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  • Go Set a Watchman

  • A Novel
  • By: Harper Lee
  • Narrated by: Reese Witherspoon
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14,312
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,122
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,089

An historic literary event: the publication of a newly discovered novel, the earliest known work from Harper Lee, the beloved, best-selling author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic To Kill a Mockingbird. Originally written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman was the novel Harper Lee first submitted to her publishers before To Kill a Mockingbird. Assumed to have been lost, the manuscript was discovered in late 2014.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • To Kill A Mockingbird vs Go Set A Watchman

  • By Sara on 07-15-15

Probably easier to read than hear

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

Would you consider the audio edition of Go Set a Watchman to be better than the print version?

I was excited that Reese Witherspoon was narrating so I preordered this book, but between the old school southern jargon and the time-hopping, I had a lot of trouble following the story and even rewound a few chapters just to clarify some things. I didn't attempt the print edition, but I feel it may have been a little easier, at least for a northerner like myself.

Any additional comments?

I found myself bored a lot of the time listening to this story. I fell in love with these characters in To Kill A Mockingbird, and I was certainly walking into this story with higher expectations than I otherwise would have. I have to say that I hated every character in this story right up to the end, but when I really give myself pause to think about it, the fact is we generally all have a certain way of seeing the world when we're small, and it's not until we are older that we can really see things in the unglamorous state they truly are. With that in mind, the message of Watchmen is a lot more bearable.

Eventually we grow up, and it's always disappointing when life doesn't turn out as we thought it would. I guess I was just hoping to feel more inspired than reality checked.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Freakonomics

  • Revised Edition
  • By: Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
  • Narrated by: Stephen J. Dubner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,873
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,696
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,696

Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much-heralded scholar who studies the riddles of everyday life, from cheating and crime to sports and child-rearing, and whose conclusions turn the conventional wisdom on its head. Thus the new field of study contained in this audiobook: Freakonomics. Levitt and co-author Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives: how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good, but be careful

  • By Shackleton on 07-03-08

I appreciate the concept

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

Any additional comments?

Although I love this clever approach of comparing things that seem so unrelatable and finding the similarities that you wouldn't ordinarily see, the statistic based approach wasn't exactly a reliable leg to stand on in my eyes. It isn't that I doubt how thoroughly they researched these topics, it's that I don't think statistics alone can tell a whole story. I was intrigued by the ideas, and I did enjoy the subject matter.It was a decent read, but I wouldn't actively recommend it.

28 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science

  • By: Robert Sapolsky, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: The Great Courses
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,020
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,014

Understanding our humanity - the essence of who we are - is one of the deepest mysteries and biggest challenges in modern science. Why do we have bad moods? Why are we capable of having such strange dreams? How can metaphors in our language hold such sway on our actions? As we learn more about the mechanisms of human behavior through evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthropology, and other related fields, we're discovering just how intriguing the human species is.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Human And Loving It!

  • By Gillian on 07-28-15

Enjoyed the ideas, but wouldn't listen twice

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

What did you love best about Being Human: Life Lessons from the Frontiers of Science?

There were times where I felt I was hearing some interesting concepts, and looking at things from a perspective I hadn't previously explored.

Any additional comments?

Professor Sapolsky was certainly interested and well learned in his subject matter, however I felt like there was a little too basic an approach to these lectures. Between the title and length, I knew it wouldn't be comprehensive by any means, but I did expect a little more than just a few different ways to look at things.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of Racing in the Rain

  • By: Garth Stein
  • Narrated by: Christopher Evan Welch
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,056
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,191
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,193

Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enzo (because he's so wize) for president.

  • By Lora on 06-17-08

Heartbreaking in the Best Way

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Absolutely, and I have done so! Not only is the story itself compelling, but to hear it told from the perspective of the dog was incredible. If you are a dog lover, it is like hearing everything you think your dog is thinking brought to life.

Which scene was your favorite?

The ending. It brought it all together for me.

Any additional comments?

I wasn't expecting the story to be quite what it was, but from the very beginning you are so compelled by the life of this family and how they all come together. In the span of Enzo's (the dog) life, you see his caretaker Denny go from a single man and then into a family man, with struggles, triumphs, and all in between. This book is totally unique to anything else I've read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Economics, 3rd Edition

  • By: Timothy Taylor, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Timothy Taylor
  • Length: 18 hrs and 36 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,051
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 935
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 917

Economic issues are active in our lives every day. However, when the subject of economics comes up in conversation or on the news, we can find ourselves longing for a more sophisticated understanding of the fundamentals of economics. These 36 lectures will help you think about and discuss economic issues that affect you and the nation every day-interest rates, unemployment, personal investing, budget deficits, globalization, and many more-with a greater level of knowledge and sophistication.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Econmics, 3rd Edition

  • By Linda Chan on 09-18-13

From a math hater, highly recomended

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

Would you listen to Economics, 3rd Edition again? Why?

Absolutely, I learned so much about controlling finances and maneuvering the stock market, retirement tips, etc.

Any additional comments?

I had just got a job as a bank teller, so I decided it might be prudent to learn a little about the financial industry. To my surprise, Professor Taylor was an absolute joy to listen to. He had a way of explaining things that appealed to a layman like myself, and I walked away the better for it.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Customs of the World: Using Cultural Intelligence to Adapt, Wherever You Are

  • By: David Livermore, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: David Livermore
  • Length: 11 hrs and 59 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,650
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,471
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,468

Based on groundbreaking research, these 24 lectures address dynamics and customs related to working, socializing, dining, marriage and family - all the areas necessary to help you function with a greater level of respect and effectiveness wherever you go. You'll also encounter practical tips and crucial context for greeting, interacting with, and even managing people from other parts of the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Quite possibly my favorite of The Great Courses

  • By Quaker on 09-17-13

We are all more alike than I would have thought

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. I thought Professor Livermore had a great way of explaining his topic, and I loved how he was able to point out all our differences while also proving how similar every culture can be.

What’s an idea from the book that you will remember?

The boy from the beginning that reminded the Professor of American teens and the way he responded to being told so by saying that just because they looked the same, doesn't mean they are the same.

Any additional comments?

People can all behave in a way that looks the same on the surface, when in the end their values are completely different and vice versa. A very insightful look on what drives and motivates people around the globe.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of Negotiating the Best Deal

  • By: Seth Freeman, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Seth Freeman
  • Length: 12 hrs and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,503
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,192
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,173

The course is organized around a mnemonic device, developed by Professor Freeman, that can serve in any negotiation situation. Called "I FORESAW IT," this indispensable framework guides you in assembling the strongest possible case, showing you how to evaluate such factors as creative options, independent criteria, and your best alternative to a negotiated agreement.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • What One Should Have Learned as a Child but Didn't

  • By Mike T Walterman on 05-08-15

Some really helpful tactics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

Any additional comments?

Professor Freeman has a great voice, but he is a little slow sometimes, and often too encouraging for my taste. I appreciate the idea, but I thought there would be a little more to the method and a little less motivational speak.

Overall, I do feel like I learned some great tactics to handle real world situations, and have been able to employ a few of them, for example a pay raise, and saved friendship.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century

  • By: Jeffrey Rosen, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Jeffrey Rosen
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 485
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 428
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 428

Although the courts have struggled to balance the interests of individuals, businesses, and law enforcement, the proliferation of intrusive new technologies puts many of our presumed freedoms in legal limbo. For instance, it's not hard to envision a day when websites such as Facebook or Google Maps introduce a feature that allows real-time tracking of anyone you want, based on face-recognition software and ubiquitous live video feeds.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining & thought-provoking. Highly recommend

  • By Joseph on 10-27-13

A lot to think about

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

What made the experience of listening to Privacy, Property, and Free Speech: Law and the Constitution in the 21st Century the most enjoyable?

Considering rights and liberties that are very quickly falling into grey area within the law.

Any additional comments?

Some points ought to be taken lightly, for instance when Professor Rosen is talking about what rights an officer has to search and seize. I have cops that are friends, and there is a bit of scare tactic in some of the Professor's points, but overall, as a society there needs to be a very real and immediate discussion on where to take the law in the wake of ever dominating technology.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • American Sniper

  • The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History
  • By: Chris Kyle, Scott McEwan, Jim DeFelice
  • Narrated by: John Pruden
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,684
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,698
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,702

From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyles kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared Kyle so much they named him al-Shaitan ("the devil") and placed a bounty on his head.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's been censored by the publisher

  • By K9NSP on 10-21-17

Never thought I'd appreciate a Texan accent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

Where does American Sniper rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Very high

What did you like best about this story?

I loved how deep the story went in to what it means emotionally to be in our armed forces. I have such an appreciation for our military, and now I feel closer to what these men and women experience when they defend our freedoms.

What about John Pruden’s performance did you like?

That Texas twang was something I never thought I'd care for, but by the time I was halfway through this book, it became one of my favorite accents. The Taya sections were a bit jarring at first, but overall, very well spoken.

Any additional comments?

Thank you will never be enough to all the men and women who devote their lives to the safety of their countrymen, but know you all have mine.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Story of Human Language

  • By: John McWhorter, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 18 hrs and 15 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,326
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,022
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,981

Language defines us as a species, placing humans head and shoulders above even the most proficient animal communicators. But it also beguiles us with its endless mysteries, allowing us to ponder why different languages emerged, why there isn't simply a single language, how languages change over time and whether that's good or bad, and how languages die out and become extinct.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You'll Never Look at Languages the Same Way Again

  • By SAMA on 03-11-14

Very interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-15

Would you listen to The Story of Human Language again? Why?

I would, because I thought Professor McWhorter touched on some really interesting points in terms of how we think about language. Specifically, I'd like to listen to the chapter on Creole again.

What about Professor John McWhorter’s performance did you like?

I liked his enthusiasm.

Any additional comments?

There was a lot of information, and I thought Professor McWhorter did an excellent job in touching on a wide array of languages. I now have a huge appreciation for the evolution of language that I didn't have before. If you hate the direction modern English is moving in, listen to this series. It will definitely have an impact on your perspective!