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J.B.

Fort Lauderdale, FL, United States
  • 254
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  • 259
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  • Fear

  • Trump in the White House
  • By: Bob Woodward
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,761
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,466
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,403

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files, and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Extremely Depressing...

  • By Sena on 09-11-18

Fear, Fiasco and Mental Fragility

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

Fear; Trump in the White House, by Bob Woodward, and read by Robert Petkoff. Woodward takes us on an interlude into the presidential management of the affairs of state by Donald J. Trump, and his administration. The story is simply a depiction without comment of interactive incidents in the management of national issues by the President and his staff. The author lets the reader draw her/his own conclusions thereupon. A natural incidental of the display of the organization being undertaken on our behalf as citizens is a deep look into the psyche and morals of President Trump. Again, no conclusions are drawn. But for the fact that the title has been taken by another author, the book could have been entitled Fiasco.

About the title, itself, it is a double entendre. President Trump has spoken that power is fear. Perhaps meaning to achieve and keep power one must have others fear him. It could also mean one must be fearful in that this administration is so incompetent (and does not have the wherewithal to get corrected); we, the public should be fearful. If you are political this is a must read.

It is not the best read as the wriitng style is not conducive to a flowing read, and the story is choppy. Its contents and your understating of just who is our president is enlightening and, yes: Frightening.

3 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • English History Made Brief, Irreverent, and Pleasurable

  • By: Lacey Baldwin Smith
  • Narrated by: Peter Noble
  • Length: 9 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 579
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 521
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 521

Here at last is a history of England that is designed to entertain as well as inform and that will delight the armchair traveler, the tourist, or just about anyone interested in history. No people have engendered quite so much acclaim or earned so much censure as the English: extolled as the Athenians of modern times, yet hammered for their self-satisfaction and hypocrisy. But their history has been a spectacular one.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thoroughly enjoyable history

  • By Dennis K. on 11-23-17

Island's, Political and Monarchy's History

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

English History Made Brief, Irreverent, and Pleasurable, by Lacey Baldwin Smith, and Narrated by Peter Noble. If you are one who enjoys history, and if you are one who particularly finds our heritage in the English, of extra interest, this would be a good read for you. There is not much said on any subject but sufficiently said on ALL subjects of the history of England to amount make this as the title said a pleasure to listen to. It gives a good understanding of that magic land called England.

You will be amazed at how it managed to survive, and yet it has survived several dozens of time better than one should have anticipated. You will be fairly amazed to realized, it should have encompassed about one-third of France as well. Not from the French point of view though. Yet, this book lists the history of the island, tells about its politics and then goes back and gives you a second short running history of the monarchy. There seems to be much Smith does not like about its monarchs and politicians and there is no holding back. This is not Sir Winston Churchill’s History of the English Speaking Peoples, but not a bad listen to if you fit all the above criteria.

  • The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

  • By: Mark Twain
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,709
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,438
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,424

A natural storyteller and raconteur in his own right - just listen to Paddle Your Own Canoe and Gumption - actor, comedian, carpenter, and all-around manly man Nick Offerman ( Parks and Recreation) brings his distinctive baritone and a fine-tuned comic versatility to Twain's writing. In a knockout performance, he doesn't so much as read Twain's words as he does rejoice in them, delighting in the hijinks of Tom - whom he lovingly refers to as a "great scam artist" and "true American hero".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fall in Love All Over Again

  • By Doug - Audible on 07-05-17

Old Wives’ Tales and Boyhood

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, By: Mark Twain, Narrated by: Nick Offerman. When one gets to the core of the story it’s about how myths, or old wives’ tales mislead us. That is about every day folk’s beliefs, usually superstitious or erroneous, passed on by word of mouth as a piece of traditional wisdom. The myths are always absurd and lead the boys (and their parents) into troubles. A traditional Mark Twain theme was the lack of rational insight versus false pitch lines to confront life’s issues.

In a way, the success that reaches Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, is unexpected. Their luck in getting out of what they should not have gotten into is beyond belief. Yet, belief is not necessary to enjoy this unique look into boyhood. Oh yes, and girlhood in the form of Becky Thatcher, Tom’s true love. The Sawyer/Thatcher romance is modeled after the Twain/Olivia Landon romance, Samuel Clemons’ real-life wife.

This is not the monumental tale of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, but it is a pleasant tour of Americana. Yet, although not as severe as in Huck Finn, there is vehement racism presented, that is so harsh the book should be sold only to social researchers. Was this indicative of Mark Twain or was it his effort to reveal the cruelty of it? I believe he was attempting to show its horrors, but its depiction of the under-trodden is harsh.

  • Fascism

  • A Warning
  • By: Madeleine Albright
  • Narrated by: Madeleine Albright
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,002
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,822
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,798

At the end of the 1980s, when the Cold War ended, many, including former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, believed that democracy had triumphed politically once and for all. Yet nearly 30 years later, the direction of history no longer seems certain. A repressive and destructive force has begun to re-emerge on the global stage - sweeping across Europe, parts of Asia, and the United States - that to Albright, looks very much like fascism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Jean on 07-04-18

Why Do People Give Up Their Freedom

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-18

Fascism, A Warning. Written and spoken by Madeleine Albright. I had wrongly anticipated what I was purchasing; expecting another condemnation of Trump. Professor Albright is not a fan of Trump, and she does point out his flaws against her teaching, but this is a course on Fascism, not a political document written on behalf of the Democratic Party. Professor Albright, occupied a front row seat to the rise of Fascism, as an infant, a father who saw what was happening in Europe and moved his family away from the heinous effect of Fascism before they had to personally suffer, other than the loss of close family members. She, of course, was/is a professor of International Relations at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, and when not there served several presidents advising on diplomacy. She was also the first woman Secretary of State Under President Clinton. As a professor she has studied fascism, and as a diplomat had to face and negotiate American interests around fascist interests.

I expected a diatribe against Trump. Not so. This is a history course about fascism in the 20th and now 21st centuries. She explains how most fascist regimes, stumbled into being, what was their pitch to the public, and how they all argued for abuse of others, the outsiders. There are always plenty of people who want to hate others as a method of giving themselves feigned status against those to whom the hatred is cast. This is a brilliant breakdown of what fascism is, why it becomes popularized, how it sows the seeds of its own destruction and its inner workings. You will see that analysis applied to two dozen dictators from Mussolini, Hitler, Franco, and more to modern day tyrants, including Vladimir Putin, Viktor Orbán, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and compare them to persons such as Nelson Mandela and George W. Bush.

Oh yes, and she does have some comment on Trump.

  • The Plot to Destroy Democracy

  • How Putin and His Spies Are Undermining America and Dismantling the West
  • By: Malcolm Nance, Rob Reiner - foreword
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 12 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 678
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 611
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 609

In the greatest intelligence operation in the history of the world, Donald Trump was made president of the United States with the assistance of a foreign power. For the first time, The Plot to Destroy Democracy reveals the dramatic story of how blackmail, espionage, assassination, and psychological warfare were used by Vladimir Putin and his spy agencies to steal the 2016 US election. It will show how Russia and its fifth column allies tried to flip the cornerstones of democracy in order to reengineer the world political order that kept most of the world free since since 1945....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • OH NOOOO

  • By Becky on 07-18-18

Trump Ain’t No Johnny

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

The Plot to Destroy Democracy, How Putin and His Spies Are Undermining America and Dismantling the West. By: Malcolm Nance and Narrated by: Peter Ganim. Horror confronts our democracy. It comes to us in the form of Donald J. Trump.

First, I am a longtime admirer of our author, Malcolm Nance, listening to his tv appearances and listening to him talk: his patriotism, his knowledge of covert operations, his past protecting our nation and its people (brown, white, yellow and red), and how well he lays out an issue and provides how the intelligence community takes these ominous problems and work for all our benefit. Yet, this is the only book or other writing of Mr. Nances that I have read, and I am again, impressed with the clear cogent and inciteful information on a jeopardy our nation faces. Because, if Mr. Nance’s information is correct, Mr. Trump has sold his soul for the presidency. Trump is Webster and Putin is the Devil. (The story by Stephen Vincent Benét.)

First Mr. Nance educates you about Russian intelligence, how it operations, how it organizes and deploys. Next, Mr. Nance provides you with Trump’s history, the provides you with how that history fits into Russian strategy. Then he reports on known facts that have become public of Trump Russian contacts and compares those encounters to Trump and his frailties and Putin and his strengths. Frightening.

There is a negative in reading or listening to this history. Mr. Nance provides you with endless, and voluminous reported facts that throw the weight of probabilities to the conclusion that Trump has conspired. I do mean a voluminous number of facts. If you wade through those facts; you will be disgusted the Congress has not protected us better from a compromised president.

Magnificent read.

And the Devil jumped up on a hickory stump and said,
"Boy [Johnny] let me tell you what:
I guess you didn't know it, but I'm a fiddle player too,
And if you'd care to take a dare,
I'll make a bet with you
Now you play a pretty good fiddle,
Boy, but give the Devil his due
I bet a fiddle of gold against your soul
'Cause I think I'm better than you"

Charlie Daniels, Devil Went Down to Georgia. Unfortunately, Trump ain’t no Johnny.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Assault on Intelligence

  • By: Michael V. Hayden
  • Narrated by: Michael V. Hayden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 710
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 658
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 654

In the face of a president who lobs accusations without facts, evidence, or logic, truth tellers are under attack. Meanwhile, the world order is teetering on the brink. North Korea is on the verge of having a nuclear weapon that could reach all of the United States, Russians have mastered a new form of information warfare that undercuts democracy, and the role of China in the global community remains unclear. There will always be value to experience and expertise, devotion to facts, humility in the face of complexity, and a respect for ideas, but in this moment they seem more important, and more endangered, than they've ever been.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Edifying

  • By Jean on 07-13-18

Being a Replicator to the Russian Strikes at Us

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-11-18

The Assault on Intelligence, written and read by Michael V. Hayden. Gen. Hayden measures the Trump person, campaign, and presidency against Trump’s words, actions and results; against a timeline of coming down the escalator, through the 2016 election campaign, transition and presidency. He detects the man’s inner workings and frailties, its effect on international relations and the intelligence community, and what that may (and has) mean (meant) for the American way of values and our position in the world. His prognosis for America under Trump is not hopeful.

Gen. Hayden is an intellectual, and his analysis here is brilliant. He provides a situation that has occurred by the Trump march to his presidency, explains the caliber of spoken words and resulting actions by the candidate/president, and outlines its effect on our society and position in the world order. He then usually, introduces a social science study by a professor, writer, or Nobel laureate, as a guideline for measuring Trump’s history and displays Trump and his effects by applying the study's analysis to Trumps speach or acts. He then explains the results Trump is having on United States security and world order. If you are wondering about Trump the fiasco, this is a good read to help you understand.

One key point brought out in this work. It is beyond chance that every degenerative accusation made by Trump is always matched in time by the same untruthful, but hatred full assertion made by the Russians. Theirs attack on America is replicative with Trump's derogatons. Why is that?

Gen. Hayden tells you when Trump is doing well, but that is minuscule compared to all the harm Trump is doing to our economics, safety, and influence in the world. This book is magnificent as a learning and assessment tool. Read it soon though. Its facts are becoming old history.

  • Facts and Fears

  • By: Trey Brown, James R. Clapper
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 18 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,254
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,141

When he stepped down in January 2017 as the fourth US Director of National Intelligence, James Clapper had been President Obama's senior intelligence advisor for six and a half years, longer than his three predecessors combined. He led the US Intelligence Community through a period that included the raid on Osama bin Laden, the Benghazi attack, the leaks of Edward Snowden, and Russia's influence operation on the 2016 US election.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Speaking Straight, Unbiased Truth to Power

  • By Cynthia on 05-29-18

Tea Leaves to Read Where We Are

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

Facts and Fears, by Trey Brown and James R. Clapper, and read by Mark Bramhall. This is one of a plethora of books talking about the jeopardy of the Russian presence on the political scene by way of electronic and social communication warfare. This one is by James Clapper. Although this book tells you what you need to know about the Russian subversive activities it is much more. It is a primer to the United States’ place in the world of espionage.

Mr. Clapper is an institutional signal professional. From Vietnam to the 2016 presidential election cycle he was on the front line of IC – intelligence communication or community activities. Think, espionage investigation and provocateur on behalf of the United States. This book though talks only of his experiences in the protection of the United States. He is a retired lieutenant general in the United States Air Force and is the former Director of National Intelligence. Clapper has held several key positions within the United States Intelligence Community. He served as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) from 1992 until 1995. He was the first director of defense intelligence within the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and simultaneously the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence. He served as the director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) from September 2001 until June 2006. On June 5, 2010, President Barack Obama nominated Clapper to replace Dennis C. Blair as United States Director of National Intelligence.

Wow. Quite a resume. Mr. Clapper is a hero in my mind. He has severed this nation and provided it with protection against those who would diminish our way of life and freedoms. That includes Russia, Isis, and Isis like organizations and other third-party antagonists. It is not as brilliant of a read as you would find in a John Steinbeck novel, but it is a read that gives perspective on all the newsworthy occurrences since the mid-1960s through January 2016. He has been there for every international and domestic intelligence escapade and this book is an inside tell on each of those happenings from his position in the intelligence community.

This book though has one overwhelmingly apparent tell on Trump and the North Korean interchange. Gen. Clapper had spent much time in his early career surveilling the North Koreans. When President Obama needed an emissary to talk with them about the return of two American captives he sent Gen. Clapper. The seemingly childlike innocents with which the North Koreans speak, and their lethal underpinnings on life and living in the North Korean society really makes one shiver with concern. Concern for the meeting that took place between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un. The North Koreans praise their leader to the hilt and likely did the same to Trump about himself while condemning everything else American and repeatedly ask for what they want as a child. They will say anything, to get you to agree to normalize relations. They have no commitment to their promises. It is a total freak-out when you think of Trump’s reported frailties and the North Korean style of negotiation. One would expect nothing but a complete misunderstanding between the participants.

Gen. Clapper does excoriate President Trump in the end. He also, though, lays a framework from which to begin to understand the man. That said, there is nothing admirable about the subject for which he leaves us tea leaves to read.

This book is highly recommended for those that want to reminisce about history and see it from a spy chief’s patriot’s point of view.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • From Cold War to Hot Peace

  • An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia
  • By: Michael McFaul
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 20 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 201
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 183

As President Barack Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, Michael McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. And then, as US ambassador to Russia from 2012 to 2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting, hopeful moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency. This riveting inside account combines history and memoir to tell the full story of US-Russia relations from the fall of the Soviet Union to the new rise of the hostile, paranoid Russian president.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • From Russia With Love

  • By J.B. on 08-03-18

From Russia With Love

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-18

From Cold War to Hot Peace, An American Ambassador in Putin’s Russia, written by Michael McFaul, and read by L. J. Ganser. This is a wonderful and complete retelling of international foreign policy during the Obama presidency. You learn how issues become the focus of an administration, at least those issues in which Professor McFaul was involved, how the problems are defined, and how those delineations depend more on the prior learning or experience of the president and his experts rather than some mathematical formula. Hint: Learn the meaning of the word gestalt before you take on this read.

Now, my recommendation is not to purchase and read (listen) to the book unless you are a learned and avid political scientist or international historian with an interest in inter-nation dealings. This is not a titillating book in and of itself. This is though, a truly learned outlay of what happened, why, what worked, and what did not.

The subject matters covered were, Prof. McFaul’s education and early professorial years, the Russian Reset at the beginning of the Obama presidency, the Arab Spring, the Libya conflict, Prof. McFaul’s return to Russia as Ambassador, Russian civic unrest, Putin’s return to the Russian Federacy presidency, the taking of Crimea and the unrest in the Ukrainian, in almost all those reviews, not only do we get a readout on Obama’s actions and thoughts, but we also get a readout on Putin’s position, and a deep set of suppositions as to what might have been Putin’s thoughts and perspective; as well as his objectives. I found particularly interesting, how Putin filled the Russian people, with venality with which Putin poisons the Russian people with hatred for others. Something like our present presidency here in the U.S., but in Putin’s case he controls all forms of information to his people. Fascinating. Oh yes, and there is a long discussion on Professor McFaul’s use of social media, including Twitter, a never before used diplomatic tool was a kick.

I came to this book having great respect for the analysis of Professor McFaul. After the read, my appreciation of his gift of political analysis has only increased. He put the book together as a story, which does not read like a novel, but rather a history of his interchange with Russia and its beloved people. It is an analysis of what happened and perhaps why.

At the end of the book, a little over one hour of reading, Professor McFaul provides a wrap up of what is the status of U.S. Russian affairs, how we got here, what should we do from here. Those of you that have followed the Professor will be surprised at his new-found perspective. The book is worth reading (if you are a political science nerd). Its last hour plus is essential if you want to know where we go from here in U.S. vs. Russia. Nevertheless, I still intend to re-read all my Dostoyevsky.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Dombey and Son

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: David Timson
  • Length: 39 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 401
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 374
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 371

Dombey and Son is vintage Dickens and explores the classic themes of betrayal, cruelty and deceit. Dombey's dysfunctional relationships are painted against a backdrop of social unrest in industrialized London, which is populated by a host of fascinating and memorable secondary characters. The complete and unabridged novel is brought spectacularly to life by veteran reader David Timson.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Hidden Dickens Gem

  • By eileen on 01-15-12

Words Titillate, Magnificent Reading, Poor Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-18

Dombey and Son, by: Charles Dickens, Narrated by: David Timson. I am a profound fan of 19th Century English literature; and of course, I have read many of Dicken’s writings. I actually never heard of Dombey and Son, when I went looking for a new Dickens work. I figured, what can possibly go wrong?

The answer I presumed was nothing. I was wrong. I am here to tell you this work has a flaw. The storyline never involves the reader; it goes on and on and never gets you interested in the characters or their trials and tribulations. It’s bad actor characters are numerous, and their evils are told in a long and boring interplay amongst the actors. The plot is without merit and it rolls on forever and ever. 36 hours of little story worth reading. Yet . . .

It’s a Dickens work and its use of words are brilliant. After reading the first five chapters, and taking in the traditional Dickens word salads, I was like Snoopy, dancing in the air as my feet wriggled in rhythm to Dickens words ringing in my soul.

Even better, was the reading by David Timson. I never read anything by him before, but he is a master. Each character had their own unique voice inflections, vocabulary, cadence and tone and Timson presented each with magnificence. The story was bad; but the read was great just waiting for each character to come to me with a basket of Dickens words to be delivered by Timson’s performances.

Dickens plots are always long connections and interconnections of his characters and the development of his characters are perhaps his greatest genius. I enjoy them but for me, the most exciting part of reading (or listening) to a Dickens is swirling, tumbling, and just plain darn enjoying how he puts words together to involve you in his stories. Beautiful, and made even better with the Timson read.

  • Economics, 3rd Edition

  • By: Timothy Taylor, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Timothy Taylor
  • Length: 18 hrs and 36 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 974
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 849

Economic issues are active in our lives every day. However, when the subject of economics comes up in conversation or on the news, we can find ourselves longing for a more sophisticated understanding of the fundamentals of economics. These 36 lectures will help you think about and discuss economic issues that affect you and the nation every day-interest rates, unemployment, personal investing, budget deficits, globalization, and many more-with a greater level of knowledge and sophistication.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Econmics, 3rd Edition

  • By Linda Chan on 09-18-13

This is It; Best Presentation of Economics Ever

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-18

Economics, 3rd Edition, The Great Courses, by Timothy Taylor. For those who have a need or simply a want to understand the science of economics; this is the course. Its content is complete, told in a mind provoking and subject captivating manner. Finish the book and you will have a good working understanding of economics.

I have always been dismayed that after finishing my other degrees I did not then get another degree in economics. I believe mastering economics would have been helpful. (My last alma matter told me it was time to leave campus and work for a while. That was a stupid guidance, and I was stupid to take the advice.) As a result, I have overread what I can in economics. This book is the best source of putting all the elemental factors into one place, but more importantly, explained the science in a brilliantly clear and understanding manner. By the time you finish the course, you will have built in your mind all one needs to know about micro and macro studies, from supply and demand, historic economic philosophies, financial markets, banking, and domestic and international trade. Really, each lecture is so well explained a slow-witted novice will undoubtedly get the concepts.

Two negatives. I did not like Professor Taylor's tonal delivery. That is the most minor of negatives, though. A second negative is that this course may be approaching ten years old (even though the release date says 2013). That is because his reference to societal economic trends goes no further than the mid-2000s. Prof. Taylor was so good, I wanted to hear his comments on latter-day happenings.

This is definitely worth a listen even if you, like me, would have preferred a different speaker; but then you would not have this man’s genius delivering the knowledge you seek.