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  • Clans War

  • Way of the Shaman Series, Book 7
  • By: Vasily Mahanenko
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 16 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,213
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,152
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,149

Not long ago, Daniel Mahan, known to everyone as Shaman Mahan, thought that he had taken his sixth and final step in the Barliona gameworld. Yet life has other ideas. The Corporation decides to resurrect the Lord of Shadow and his entire host. The Corporation's CEO personally pushes the reset button. Geranika and his Dragon of Shadow spring back to life as, meanwhile, the Corporation makes an offer the Shaman can't refuse. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love the series

  • By Dewey Gough on 05-23-18

Wow this story has gone down hill. Disapointed!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

I’ve listened to all of these books. I’m done here. If he comes out with any more I will pass . The story is a jumbled mess. I kinda felt like the author had all these plot points and couldn’t figure out how to make it work so he just cut it off at the re is almost no LITRPG here. No real quests. Just a weak story about how he ended up in jail in the first place because. Which, made no sense at all. Just yuck.

  • Fool's Quest

  • Book II of the Fitz and the Fool trilogy
  • By: Robin Hobb
  • Narrated by: Elliot Hill
  • Length: 33 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,964
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,766
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,748

The harrowing adventures of FitzChivalry Farseer and his enigmatic friend, the Fool, continue in Robin Hobb's triumphant follow-up to Fool's Assassin. But Fool's Quest is more than just a sequel. With the artistry and imagination her fans have come to expect, Hobb builds masterfully on all that has gone before, revealing devastating secrets and shocking conspiracies that cast a dark shadow over the history of Fitz and his world - a shadow that now stretches to darken all future hope.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book, great series, misses the old reader

  • By Andrew on 08-20-15

Great Narrator, 25 hours too long. (Mild Spoilers)

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-15

Let me start by saying Kudo's to Elliot Hill. He does a great job in this series. He's not the best narrator. He doesn't rank up there with Scott Brick, Oliver Wyman, Stefan R., or Michael Kramer. But he does a great job none the less. For me, in an audio book, the narrator makes or breaks the book. Regardless of the story. I couldn't finish the Malazan books after they switched narrators, and it deeply saddens. me.

Fools Quest is a great story, that's 25 hours (out of 60) too long. I felt myself listening to Fitz thinking the same thing over and over. He must blame himself about Bee's abduction (which happened in book 1) over 100 times. The same way each time. I had to resist the urge to fast forward because I liked the story allot. And when they FINALLY reach their destination, which was fascinating (The new trading town by the traveling stone in the north by the skill road) there was an entire hour of it.. Then that's it.

To make things worse, there was no ending. The book just kind of... Stopped.. In the middle of a story. There wasn't even a cliffhanger. I'm guessing this is part 1 of an 120 hour book to be honest.

If Robin Hobb (Pseudo-name, real name is Margaret Astrid Lindholm Ogden) reads these, you weave a wonderful tale.. It's just WAY too verbose. I noticed it in the other 8 or 9 Farseer novels I've read, but it was not this bad.

If you made this story 40 hours, I have no doubt I would have given this 4.5 stars. I know the story could easily have been told in this amount of time. But hours of listen to Fitz blame him self and Bee complain about being cold is just...... Not entertaining.

If you're a fan of Fitz and the Fool, pick this up, but be prepared for a long trying listen, with no satisfaction at the end. But the journey, which is woven in between the almost monotonous story line, is worth listening too.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • A Crucible of Souls

  • The Sorcery Ascendant Sequence, Book 1
  • By: Mitchell Hogan
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 18 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,360
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,928
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,926

When Caldan’s parents are brutally slain, he is raised by monks and taught the arcane mysteries of sorcery. Vowing to discover for himself who his parents really were, and what led to their violent end, he is thrust into the unfamiliar chaos of city life. With nothing to his name but a pair of mysterious heirlooms and a handful of coins, he must prove his talent to earn an apprenticeship with a guild of sorcerers. But he soon learns the world outside the monastery is a darker place than he ever imagined, and his treasured sorcery has disturbing depths. As a shadowed evil manipulates the unwary and forbidden powers are unleashed, Caldan is plunged into an age-old conflict that brings the world to the edge of destruction.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Bloody Ancestors

  • By alton Styron on 10-17-16

Took a chance, hit a home run!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-15

Simply, I'm thrilled to find this. I really like Oliver Wyman as a narrator, listening to his narration of both the Monster Hunter series and Brandon Sanderson's Legion series. So I searched for other books that he narrated and found this gem. The author is not as polished as some, and his theme isn't original, but the book works, and really works well. This is definitely high or epic fantasy, and I'm writing this while book 2 is downloading.

Why you should read this:
The Characters: Character progression in this book is very well done. You care about the ones you are supposed to care about, and are outraged at the ones you are not. There are is a lot of mysteries and secrets about each of them, and you enjoy each morsel of the authors puzzles as he gives them to you.

The Magic System: Borrowed heavily from Patrick Rothfus in my opinion, but it too works, and works very well. The way magic is done in the book is logical, and it's not 'wiggle your fingers and shoot a fireball' magic. What is known in the authors world of magic, is known to the reader, but it's very obvious that a lot about magic was lost during an event he calls 'the shattering'.

The Pace: I dislike reading short books. I want a good long juicy novel, and that's what I got. The pacing is right, and nothing really drags on too long. At 21+ hours of novel, you are getting your credits worth.

The Narrator: Oliver is great. He has some great voices, and I really enjoyed everything I've listened by him. If you haven't listened to the Monster Hunter series (Which is the worst name for a series, but one of my favorites), or Legion, they are worth the credits as well. As a matter of fact, I think Legion is 5 bucks, worth just spending the money instead of using a credit. But I digress.

In short: If you are fans of Patrick Rothfus, Brandon Sanderson, Robert Jordan, or Tolkien, then this series will fit you like a glove. Do yourself a favor and pick it up.

133 of 141 people found this review helpful

  • Divergent

  • By: Veronica Roth
  • Narrated by: Emma Galvin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,920
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,507
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,708

In Beatrice Prior's dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue - Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is - she can't have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's not for me. Loved it anyway.

  • By Grant on 05-24-12

Dystiopian without Zombies or Apocalypse

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-04-14

The Divergent series (which I will sum up in this review instead of writing a separate one for each book) helped me decide that I do like Dystopian Fiction. (If Brandon's Steelheart didn't push me over the edge). The books follow the story of a girl named 'Tris' and her friend 'Four'.ion These are nicknames, of course, because in this society, you are tested at 16 via injected with a serum that puts you in a trance induced simulation and you are offered scenarios. How you react will eliminate certain factions from your choices The factions are Abnegation (Selfless), Erudite (Intellect), Dauntless (brave), Amity (Peaceful), Candor (Honesty). I found it odd that 4 of the 5 are virtues.

But low and behold, sometimes the tests are inconclusive. The testee makes choices that don't narrow down your faction choices. These people are known as Divergent, and since we are in a dystopian world, that must mean that Divergent people must be hunted and killed, and why? Well It's a secret.. If you're lucky, the person who tests you knows the Divergent secret hand shake and will help hide your results.

While the story was good enough to make me chug through all 3 books in 2 weeks, the writing style did not lead to a good translation of Audiobooks. It was told in first person... First person that hits you like a Mack Truck Her's an example

"I walked down the hall. I saw Four. I told Four hello. He said "Hello Tris". We walked down the hall together. We saw a computer. Four went to hack into it. While I waited, I watched him. He is hansom'.

You get the picture. The third book, which is told from both Tris and Four's perspective, helps with the problem, but it's the major flaw in the series. This didn't chafe me as bad as the "He said She said" problem that some books have, but it did become distracting to me. Luckily, Emma Galvin did a great job with the narration.

