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  • Replay

  • By: Ken Grimwood
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 11 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,383
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,713
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,733

In 1988, 43-year-old Jeff Winston died of a heart attack. But then he awoke, and it was 1963; Jeff was 18 all over again, his memory of the next two decades intact. This time around, Jeff would gain all the power and wealth he never had before. This time around he'd know how to do it right. Until next time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Favorite Book for the past 10 years

  • By psnorb on 12-29-08

Loved every second of it!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-16

Where does Replay rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Top 3 for sure!

What was one of the most memorable moments of Replay?

The first replay.

Which scene was your favorite?

So many!

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

What would you do if you could do it all again, and again, and again....

Any additional comments?

One of my favorite books ever!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Man Who Folded Himself

  • By: David Gerrold
  • Narrated by: Charles Bice
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 167
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 170

The Man Who Folded Himself, written in 1973 (and reissued by BenBella in 2003) is a classic science fiction novel by award-winning author David Gerrold. This work was nominated for both Hugo and Nebula awards and is considered by some critics to be the finest time travel novel ever written.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my first tastes of trues science fiction

  • By Russell Norton on 12-29-13

Really repetitive - short on story

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-16

Would you try another book from David Gerrold and/or Charles Bice?

Maybe if it had good reviews

Would you recommend The Man Who Folded Himself to your friends? Why or why not?

No I would not. This book was very repetitive, sometimes so much that I wanted to fast forward. Paragraph upon paragraph of the same thought, over and over again. A guy gets a time travel belt - he travels, but he does few interesting things in his life (aside from... relationships... - I'll just leave it at that). Actually, he does do some spectacular things, but the author just speeds right on through those in a gigantic list of the history of the world.

What aspect of Charles Bice’s performance would you have changed?

The pace was too fast. I had to knock it back by 0.5 speed, which was a first for me.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No

Any additional comments?

Maybe this is one of those books that you either really love or dislike.

  • Not a Match

  • My True Tales of Online Dating Disasters
  • By: Brian Donovan
  • Narrated by: Ax Norman
  • Length: 2 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 1,466
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,286
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 1,292

Forty million people in the US have tried Internet dating, which means 40 million people have probably gone on some pretty crappy dates. Not a Match: My True Tales of Online Dating Disasters is about one guy who experienced more than his fair share. Brian Donovan, a writer and comedian whose work has appeared on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, NPR, and Chapelle's Show, has been on over 100 Internet dates in a genuine search for love and happiness.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Dating in New York is a Horrible Crapshoot.

  • By Erin - Audible on 08-13-13

Not for me

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-25-14

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

The author tried too hard to be funny. Sometimes came off very judgmental in an awkward and overbearing way. For example, when he describes the question on OK Cupid about letting someone cut you in bed. Hey, I'm not into that either, but the author just beat this idea to death and really thought he was being funny about it. So much so that it made me acutely aware of his difficult attempts to turn a mildly funny situation into a knee-slapping one. These incidences were obvious, really felt forced, and turned me off for the rest of the book.

Would you ever listen to anything by Brian Donovan again?

Maybe.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful