LISTENER

Benjamin Cook

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
  • The Winter of the Witch

  • A Novel
  • By: Katherine Arden
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Gati
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 905
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 855
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 854

The Winternight Trilogy introduced an unforgettable heroine, Vasilisa Petrovna, a girl determined to forge her own path in a world that would rather lock her away. Her gifts and her courage have drawn the attention of Morozko, the winter-king, but it is too soon to know if this connection will prove a blessing or a curse. Now, Moscow has been struck by disaster. Its people are searching for answers - and for someone to blame.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A rare perspective on myth

  • By Benjamin Cook on 03-19-19

A rare perspective on myth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-19

This is one of the most interesting takes on a mythology I've ever had the pleasure to encounter in a work of fiction. It's rare to see the relationship between organized religion and folk belief play out in a work like this, and even rarer to see the conflict handled with such grace and consideration.

No ideological villainy here. Just good storytelling.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Bear and the Nightingale

  • A Novel
  • By: Katherine Arden
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Gati
  • Length: 11 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,566
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,282
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,273

At the edge of the Russian wilderness, winter lasts most of the year, and the snowdrifts grow taller than houses. But Vasilisa doesn't mind - she spends the winter nights huddled around the embers of a fire with her beloved siblings, listening to her nurse's fairy tales. Above all, she loves the chilling story of Frost, the blue-eyed winter demon who appears in the frigid night to claim unwary souls. Wise Russians fear him, her nurse says, and honor the spirits of house and yard and forest that protect their homes from evil.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I was swept away

  • By Crystal Midkiff on 02-04-17

Excellent introduction to a rich folklore

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-18

Slavic mythology has not been popularized the way Greek and Norse have. Though there are few elements of Slavic religion in this tale, the author and the narrator have done an excellent job painting the dynamic between Christianity and Slavic tradition, as well as introducing many elements of the latter.

  • The Time Machine

  • By: H.G. Wells
  • Narrated by: John Banks
  • Length: 3 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 376
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 345
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 344

When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year 802,701 AD, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realises that this beautiful people are simply remnants of a once-great culture - now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. But they have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity - the sinister Morlocks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • John Banks

  • By Anonymous User on 04-12-19

Excellent story, excellent acting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-17

Wonderfully written, much better than the film. The voice actor did an excellent job with his reading.

  • Brave New World

  • By: Aldous Huxley
  • Narrated by: Michael York
  • Length: 8 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15,675
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13,747
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,798

When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

Cloning, feel-good drugs, anti-aging programs, and total social control through politics, programming, and media: has Aldous Huxley accurately predicted our future? With a storyteller's genius, he weaves these ethical controversies in a compelling narrative that dawns in the year 632 A.F. (After Ford, the deity). When Lenina and Bernard visit a savage reservation, we experience how Utopia can destroy humanity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • “Oh, Ford, Ford Ford, I Wish I Had My Soma!”

  • By Jefferson on 10-03-11

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-17

Narrator voices all characters distinctly well. The story was absolutely amazing. I was very impressed.