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Emily

  • 120
  • reviews
  • 18
  • helpful votes
  • 120
  • ratings
  • Serenity Found

  • More Unauthorized Essays on Joss Whedon's Firefly Universe
  • By: Jane Espenson - editor, Leah Wilson, Nathan Fillion, and others
  • Narrated by: Colby Elliott
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 7

Serenity Found takes the contents of Finding Serenity even further, exploring not just the show but the events of the film as well, to create an anthology that's even more thought-provoking, fascinating, and far-thinking than its predecessor.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • NOT stories set IN the Firefly universe.

  • By KnK in CO on 03-13-18

Alright

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-18

I liked this audiobook, and I preferred it to the previous Finding Serenity.

However, it was a bit of a drag, and it felt like at least half of the essays had nothing to do with Firefly or Serenity. Like, I purchased this audiobook to listen to a book about Serenity, not Stargate or Buffy or Battlestar Galactica or Criminal Minds, even if I like half of those programmes. It was a bit of a letdown.

  • Doctor Who: The Lost Angel

  • 12th Doctor Audio Original
  • By: George Mann, Cavan Scott
  • Narrated by: Kerry Shale
  • Length: 1 hr and 11 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46

All Alex Yow wants is to become a photojournalist and break her first story. All Brandon Yow wants is for his sister to keep out of trouble and come home. But that's not going to happen, because Alex has taken a picture of a statue. A statue that can move. A statue that makes people disappear. A statue that is hunting them down. In upstate New York, the Doctor is chasing weird energies that should not exist. Teaming up with Alex and Brandon, he discovers a powerful force enslaved to another's will.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • good story

  • By Amazon Customer on 01-24-17

Alright

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-18

This story was alright, but the more the Weeping Angels appears the less terrifying they are. The narrator’s accent was also a bit grating and distracting from the story.

  • The Battle of Thermopylae

  • 300 Spartans and the Forgotten Citizen-Soldiers Who Fought with Them
  • By: HistoryIn60
  • Narrated by: Harriet Seed
  • Length: 1 hr and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13

Most people know about the Battle of Thermopylae, even if they don’t recognize the name. During the second Persian invasion of Greece, 300 Spartans fought against Xerxes I’s forces on a narrow mountain pass. With such cinematic details, no wonder this sensational battle inspired the blockbuster film 300. However, both the film and popular imagination miss many important details about this battle. This concise history sheds light on the thousands of Greek citizen-soldiers who fought alongside the Spartans, forever changing the course of Greek identity and nationhood.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A quick entertaining History lesson.

  • By cosmitron on 04-28-18

Good Info

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

I found this really informative, and I learnt a lot about the Battle of Thermopylae. I think these History in 60 minute audiobooks are really great.

However, the sound quality wasn’t good. There was persistent crackling in the background of the audiobook and it was quite distracting. Adding to that, the narrator had quite a dry voice. It made the book itself sound a bit boring, and if I were less into history, I probably would have switched it off.

  • The Big Book of Serial Killers

  • An Encyclopedia of Serial Killers - 150 Serial Killer Files of the World's Worst Murderers
  • By: Jack Rosewood, Rebecca Lo
  • Narrated by: Kevin Kollins
  • Length: 17 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135

There is little more terrifying than those who hunt, stalk, and snatch their prey under the cloak of darkness. These hunters search not for animals, but for the touch, taste, and empowerment of human flesh. They are cannibals, vampires, and monsters, and they walk among us. These serial killers are not mythical beasts with horns and shaggy hair. They are people living among society, going about their day-to-day activities until nightfall. They are the Dennis Rader's, the fathers, husbands, church-going members of the community.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • GREAT FOR TRUE CRIME DEVOTÉES, BUT....

  • By Linda Lou on 10-31-17

Pretty Good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

This was a really good encyclopedia concerning serial killers. I really liked that it branched out from the US and dealt with cases from around the world, and that it talked about cases that aren't known by the wider public instead of just focusing on serial killers that people have heard of, such as Jeffrey Dahmer or Fred and Rosemary West. It was pretty cool in that it also focused on female serial killers as well, such as the woman who poisoned her stepchildren with acid.

Each chapter is quite small, so it's not massively detailed, but it does have a quick overview of each victim, their childhood, how they killed, their victims, the timeline of events and their capture/imprisonment and death, if applicable.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Midnight Sun

  • By: Trish Cook
  • Narrated by: Taylor Meskimen
  • Length: 6 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91

Seventeen-year-old Katie Price has a rare disease that makes exposure to even the smallest amount of sunlight deadly. Confined to her house during the day, her company is limited to her widowed father and her best friend. It isn't until after nightfall that Katie's world opens up, when she takes her guitar to the local train station and plays for the people coming and going. Charlie Reed is a former all-star athlete at a crossroads in his life - and the boy Katie has secretly admired from afar for years. When he happens upon her playing guitar one night, fate intervenes and the two embark on a star-crossed romance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed it

  • By Jess on 08-01-18

Awful

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-18

I bought this book because I wanted to see the film, but didn't manage to. The book is normally better than the film anyway. No, I wish that I'd seen the film over the book, because at least the film would only have been two hours spent on this trash.

The writing is bizarre and awkward. I was listening to the audiobook, and the narrator sounded like she stumbled a couple of times. Other than that, she was a good narrator, with a nice voice. The writing felt like the author was trying to be unnecessarily flowery or beautiful, but it fell really flat. I also have no idea what the characters look like in general because the only character that is described is Charlie, and even he isn't described very well.

The main character is sooooo annoying. She wants to be a person outside of her illness, and then mentions said illness in EVERY SENTENCE. Like... I get it, you're ill, stop reminding me every five seconds. Nor does the representation of said rare illness (XP) actually come across as true. The whole condition felt incredibly romanticised when even a small amount of research shows it to be incredibly painful and awful. It also felt like it wasn't quite the right timescale <spoiler> once Katie started suffering the side effects of being in the sun, and then she died incredibly quickly. </spoiler> The ending also makes me hate Katie, because of the effect on her father and Morgan. Her poor father is probably the best character in this book, and Katie literally rants about him in every other chapter and all he wants for her is to live. <spoiler> I just don't understand why Katie had to be alone with Charlie to die, and why she couldn't take her dad with her as well. The man has lost his entire family, and he's losing his only child and she doesn't let him stay with her, after everything she says that he's done for her, sacrificing his life for her? I get that she thinks that she and Charlie are soul mates or something, but this book spans what? 3 months or something? and she goes off on a boat to die with her boyfriend and leaves her father and best friend back on the pier? </spoiler> Katie is just incredibly selfish and stupid, and I feel for her father.

The romance is also incredibly flat. Aside from descriptions of kisses, nothing really happens. It's pretty boring and most of the time, Katie is just describing how beautiful Charlie is. Like... is that it? There wasn't any chemistry and Charlie himself felt like he was fake.

The whole novel just felt dumb.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Finding Serenity

  • Anti-Heroes, Lost Shepherds and Space Hookers in Joss Whedon's Firefly
  • By: Jane Espenson ed, Glenn Yeffeth with
  • Narrated by: Colby Elliott
  • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

Firefly's early demise left fans with a deep sense of loss and plenty of unanswered questions. From what was wrong with the pilot to what was right with the Reavers, from the use of Chinese to how correspondence between Joss and network executives might have gone, from a philosopher's perspective on "Objects in Space" to a sex therapist's analysis of Inara, Finding Serenity is filled with writing as exciting, funny, and enthralling as the show itself.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Average

  • By Emily on 07-07-18

Average

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-18

Some of these essays were pretty good, I particularly liked the essay concerning subtext and colours within the Firefly Universe and the final essay written by Jewel Staite on her favourite memories of the show. Others were deeply philosophical and were only vaguely relevant.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Doctor Who - Horror of Glam Rock

  • By: Paul Magrs
  • Narrated by: Paul McGann, Sheridan Smith, Bernard Cribbins, and others
  • Length: 1 hr and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4

The Doctor and Lucie go glam when the Tardis makes an unexpected landing in 1974. Slade, The Sweet and Suzi Quatro are Top of the Pops - and brother-and-sister duo The Tomorrow Twins will soon be joining them, if the star-making Svengali Arnold Korns has his way. But will their dreams turn to dust at a service station somewhere on the M62, besieged by a pack of alien monsters?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Confusing

  • By Emily on 06-26-18

Confusing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-18

I love the Eighth Doctor and Lucie Miller, but this audiobook was a bit of a disappointment. The acting was good, the basic plot was average, but the monsters were underdeveloped and really confusing, the characters got all jumbled up and the book in general didn’t make much sense.

  • War of Two

  • Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the Duel That Stunned the Nation
  • By: John Sedgwick
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 17 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 91
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 89

A provocative and penetrating investigation into the rivalry between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, whose infamous duel left the founding father dead and turned a sitting vice president into a fugitive. In the summer of 1804, two of America's most eminent statesmen squared off, pistols raised, on a bluff along the Hudson River. That two such men would risk not only their lives but the stability of the young country they helped forge is almost beyond comprehension. Yet we know that it happened.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Provocative

  • By Jean on 11-25-15

Not Just A Duel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

This book is supposedly about the famous duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr in 1804, but is in reality, not really about that duel at all. It is a dual biography, ranging from both men’s childhoods through college, spending quite a long time on the revolutionary war (which is understandable considering how it shaped both men) and then into their political lives, their personal lives and the run up to the duel.

I actually found it quite interesting reading after the duel, because at that point it became a singular biography of Aaron Burr, and it mainly focused on his attempt at treason, his relationship with Jefferson and his daughter Theodosia. This really made you feel for Theodosia and her husband because it felt like Burr took very little seriously in his later life, including his financial situation.

This was a well written biography, though it lacked a certain historical touch. Some words were used in the wrong context and it didn’t really refer to other historians, who know the topic much better than Sedgwick did, though he does seem to have dedicated a lot of research to this book.

The narrator was also quite slow. I had to speed it up to 2.5x to stop myself from zoning out.

  • Curse of the Ancients

  • Son of Earp Series, Book 1
  • By: Chuck Buda
  • Narrated by: Jack Wallen Jr.
  • Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13

A young man, James Johnson, illegitimate son of the legendary Wyatt Earp, dreams of adventure and following in his daddy's footsteps. James and his mentally disabled friend, Carson, are about to come face to face with an evil previously unimaginable in their little town. An evil they invited in.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good

  • By Emily on 06-14-18

Good

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

I was given this free review copy audiobook at my request and have voluntarily left this review.

This was a good book - I loved the friendship between James and Carson, they were great together.

I wasn't quite expecting a shifter western story, but it was written well and even though it was like there was a mass conglomeration of different genres, the novel just sort of worked well.

The characters were well characterized and likeable.

  • Rivals Unto Death

  • Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr
  • By: Rick Beyer
  • Narrated by: Rick Beyer
  • Length: 6 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

From the best-selling author of The Greatest Stories Never Told series, the epic history of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr's illustrious and eccentric political careers and their fateful rivalry. The day was hot and sticky. The man in the rowboat was an impetuous hothead. His row across the choppy Hudson that morning led to a confrontation that has burned bright in the American mind for more than 200 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Emily on 06-14-18

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

I really loved this book. I particularly liked how it’s set backwards, starting at chapter ten and counting down.

I loved the writing style, and the way that this book is not as bias as some other joint biographies you can find. It truly felt like the author was trying to sit on a fence. It was simple, clear and straight forward. A very good joint biography.