The pacing of the series is rather nice, and by the time I got to the parts that started explaining what was really going on, it was predictable, but I honestly didn't mind.

The characters stay true to their natures throughout the series, and for me, that's important. They are all young, and they all mature through the books, but I never felt like any of them did things against their nature

So, I'll rank this one high in the dystopian fantasy genre, and if your looking for a dystopian series that does not include Zombie Outbreaks or apocalyptic events, then this will satisfy you

  • Words of Radiance

  • The Stormlight Archive, Book 2
  • By: Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer, Kate Reading
  • Length: 48 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 47,662
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 44,590
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 44,563

In that first volume, we were introduced to the remarkable world of Roshar, a world both alien and magical, where gigantic hurricane-like storms scour the surface every few days and life has adapted accordingly. Roshar is shared by humans and the enigmatic, humanoid Parshendi, with whom they are at war.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Book !!; no let down- "Words of Radiance" shines

  • By Don Gilbert on 03-08-14

Book 2 answers so much, then leaves you with more!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-14

I am beginning to have a love/hate relationship with this series.

The love comes from how most of Brandon's book ties together in subtle ways. He has a cosmere designed, where The Stormlight Archive, Mistborn, and many other of his books are all in the same universe. If your interested, you can search for a web site called the 17th shard to learn more about that.

The hate comes from the waiting. By chapter 8, I had learned so much of the mysterious Spren, Shadspere (The spooky realm that Shallan visited at the end of book 1), the Radiants, the Void Bringers... I was just giddy with the answers to how things worked. By the end of the book, I now have different questions, and it will be another year of agonizing wait, at least, before book 3 comes out. But none of this really has anything to do with the review.

In Book 1, I loved Kaladin, liked Dalinar, and was a little annoyed at Shallan. She seemed whiny to me. The book featured flashbacks from Kaladin's childhood, and how he got to where the book started.

This book, I loved Shallan, liked Dalinar, and was annoyed with Kaladin. He was, again, whiny. This book features flashbacks of Shallan, and her back story, which was hinted to in book 1, was amazing. I loved her as a child. She was a rock to her family, and while the tragedy that set her journey in motion is blanked in her mind (she is lying to herself, and has blocked out the memories), it is unfortunately predictable. But I didn't mind that at all.

Dalinar's character was not as amazing in this book, but I think Brandon didn't want him to outshine Shallan. He take a step back from the front lines and takes a more political role in the book.

Kaladin.... Well, I just didn't understand. At the end of book one, he said the first ideals of the lost radiance and became infused with enormous power. They are spelled out in the first book: "Life before Death, Strength before Weakness, Journey before Destination".

Life before death - The Radiant seeks to defend life, always. He never kills unnecessarily, and never risks his own life for frivolous reasons. Living is harder than dying. The Radiant's duty is to live.

Strength before weakness - All men are weak at some time in their lives. The Radiant protects those who are weak, and uses his strength for others. Strength does not make one capable of rule; it makes one capable of service.

Journey before destination - There are always several ways to achieve a goal. Failure is preferable to winning through unjust means. Protecting ten innocents is not worth killing one. In the end, all men die. How you lived will be far more important to the Almighty than what you accomplished.

He spends half of book 2 'conflicted', knowing that a member of nobility is going to be assassinated and ponders on whether or not it is right. Syl begs him to not let it happen, and Kal see's that she's starting to lose herself and forget things. He know's it's his conflict that's causing it. But even that doesn't help him make up his mind. Not in his character at all. Watching Kaladin fully explore his powers (especially where he's trying to learn how to run up and down walls) were a very fun part of the book and helped distract from the conflict.

With that being said, a very solid book. I don't want to spoil anything, but if you haven't read Warbreaker before this, read it, because there's a tie in that is fantastic.

While not a perfect book, it deserved to be #1 on the NYT best seller list it's first week. I am a Sanderson fan for life, and once you get into how his books tie together you will be too.

3 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • House of Chains

  • Malazan Book of the Fallen, Book 4
  • By: Steven Erikson
  • Narrated by: Michael Page
  • Length: 35 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,507
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,279
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,277

In Northern Genabackis, a raiding party of savage tribal warriors descends from the mountains into the southern flatlands. Their intention is to wreak havoc amongst the despised lowlanders, but for the one named Karsa Orlong, it marks the beginning of what will prove to be an extraordinary destiny.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Ralph Lister is missed

  • By Hal on 12-28-13

New Narrator ruins experience.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-13

Malazan Book of the Fallen is one of the most complex Epic Fantasy series every written. I listened to book one, and book two, then book 3. When I listened to book three, everything clicked. I went back and listened to the series again from the beginning, and this vast world is amazing. Gods walking among men, warrens, magic.. I could go on and on.. Ralph Lister was amazing. And now we have Michael Page... Who I've never heard narrate before... And to be blunt, all his voices are the same voice, with different variances of 'grate' to it. And I couldn't concentrate on the book. I couldn't connect to the characters. I was sad to look on Brilliance Audio's website to see the rest of the 10 book series will be released over the next 3 years, and they all have this new narrator. I've never reviewed a book where I focused on the narration before, but wow. This world is too rich to go from someone who narrates a character like Fiddler with a very fast, witty voice... Then have the have the same character turn into a gruffy sounding soldier who just grunts.

I'm just... Disappointed.

76 of 80 people found this review helpful

  • Rise of Empire

  • Riyria Revelations, Volume 2
  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 26 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,800
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15,554
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,542

Best-selling author Michael J. Sullivan’s mesmerizing Riyria Revelations series has found a welcome home with fans of magic, clashing swords, and daring heroes. This second volume finds Royce and Hadrian on a quest to enlist the southern Nationalists to aid the ever-weakening kingdom of Melengar. Royce suspects an ancient wizard is manipulating them all, but to find the truth he’ll have to decipher Hadrian’s past—a past Hadrian wants to keep secret.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great continuation of the first book. Tons of fun!

  • By Adnan on 05-30-12

I would give this series 6 stars if I could

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-13

Would you listen to Rise of Empire again? Why?

Yes, without question. There is lots of foreshadowing in the series, and it's obvious the author had the story planned out from the beginning. To me, a good book has a great story, but a great book has great characters.. And you can't help but care about the characters in this book.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Rise of Empire?

There's no one moment, but I will say that it's very satisfying to have hunches about the main characters, Royce and Hadrian, and find out that your hunches are right. The author gives very little away about their background, and just gives nuggets as you go. Enjoy this, it's one of the best elements of the book.

What about Tim Gerard Reynolds’s performance did you like?

I owe him an apology. I bashed him on his performance in his performance on against all things ending, and I didn't realize he was narrating this series till after I bought the first book. He is BRILLIANT. His voices are fantastic, and I'm now a huge fan.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Consequences.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • A Memory of Light

  • Wheel of Time, Book 14
  • By: Robert Jordan, Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer, Kate Reading
  • Length: 41 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 19,672
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 17,977
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 17,992

Since 1990, when Robert Jordan’s The Wheel of Time® burst on the world with its first book, The Eye of the World, listeners have been anticipating the final scenes of this extraordinary saga, which has sold over 40 million copies in over 32 languages. When Robert Jordan died in 2007, all feared that these concluding scenes would never be written. But working from notes and partials left by Jordan, established fantasy writer Brandon Sanderson stepped in to complete the masterwork.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Finally we have closure!

  • By Cliff on 08-29-13

Please, read the book before you review it...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-08-13

I love Robert Jordon and Brandon Sanderson too. But how can people be giving the audio book reviews, when it's 45.5 hours long and it's been out around 10 hours?

Please.. Read it first then review it.

79 of 110 people found this review helpful

  • Cold Days

  • The Dresden Files, Book 14
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 18 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 18,248
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 16,877
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 16,844

After being murdered by a mystery assailant, navigating his way through the realm between life and death, and being brought back to the mortal world, Harry realizes that maybe death wasn’t all that bad - because he is no longer Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only professional wizard. He is now Harry Dresden, Winter Knight to Mab, the Queen of Air and Darkness. After Harry had no choice but to swear his fealty, Mab wasn’t about to let something as petty as death steal away the prize she had sought for so long.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thwarts Every Expectation - In a Good Way

  • By A reader on 12-21-12

Harry is the most believable character in Fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-11-12

Where does Cold Days rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Cold Days is one of my new Favorites, and easily trumps Dead Beat as my new favorite.. I feel like Harry Dresden is someone I know, someone I understand. Wrestling with inner demons (and outer demons), you just can't help but feel for the guy. You've heard the Spider Man motto "With great power relies great responsibility", but Spidey has NOTHING on Harry Dresden. And with no disrespect to Mr. Glover, James Marsters IS the voice of Harry.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Cold Days?

Three:'
1) Harry breaking down in front of Karen when she forces him to talk about his daughter
2) Harry confronting shark face during the Psychic duel, and screams"I am Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden"
3) Harry ranting about the magazine article he read about how women communicate on 6 different levels while men have just the one, and it must be some kind of superpower.

What about James Marsters’s performance did you like?

Lacuna. Oh my god, I want to break out laughing right now just thinking about her voice and her asking Harry why he wears clothes.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The whole book moved me. But Harry crying while admitting to Karen that he was afraid to see his daughter is probably on top. Also (trying to keep this as spoiler free as possible) the consequences of the winter lady and the summer lady at the end of the book.

Any additional comments?

Listen to this book twice, you will understand it much more deeply the second time. Everything happened for a reason.

  • Ruins

  • Pathfinder, Book 2
  • By: Orson Scott Card
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki, Kirby Heyborne, Emily Janice Card
  • Length: 14 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,949
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,617
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,642

When Rigg and his friends crossed the Wall between the only world they knew and a world they could not imagine, he hoped he was leading them to safety. But the dangers in this new wallfold are more difficult to see. Rigg, Umbo, and Param know that they cannot trust the expendable, Vadesh - a machine shaped like a human, created to deceive - but they are no longer certain that they can even trust one another. But they will have little choice. Because although Rigg can decipher the paths of the past, he can’t yet see the horror that lies ahead: A destructive force with deadly intentions is hurtling toward Garden.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Too much arguing between the characters.

  • By Arthur on 01-13-15

This book is a tease!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-12

What did you love best about Ruins?

The character development was not sidelined. The story was just as much about Rigg, Umbo, Param, Loaf, and Olivenko as it is about saving the world. And OSC never lets you forget that Rigg is 14. Or.. 16.. Depending on how you look at it.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Vadesh. I can't tell why without being a spoiler, but there's more to 'everybody lies to Vadesh' then meets the eye.

Have you listened to any of the narrators’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

This is right up there with everything Rundnicki does. It took a while for Kirby to grow on me, I did not like his performance in the Alvin Maker series, but he has gotten much better, and does a much better job as the whiny brat in this series as he did in Maker. And ESC's voice is so sweet, it deserves to be in every OSC book. I just wish they could have fit Scott Brick back. Since there was no Point of View from Ram Odin, I guess that's why he's not there.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It did make me laugh out loud several times, especially the relationship between Umbo and Param. When Umbo tried to philosophize about peeing while skipping forward through time, it was so...Umbo...that I just couldn't help it.

Any additional comments?

While there's heavy sci-fi in this series, it is not very serious, and if that is something that you must have then you might not like it too much. But I seriously doubt any Orson Scott Card fan has that expectation. Now Mr. Card, get into gear and finish Ender, and finish Alvin Maker. I'm so mad at you for leaving Alvin Maker hanging for so long.. Two have made me cry and my life, the first was Fahrenheit 451 and the second was Bean's death in Shadow's in flight... You stand in good company.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful