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Mark G

  • 10
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  • 46
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  • 227
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  • Shoe Dog

  • A Memoir by the Creator of Nike
  • By: Phil Knight
  • Narrated by: Norbert Leo Butz, Phil Knight - introduction
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 25,708
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 23,105
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 23,100

In this candid and riveting memoir, for the first time ever, Nike founder and CEO Phil Knight shares the inside story of the company's early days as an intrepid start-up and its evolution into one of the world's most iconic, game-changing, and profitable brands.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must listen to book- It's the perfect biz memoir

  • By Brock on 06-02-16

Disgusted by Nike

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-18

Interesting stories by a guy with very questionable integrity. Since Nike is siding with the enemies of America, like Kaepernick, I simply must return this title. Come to think of it, their recent choice to sign on Kaepernick is consistent with the lack of integrity presented in the book. It's all of a piece. A guy loves the enemies of the USA like China and Kaepernick, and thinks nothing of outsourcing billions of dollars worth of business to China to maximize his profit. It's not like he's going to share the low prices with the American people - as we know, Nike products are super-overpriced. I'd be willing to pay those prices if I knew I was supporting American manufacturers and workers. But Nike pockets those billions and decides to share them with our enemies, like Kaepernick. I will never buy Nike products again.

  • The Smear

  • How Shady Political Operatives and Fake News Control What You See, What You Think, and How You Vote
  • By: Sharyl Attkisson
  • Narrated by: Sharyl Attkisson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 685
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 633
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 630

Behind most major political stories in the modern era, there is an agenda - an effort by opposition researchers, spin doctors, and outside interests to destroy an idea or a person. The tactic they use is the Smear. Every day, Americans are influenced by the Smear without knowing it. Paid forces cleverly shape virtually every image you cross. Maybe you read that Donald Trump is a racist misogynist or saw someone on the news mocking the Bernie Sanders campaign. The trick of the Smear is that it is often based on some shred of truth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A cancer metastasizing...

  • By MJ on 08-05-17

A harbinger of an Orwellian world

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-14-17

I knew that politics and fake news were really bad. I just had no idea how bad they really were. It is scary. This book is very illuminating. Do yourself a favor and read it to better understand today’s world. We are being managed like a herd of cattle. Most politicians and their associates are wicked beyond belief. They will stop at nothing to gain power and money.

  • Winter of the World

  • The Century Trilogy, Book 2
  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 31 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,212
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,791
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,787

Winter of the World picks up right where the first book left off, as its five interrelated families - American, German, Russian, English, Welsh - enter a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the Spanish Civil War and the great dramas of World War II, up to the explosions of the American and Soviet atomic bombs. As always with Ken Follett, the historical background is brilliantly researched and rendered, the action fast-moving, the characters rich in nuance and emotion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant Sequel

  • By Tim on 03-15-13

Pleasant light fiction a la Clive Cussler

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-16

What did you like best about Winter of the World? What did you like least?

It's light and pleasant action adventure packed reading, a bit like Clive Cussler fantasy books. Since Follett either does not know history or purposely distorts it, it is a misleading historical account hiding massive British and French cowardice and incompetence, especially in the years leading up to and in the beginning of the conflict. It's a self-serving "warm-fuzzy" for the English.

Has Winter of the World turned you off from other books in this genre?

No, I like Dirk Pitt, Jack Reacher and similar characters and I do not confuse those books with history.

What does John Lee bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Nuance and interpretation - always very valuable in a well rendered audio book.

Was Winter of the World worth the listening time?

Probably not - there are much better books out there and life is short : )

Any additional comments?

I realized that Follet is a propagandist, and not honest when it comes to historical truth. I'm done with him.

  • Smarter Faster Better

  • The Secrets of Being Productive in Life and Business
  • By: Charles Duhigg
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,616
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,800
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,734

Drawing on the latest findings in neuroscience, psychology, and behavioral economics - as well as the experiences of CEOs, educational reformers, four-star generals, FBI agents, airplane pilots, and Broadway songwriters - this painstakingly researched book explains that the most productive people, companies, and organizations don't merely act differently. They view the world, and their choices, in profoundly different ways.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Long and drawn out

  • By Joel on 08-05-16

Boring almost to the limit of human endurance

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-16

What disappointed you about Smarter Faster Better?

Incredibly long winded.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Probably a Jack Reacher book by Lee Child.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Too uniformly enthusiastic.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Smarter Faster Better?

Most of them. The examples are unnecessarily full of irrelevant details by a factor of at least ten.

Any additional comments?

A most severely abridged version of this book could be useful.

  • Cochrane

  • The Real Master and Commander
  • By: David Cordingly
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 13 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 120
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66

Nicknamed le loup des mers ("the sea wolf") by Napoleon, Thomas Cochrane was one of the most daring and successful naval heroes of all time. In this fascinating account of Cochrane's life, historian David Cordingly unearths startling new details about the real-life "Master and Commander", from his daring exploits against the French navy to his role in the liberation of Chile, Peru, and Brazil, and the shock exchange scandal that forced him out of England and almost ended his naval career.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • There is a better book on Lord Cochrane

  • By Mark G on 07-20-15

There is a better book on Lord Cochrane

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-15

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No. The author seems to grant Lord Cochrane only limited and grudging approbation. The author expresses a "balanced" view of this giant of a man - a bit like a shopkeeper's considered opinion of a great hero. This "damning by faint praise" seems mildly distasteful to me. The subject of the book is utterly fascinating and his accomplishments beyond the reach of but a few score of individuals in human history. I liked "Cochrane: The Life and Exploits of a Fighting Captain" by Robert Harvey much better. It is also available on Audible.

Has Cochrane turned you off from other books in this genre?

Not at all - but I've been turned off from other books by Mr. Cordingly.

What about John Lee’s performance did you like?

Good diction, his accents, a pleasant voice.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

A movie about Lord Cochrane could be great fun - but not one based on this book.

Any additional comments?

This book is essentially a tedious laundry list of Lord Cochrane amazing achievements. The subject is fascinating but the author does not seem to be captivated. I liked "Cochrane: The Life and Exploits of a Fighting Captain" by Robert Harvey much better. It is also available on Audible.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Rubicon

  • The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic
  • By: Tom Holland
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 15 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,112
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,024
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,022

The Roman Republic was the most remarkable state in history. What began as a small community of peasants camped among marshes and hills ended up ruling the known world. Rubicon paints a vivid portrait of the Republic at the climax of its greatness - the same greatness which would herald the catastrophe of its fall. It is a story of incomparable drama.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Connects the Dots and Fills In the Gaps

  • By Emily on 01-28-12

Very disappointing,chaotic story,cliched language

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-17-14

What would have made Rubicon better?

Just as a mosaic would be hard to understand if we started out by describing the individual pieces rather than describing the big picture, this story jumps around to individual events and personas without sketching out a larger context first. I believe that if the story were better organized, the book would be better.

What was most disappointing about Tom Holland’s story?

I found the abundant use of hackneyed phrases and strings of cliches made the book difficult to listen to. I listened to this book right after Gibbon's "Decline and Fall" and the contrast was just too much to take. I had to stop after a few hours.

Would you be willing to try another one of Steven Crossley’s performances?

His clear diction and English accent are pleasant to listen to but his typically English over-emotional and over-emphatic reading became tiresome after a while. I think I'd be willing to give him a try if he read a Victorian novel - his censorious intonations would probably fit well the characters of that era who commonly found a lot to be dissatisfied with. I think he is probably very good with works of high drama.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Disappointment.

Any additional comments?

Sorry to be critical - this could be a good book with some reorganization and revisions, and with a language that rises above the evening news' standards. I have learned some new things from it. But in addition to my remarks above, I have to say I felt the author was talking down to the reader.

