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Don McGowan

  • 13
  • reviews
  • 72
  • helpful votes
  • 80
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  • The Teenage Brain

  • A Neuroscientist's Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults
  • By: Frances E. Jensen, Amy Ellis Nutt
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert, Frances E. Jensen
  • Length: 9 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 410
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 357
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 352

Drawing on her research, knowledge, and clinical experience, internationally respected neurologist--and mother of two boys--Frances E. Jensen, MD, offers a revolutionary look at the adolescent brain, providing remarkable insights that translate into practical advice both for parents and teenagers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Every page, another connection, more compassion

  • By papa k on 02-02-17

Good overview, tough reader

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-15

Would you listen to The Teenage Brain again? Why?

I wouldn't listen to it again because I found the reader difficult to handle. She has a particularly breathless way of speaking that I feel would be better for fiction works than non-fiction.

What other book might you compare The Teenage Brain to and why?

Many neurology books. This is a good overview of concepts and then applies them well.

Would you be willing to try another one of Tavia Gilbert and Frances E. Jensen ’s performances?

Tavia Gilbert: not likely.
Frances E. Jensen: probably.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

I don't know why they made a film of this book.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

On Negotiating audiobook cover art
  • On Negotiating

  • By: Mark H. McCormack
  • Narrated by: Mark H. McCormack
  • Length: 4 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

Even experienced negotiators can find situations beyond their grasp. Mark H. McCormack, widely...

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Keep looking!

  • By Michael Bednarski on 03-09-05

The best book on negotiation I've ever encountered

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-12

Would you listen to On Negotiating again? Why?

I listen to this book about 3x per year. It is a textbook and a bible for anyone who has to negotiate deals for a living. It is pure tactics, with excellent and appropriate war stories from the trenches. Although it's from 1995, it's not dated.

What other book might you compare On Negotiating to and why?

If you listen to this and compare it to things like Getting to Yes, you'll realize this book is superior because it's by someone who has actually lived these principles. McCormack founded ICM and these are the tips he used to make it into a powerhouse.

Which scene was your favorite?

For a non-fiction book it's not scenes, it's anecdotes and sections. Each chapter has tons of them.

  • Five Minds for the Future

  • By: Howard Gardner
  • Narrated by: Mark Adam
  • Length: 6 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 59

We live in a time of vast changes that include accelerating globalization, mounting quantities of information, the growing hegemony of science and technology, and the clash of civilizations. Those changes call for new ways of learning and thinking in school, business, and the professions. Listen as psychologist Howard Gardner defines the cognitive abilities that will command a premium in the years ahead.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Helpful book, very poor reader

  • By David on 07-30-09

Complete disappointment, misleading description

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-09

I am a great fan of Howard Gardner's other work, most specifically his work on multiple intelligences. This book is not related to those books. Gardner is a psychologist and does best when describing, then drawing conclusions from empirical data. This book is normative - Gardner states that he is acting as an advisor to policymakers and not as a psychologist or researcher. The editorial review on this site doesn't call that out, and so if you're looking for a continuation of the themes Gardner has developed in his other work you will be disappointed here. Instead he talks about the five types of personality that he thinks will be important for future societies. Nothing new or inventive about this.

I perhaps shouldn't review the book because I didn't finish it. After about an hour I realized there were better things I could do with my time. But the fact that it caused me not to want to finish, that seems to be worth sharing. The portions that I did hear were exhortations on how to develop educational policy to promote certain ideas. I am not a policymaker so perhaps I'm not the right audience. But I didn't find anything he said to be particularly insightful in this regard either.

The narration style adds to the problems. It is annoyingly nasal. I was quite surprised to see that the narrator is not the author - author-narration would at least forgive choosing someone whose voice detracts from the material. But the fact that they paid someone money for this? Astonishing.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Buying In

  • The Secret Dialogue Between What We Buy and Who We Are
  • By: Rob Walker
  • Narrated by: Robert Fass
  • Length: 9 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 51

Marketing executives and consumer advocates alike predict a future of brand-proof consumers, armed with technology and a sophisticated understanding of marketing techniques, who can effectively tune out ad campaigns. But as Rob Walker demonstrates, this widely accepted misconception has eclipsed the real changes in the way modern consumers relate to their brands of choice. Combine this with marketers' new ability to blur the line between advertising, entertainment, and public space, and you have dramatically altered the relationship between consumer and consumed.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Its ok, good info, but I had to force my way

  • By Thomas on 07-19-10

Good study of changes in marketing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-09

This book focuses on what the author calls "murketing", which is where marketing blends into real life. Examples include the way people are invited to become "product advocates" (my term not his) to promote products for corporations, and how brands have become a part of self-identification. Walker is a journalist and it shows from his writing which is clear and not overwrought or stilted.

I found the book to be interesting, although the author was a bit too enamored of the new. Everyone who writes one of these books talks about how the world is changing and has never been this way before. Walker isn't quite that gullible and he even points to the past sometimes, but I found still that he seems to believe that his insights are unique a bit too often. They're not, but that doesn't make the book less worthwhile and it doesn't mean you shouldn't consider it.

Often Audible narrators are annoying and can't pronounce non-English words properly, emphasize the wrong syllables, etc. You won't have that problem here.

8 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Reason

  • Why Liberals Will Win the Battle for America
  • By: Robert B. Reich
  • Narrated by: Robert B. Reich
  • Length: 7 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50

From Robert B. Reich, passionate believer in American democracy and public servant, Reason is a guide to confronting and derailing what he sees as the mounting threat to American liberty, prosperity, and security posed by the radical conservatives, Radcons as he calls them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Reason

  • By Ron Green on 03-13-05

But you were there...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-06

I'd like to have liked this more, but there's two reasons I couldn't.

He starts strong, giving a litany of what he thinks is wrong with American politics and business life. But the more you listen to his positions on big business activities like Enron and WorldCom, you may find yourself thinking "but it's not like you were an outsider during all of this". Reich was in the Clinton White House. He was Secretary of Labor. He was there. Sure, Clinton didn't control the Congress, but people listen when a Cabinet Secretary talks. He didn't speak then, so he waives a bit of his moral right to speak now.

2. This book isn't actually about Why Liberals Will Win. It's about what Robert Reich thinks is wrong with conservatism. That's fine, but you may find yourself waiting for the conclusion that never comes.

12 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Me Talk Pretty One Day

  • By: David Sedaris
  • Narrated by: David Sedaris
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,265
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,527
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,509

David Sedaris' collection of essays - including live recordings! - tells a most unconventional life story. With every clever turn of a phrase, Sedaris brings a view and a voice like no other to every unforgettable encounter. You can also listen to Sedaris in an interview with Terry Gross on Fresh Air.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Subtly Funny Musings on Life Experiences

  • By FanB14 on 09-03-12

Overrated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-06

Same comments on this book as I had for "Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim" - bought both of them before I'd listened to either one, which was a big mistake. If you're not interested in listening to "quirky family stories" then Sedaris isn't your guy. David Rakoff is a better choice.

6 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Guerrilla P.R. Wired

  • Successful Publicity Campaigns On-Line, Off-line, and in Between
  • By: Michael Levine
  • Narrated by: Lloyd James
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 40
  • Performance
    2.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars 6

Guerilla P.R. Wired transports Michael Levine's legendary street-fighting P.R. tactics to the wide-open domain of the World Wide Web. Motivating, brilliant, and filled with invaluable strategies for getting maximum attention regardless of your budget, Guerrilla P.R. Wired will show you how to get noticed now and help you craft a message that is both powerful and profitable in today's fast moving, wired world.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Don't bother

  • By Don McGowan on 01-03-06

Don't bother

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-06

If you've got any background whatsoever in Internet-related issues, this book is a complete waste of time. If you don't, you'll probably need the paper copy of the book, or you'll want to listen to this with a notepad so you can write down the details of what he's saying. Either way, this download isn't worth your time or money.

9 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim

  • By: David Sedaris
  • Narrated by: David Sedaris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,909
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,660
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,672

In his newest collection of essays, David Sedaris lifts the corner of ordinary life, revealing the absurdity teeming below its surface. His world is alive with obscure desires and hidden motives, a world where forgiveness is automatic and an argument can be the highest form of love. Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim is another unforgettable collection from one of the wittiest and most original writers at work today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sedaris is the gay Mark Twain.

  • By Steve on 06-02-04

He thinks he's funnier than he is

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-06

I used to wonder what all the hype was about. Now I know. Not much. David Sedaris has had a not atypical suburban kid life - he grew up alienated from his parents and family, he went to college and didn't do as well as he might have hoped, he started using and then recreationally selling drugs, he cleaned up his act, and he moved on to bigger things. He's got family members with quirks, and he's gay. And he tells you about them.

Before you get this book or any of his others, go download David Rakoff's Fraud. I think Rakoff is superior to Sedaris here - Rakoff is a journalist so his subject matter is intrinsically interesting. Sedaris, if you don't want to hear about his family, or you think he just sounds whiny, you're out of luck. I wasn't bored out of my mind so 3 stars seems appropriate, but that's still 5 hours of my life I'm never getting back.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • 100 Ways to Motivate Others

  • How Great Leaders Can Produce Insane Results
  • By: Steve Chandler, Scott Richardson
  • Narrated by: Steve Chandler
  • Length: 5 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 249
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 72

100 Ways to Motivate Others is the culmination of many years of successful leadership coaching and training by best-selling author Steve Chandler and attorney Scott Richardson, and the natural follow-up to Steve's previous best sellers, including 100 Ways to Motivate Yourself. Chandler and Richardson have crafted a vital, user-friendly, inspirational guide for executives, managers, and professionals...and those aspiring to reach their level.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You can't Manage - you must Lead

  • By Arthur Held on 04-23-05

Good, in parts

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-06

This book is good in parts, and other parts are a bit trite. It relies on a few stories a bit too much - by the end of the book you're going to feel you don't care at all about some guy and his violin teacher but you've been hearing about them for a long time now - but often balances that by stating some obvious things that people sometimes don't say out loud and so they go unnoticed. You wouldn't be wasting your time here, but don't burn your last book credit on it either.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Confidence

  • How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin and End
  • By: Rosabeth Moss Kanter
  • Narrated by: Carrington Macduffie
  • Length: 13 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 12

Why do the Yankees always seem to win and the Red Sox fade? Why do companies such as Dell and Gillette never seem to lose their halo? What lessons does Nelson Mandela offer leaders in trouble spots like the Middle East. From sports to business and the most complicated political situations, a common element, a truth, persists: people succeed when leaders give them the confidence to do so.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Little insight, very shallow

  • By Ellen on 09-27-04

Very solid

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-06

This is a very solid book. Like all business books there's parts where it lags, and you sometimes might think she's overusing certain case studies, but this is a good analysis of a difficult topic, well-written and well-read. I listened to this on the beach in Mexico and never once regretted the choice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful