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  • I Will Teach You to Be Rich

  • By: Ramit Sethi
  • Narrated by: Ramit Sethi
  • Length: 9 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,953
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,517
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,491

At last, for a generation that's materially ambitious yet financially clueless comes I Will Teach You To Be Rich, Ramit Sethi's 6-week personal finance program for 20-to-35-year-olds. A completely practical approach delivered with a nonjudgmental style that makes readers want to do what Sethi says, it is based around the four pillars of personal finance - banking, saving, budgeting, and investing - and the wealth-building ideas of personal entrepreneurship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Behavioral approach to money sets this book apart

  • By Erica on 03-08-11

Not much new, but nice humor

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-18

If you've read a good personal finance book, most of this will not surprise you. Ramit's personality and humor is most of what what makes it better than the dime-a-dozen other books out there

  • Magnetic Charisma

  • How to Build Instant Rapport, Be More Likable, and Make a Memorable Impression
  • By: Patrick King
  • Narrated by: Gregory Sutton
  • Length: 2 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 56
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 56

Develop your own personal gravity with concrete skills to stand out, be noticed, and captivate people. If you (1) walk into a room and feel invisible, or (2) want to ensure you make a powerful personal impact - newsflash: you need better advice than "fake it 'til you make it" or "just be yourself". Confidently approach and excel in any social setting.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Lacks any structure

  • By Yannick on 10-15-17

Lacks any structure

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-17

the book assumes the stance of positive thinking in conversations - be interested in others, and accept their opinions without one-upping or correcting them - verbosely and without any structure or without any context in which the tips would be applied. So we're told to adopt ways of expressing from the other, except when you shouldn't, and this "do this, but sometimes you have to do the other" goes on and on without any meaningful structure. It would make the book 100% better if every "don't do X" could be joined by a "here's why we do X and that's how we should deal with it instead".

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • 10% Happier

  • How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-Help That Actually Works
  • By: Dan Harris
  • Narrated by: Dan Harris
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,975
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,123
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,056

After having a nationally televised panic attack on Good Morning America, Dan Harris knew he had to make some changes. A lifelong nonbeliever, he found himself on a bizarre adventure, involving a disgraced pastor, a mysterious self-help guru, and a gaggle of brain scientists.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Inspired me to restart my meditation practice

  • By Julie W. Capell on 12-07-16
  • 10% Happier
  • How I Tamed the Voice in My Head, Reduced Stress Without Losing My Edge, and Found a Self-Help That Actually Works
  • By: Dan Harris
  • Narrated by: Dan Harris

insightful but short

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-15

The book is 70% autobiographic and 30% reflection of the author's own ideas on mindfulness and associated concepts. It is well-written and well-read, and his descriptions of seeing luminaries like Eckart Tolle, Deepak Chopra and the Dalai Lama in person, as well as his perspective on comparing the self-help movements with religious groups, are all interesting and sometimes cogent. But - and here comes the but - if you're looking for a practical guide, this is not it. If you like (auto)biographic works, and wouldn't mind some (careful and well-thought-out) chest-thumping and eloquence by a news anchor, this book is definitely for you.
The book is read by the author himself who is (did I mention it?) a professional news anchor, which means he both puts his personal emotions in the reading in a good way, and he's perfectly intelligible.

Start with Why audiobook cover art
  • Start with Why

  • How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
  • By: Simon Sinek
  • Narrated by: Simon Sinek
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,969
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,755
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,674

Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty from customers and employees alike? Even among the successful, why are so few able to repeat their successes over and over? People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inspire to find why you do what you do

  • By A. Yoshida on 09-19-13

it hurts!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-14

What would have made Start with Why better?

Start with Why starts with a plausible, and credible premise - start why things are like they are, and you'll learn something important. And then the author thinks it best to prove it. With anecdotes! With anecdotes that are more bullshit than anything else.

So, people in the middle ages thought the world was flat (they didn't - this was an invention of 18th century protestants to ridicule the catholics for not accepting a heliocentric universe in the 17th century), Wozniak's Apple I was a singular thing (no, it was not, it was part of a whole "home computer" movement) and was aimed at businesses (nope, the home computer movement targeted hobbyist early adopters first). So, Sinek takes basic facts to illustrate his point, and fleshes them out with absolute nonsense. And if you've got any decent amount of world knowledge, your toenails will curl themselves up.

Now, the best way of presenting this advice would be to use personal stories, as people do who are consultants. Or to use fictional examples, which can work with a bit of phantasy. If you have to invoke famous people to make your point, please make sure to do a bit of researching and fact-checking and don't turn modern history into a wonderland of half-truths.

What do you think your next listen will be?

If you like this general kind of book, you might be better served with Seth Godin's book, which are inspiring-and-inspirational, and still a bit shallow in the point they make, but illustrate the point with well-researched examples. Or stick to Peter Drucker.