2 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus

  • Exploring and Conserving Our Natural World
  • By: Jacques Cousteau, Susan Schielfelbein
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 12 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

Explorer, diving pioneer, filmmaker, inventor, and activist, Jacques Cousteau was blessed from his childhood with boundless curiosity about the natural world. As the leader of fascinating, often dangerous expeditions all over the planet, he discovered firsthand the complexity and beauty of life on earth and undersea - and watched the toll taken by human activity in the 20th century.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • A Politcal Opinion

  • By Thomas M. Olenski on 03-05-13

A wonderful and illuminating book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-15-11

We've all been very lucky that a man with a great spirit, passion and honesty has lived and told us his story and views in such a pleasant and intelligent way. It is very different from the imbecilic coverage of just about anything in the media so it requires a serious and sincere mindset to appreciate. The philosophical insights and indeed underpinnings of Cousteau's work are amply explained in the book - thank God for the lack of sound-bites and political correctness. A fascinating, moving and enjoyable story for a discriminating and sophisticated listener, and a life changing for some, I'm sure. A gem. If only Oprah operated on a higher intellectual plane, it would be so great if she recommended this book to her book club. It's a breath of fresh air and a wake up call. The narration is decent and its faults are minor - I think they do not really detract from the book for a serious minded listener. The tone and the intention of the book, and, of course, the man, are very inspiring to me.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Egyptian

  • Volume 1
  • By: Mika Waltari
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 532
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 198
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 198

The world of ancient Egypt springs magnificently to life in this astonishing historical novel of love, war, political intrigue, and religious revolution. Told from the first person point of view, it is the story of Sinuhe, physician to the royal court of Pharaoh Amenhotep III and his successors in the middle of the tumultuous 14th century B.C.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best historical Novel Ever written

  • By Fernando on 07-11-04

A gripping story and insights of a great writer

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-09

The book is a fascinating story based on historical events. I found the first hour or so a bit difficult to get into but then the book took off and I could hardly stop listening to it. As in great literature, you get powerful insights into human condition but here, as a bonus, you also get a story full of adventures. It is quite plausibly woven into the history of not only Egypt but other great nations that have since disappeared but who at that time where world class powers. It gave me a lot of food for thought about how history repeats itself and how the much the rulers of ancient Egypt or Syria had in common with our current rulers in the US and elsewhere. It is very inspiring to realize how brave our ancestors were and how resourceful and tough - it is a great example to us. I have already put Waltari's "The Roman" on my wish list because "The Egyptian" gave me so much pleasure.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Nietzsche in 90 Minutes

  • By: Paul Strathern
  • Narrated by: Robert Whitfield
  • Length: 1 hr and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 129
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 70
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 67

With Friedrich Nietzsche, philosophy was dangerous not only for philosophers but for everyone. His ideas presaged a collective madness that had horrific consequences in Europe in the early 1900s. Though his philosophy is more one of aphorisms than a system, it is brilliant, persuasive, and incisive. His major concept is the will to power, which he saw as the basic impulse for all our acts. Christianity he saw as a subtle perversion of this concept, thus Nietzsche's famous pronouncement, "God is dead."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A short biography

  • By Peter on 09-21-04

Shallow and misleading

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-04

This book is close to worthless. A great philosopher receives a high handed, patronizing treatment from an intellectual midget, the author, who reviews important concepts that he does not understand through the lens of politically correct cliches of our times. The inappropriately patronizing tone of the narrator, who is quite lost as to where to apply emphasis or ironical tone (so he does that randomly) is irritating. My advice is save your time and money. I should have taken the trouble to listen to an excerpt.

27 of 37 people found this review helpful

  • Romewalks

  • By: Anya Shetterly
  • Narrated by: Maria Tucci
  • Length: 3 hrs and 20 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 25
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 9

Rome's two and a half millennia of history are reflected not only in her fascinating architecture but also in her intricate, winding streets. Now you can put on your earphones and let Romewalks Audio Guide unveil the immense cultural treasures that lie within the walls of this Mediterranean city. Romewalks will charm you with anecdotes from Roman history and gossip about the people, art, religion, archeology, architecture, and cuisine of Rome.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fresh approach

  • By Mark G on 07-16-04

A fresh approach

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-16-04

This book reveals the Rome that most of us are just not aware of as we rush trying to check off all the famous sights covered in most guidebooks. This is a more intimate look at the city. I found it very involving and charming. I have been to Rome twice and loved it but this book makes me want to epxerience it afresh and take my time doing it.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful