: Lorna Raver
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 577
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 359
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 366

The Gnostic Gospels provides engaging listening for those seeking a broader perspective on the early development of Christianity. Author and noted scholar Elaine Pagels suggests that Christianity could have developed quite differently if Gnostic texts had become part of the Christian canon.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The other side of Jesus

  • By Laura on 05-19-06

if you're really into bibliography

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-09

I cannot recommend this too highly.

"Contributors to this analysis include R.H. Smith, in Great Britain, G.B. Smuythe, in the Netherlands, D.H. Lawrence, in Germany, L.D. Clark, in Poland. . . " and on and on and on. For those who like it, it's what they like.

There's interesting stuff in here, somewhere, but when it's on your iPod you can't just turn the page.

7 of 36 people found this review helpful

  • Swann's Way

  • By: Marcel Proust
  • Narrated by: John Rowe
  • Length: 20 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 265
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 92
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 94

Swann's Way is the first volume of Proust's supreme masterpiece, the seven-part novel entitled Remembrance of Things Past. In it, Proust recalls the early youth of Charles Swann in the small town of Combray as seen through the eyes of the narrator. It then shifts to Swann himself, now a fashionable man caught up in turn-of-the-century Paris and a tortured love affair.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A masterpiece, brilliantly read

  • By Cheryl on 08-25-08

a perfect reading of a great book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-06

All I can say is that I wish that Rowe reading the whole of "A la recherche" -- unabridged -- were available: I'd be happy for months listening to the great sonorous flow of minute psychological observation, social comedy and exquisite description of nature that is Proust. I was especially entranced by Rowe's rendering of the scene in which Maman reads to young Marcel. Magic.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful