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Michael Lapointe

Charlotte area in NC USA
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 6
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  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself

  • By: Harriet Ann Jacobs
  • Narrated by: Jean Barrett
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 322
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 285
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283

One of the first personal narratives written by an ex-slave, this is also one of the few written by a woman. Harriet Jacobs (1813-97) was enslaved, along with her family, in North Carolina under a ruthless master who sexually harassed her. After several failed escape attempts, and several years of hiding, she finally made her way North to freedom, where she was eventually reunited with her children. The book was published in 1861.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible Journey

  • By Beverly E. Van Citters on 03-05-14

Thankful to hear it. Articulate.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-17

I find myself wishing freedom, peace and dignity for all, yet here in America, still so much discrimination. So much political manipulation and rhetoric. I hope many become informed and soften in their hearts for the humanity in each of us, even if upbringing and education have led so many off the path of peace. It is touching to know that many good people stood up to the deplorable laws.

  • The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights

  • By: Sir James Knowles
  • Narrated by: Eric Brooks
  • Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 241
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 200

King Arthur was a legendary British leader of the late fifth and early sixth century who, according to the medieval histories and romances, led the defense of the Romano-Celtic British against the Saxon invaders in the early sixth century. This book gives an account of the life of this great legend of all times.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • This was painful!

  • By T. Rod on 09-05-14

Better than I imagined.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

I've never gone through a book on King Arthur, and this was great. I was surprised in a good way by the scenes of a spiritual nature, as these stories are significant in the development of humanity and are really worth our time to live into the pictures presented. There is wisdom behind these depictions.

  • China in Ten Words

  • By: Yu Hua, Allan H. Barr (translator)
  • Narrated by: Don Hagen
  • Length: 7 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 153
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 139
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 138

From one of China’s most acclaimed writers, his first work of nonfiction to appear in English: a unique, intimate look at the Chinese experience over the last several decades, told through personal stories and astute analysis that sharply illuminate the country’s meteoric economic and social transformation. Characterized by Yu Hua’s trademark wit, insight, and courage, China in Ten Words is a refreshingly candid vision of the “Chinese miracle” and all its consequences, from the singularly invaluable perspective of a writer living in China today.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Best Popular Book on China

  • By taylor storey on 09-21-14

An intelligent, thoughtful account of cultural lif

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-16

Very good. The author is insightful and offers a healthy perspective, indicative of a reflective soul.

  • Eichmann in Jerusalem

  • A Report on the Banality of Evil
  • By: Hannah Arendt
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 375
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 372

Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared in The New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, Eichmann in Jerusalem is as shocking as it is informative - an unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lest we forget the banality of evil

  • By BryinSiam on 08-03-14

Important thinking here, poorGerman pronunciation.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-15

I was impressed with the background Hannah Arendt brought to give context to the legal questions. I experience her thinking as remarkably on target most of the time, and it appears that she had an objectivity lacking in many other circles involved either in defense & prosecution. I was surprised that she was so strongly rejected by her peers for being willing to look at the consequences of cooperation or resistance. I felt she asked the right questions. It is sad to see anywhere that revenge is often sought instead of justice. I would hope today there is more international support for justice, so that crimes against humanity would not be tolerated. I didn't know to what extent many other countries joined the Nazi's terrible, unconscionable murder of different groups of people. Hannah Arendt brings this and more to our attention. It would do a lot of good if people today consider how events the past resembles the present. This was an important experience for me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful