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  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 16
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  • Differently Morphous

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 10 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,350
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,091

A magical serial killer is on the loose, and gelatinous, otherworldly creatures are infesting the English countryside. Which is making life for the Ministry of Occultism difficult, because magic is supposed to be their best kept secret. After centuries in the shadows, the Ministry is forced to unmask, exposing the country's magical history - and magical citizens - to a brave new world of social media, government scrutiny, and public relations.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Meddling Muggles Muddle it Up

  • By Dubi on 11-07-18

A real improvement for Yahtzee

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-19

Funny, engaging, and builds a compelling world - focusing entirely only on wackadoo outliers makes both the socially conscious and the socially contrarian seem like idiot monsters though. Unfortunately, I'd say the author's association with the truly awful culture of aggrieved white gamer dudes still peeks through. The female protagonist shows progress though.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Jam

  • By: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Narrated by: Yahtzee Croshaw
  • Length: 14 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,124
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,998
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,996

We were prepared for an earthquake. We had a flood plan in place. We could even have dealt with zombies. Probably. But no one expected the end to be quite so…sticky…or strawberry scented. Yahtzee Croshaw ( Mogworld, Zero Punctuation Reviews) returns to audiobooks with a follow-up to his smash-hit debut: Jam, a dark comedy about the one apocalypse no one predicted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved It

  • By Zak on 11-25-13

Trite

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

Action hindered by Yahtzee's awkward reading. Uninterested in what makes sci-fi compelling. Misogynistic. Funny though.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fool's War

  • By: Sarah Zettel
  • Narrated by: Parisa Johnston
  • Length: 19 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

In this New York Times Notable Book of the Year, a strange new life form threatens all of humanity, and only a fool would stand in its way. Katmer Al Shei has done well with the starship Pasadena, cutting corners where necessary to keep her crew paid and her journeys profitable. But there are two things she will never skimp on: her crew - and her fool. For a long space journey, a certified Fool’s Guild clown is essential, to amuse, excite, and otherwise distract the crew from the drudgeries of interstellar flight.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing characters. Amazing story. I loved it.

  • By E. Brown on 12-08-18

A better future

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-17

The title doesn't refer to the world of the novel, but to the future of sci-fi as a genre. Ms. Zettel presents a more inclusive world, exposing not just compelling hypotheticals but also a diversity of people, viewpoints, and cultures.

This book WILL get you outside your cultural bubble, if you give it a chance.

History rhymes though, we should remember the first modern work of science fiction can be credited to Shelley's Frankenstein. The new Prometheus was also a story that chafed at the edges of cultural norms. It wasn't just great because it explored the cultural ramifications of conquering death, and Fool's War didn't just postulate about the potential form and politics of machine sentience. Both books have real insight into what it is to live a meaningful and good life.

  • The Glass Bead Game

  • By: Hermann Hesse
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 21 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 473
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 353
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 363

Set in the 23rd century, The Glass Bead Game is the story of Joseph Knecht, who has been raised in Castalia, which has provided for the intellectual elite to grow and flourish. Since childhood, Knecht has been consumed with mastering the Glass Bead Game, which requires a synthesis of aesthetics and scientific arts, such as mathematics, music, logic, and philosophy, which he achieves in adulthood, becoming a Magister Ludi (Master of the Game).

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of Mankind's Best Books

  • By D. Raynal on 10-30-12

Severely Outdated and Self Absorbed

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-16

Would you try another book from Hermann Hesse and/or David Colacci?

I read Siddhartha and liked it. After this, I am leery of investigating Hesse's other work. Colacci did an acceptable job.

What could Hermann Hesse have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I have read Hesse's Siddhartha. It was engaging and interesting, especially as a consideration of an adult Westerner's interpretation of Eastern Gnosticism. The Glass Bead Game is widely praised though not particularly widely known today. I expected a thoughtful philosophical text that mused on the role of education and intellectualism in repelling the rise of fascism.

Instead, I read a long-winded diatribe utterly convinced of its own cleverness. And it was, frankly, boring. I would like to say that this view is the result purely of my contemporary diet of literature where sliding narrative, constructed framing devices, and aside discussions of ideological issues are relatively commonplace. These things are all practiced in Star Trek for Gods' sake. But I cannot. Hesse did not invent, nor did he perfect these techniques.

Hesse's fascination with Eastern mysticism becomes outright fetishism in this text, with a seeming endorsement of the I-Ching as a problem solving tool. The general idea of greater emphasis on enshrining rational thought in society is defeated by the pointless and Pyrrhic death of the main character, halfway through the book. The codas are pointless and preachy, effectively repeating the main story three times! He should have stopped navel-gazing at some point and taken some sort of stand or argued some hypothesis.

If the book is neither purpose-driven, nor entertaining, the only reason to read it is historical curiosity.

What aspect of David Colacci’s performance would you have changed?

None

What character would you cut from The Glass Bead Game?

The 3 extra lives of Knecht

Any additional comments?

More than I care to take the time to discuss here.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful