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Neuron

Sweden
  • 90
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  • 92
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  • Why Did the Chicken Cross the World?

  • The Epic Saga of the Bird That Powers Civilization
  • By: Andrew Lawler
  • Narrated by: Dennis Holland
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 109
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100

From ancient empires to modern economics, veteran journalist Andrew Lawler delivers a sweeping history of the animal that has been most crucial to the spread of civilization across the globe: the chicken. Queen Victoria was obsessed with it. Socrates' last words were about it. Charles Darwin and Louis Pasteur made their scientific breakthroughs using it. Catholic popes, African shamans, Chinese philosophers, and Muslim mystics praised it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Oddly organized, but stirring

  • By Shannon Carty on 06-11-16

Never imagined the volume of bird trivia

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-18

This is a book about chicken. One would think that it is hard to write a book entirely about chicken. And one would think it is impossible to write such a book that is also interesting. Wrong, and wrong again. This book takes you on an unexpected, occasionally thrilling journey.

The reader will learn about:
- The number of chicken in the world: More than twice as many chickens as humans.
- The ancestry of chicken: They are related to dinosaurs and have been a part of our diet since at least 1500bc.
- The use of chicken in medicine: Squeezing it and drinking the resulting fluids cures a fewer (or so people thought.
- The morphology of chickens penises (or lack thereof).
- The role of chicken in ancient Greece: Socrates last words were about penises.
- Cockfighting: Still a very big sport in some countries.
- The intelligence of chicken (they are smarter than you think).
- And how much chicken we eat (crazy amounts).

If you are at all into chicken then this book is certain to be a smash hit. If you eat chicken occasionally and think chickens are ‘fine’, then this book will still be a hit. Even the reader who has never thought about this bird is likely to enjoy this book.

  • The Spy and the Traitor

  • By: Ben MacIntyre
  • Narrated by: Ben Macintyre
  • Length: 14 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 34
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 34

On a warm July evening in 1985, a middle-aged man stood on the pavement of a busy avenue in the heart of Moscow, holding a plastic carrier bag. In his grey suit and tie, he looked like any other Soviet citizen. The bag alone was mildly conspicuous, printed with the red logo of Safeway, the British supermarket. The man was a spy. A senior KGB officer, for more than a decade he had supplied his British spymasters with a stream of priceless secrets from deep within the Soviet intelligence machine. No spy had done more to damage the KGB. The Safeway bag was a signal: to activate his escape plan to be smuggled out of Soviet Russia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant Audio Book

  • By Anonymous User on 12-07-18

Leave a beer capsule under the bench in the park

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-18

This book is as good as it gets when it comes to spy stories. It starts out strong – diving straight into the story – and then it just keeps going. I can be a drifter, but it was impossible to drift away while reading this book. It keeps the reader engaged at all times.

The protagonist is Oleg Gordievsky. A real person! Indeed, an actual former KGB spy who defected and joined MI6, becoming one of the most important spies in the cold war. If you like the show “The Americans” then you are almost guaranteed to enjoy this book as well. I particularly appreciated the descriptions of how spies communicate with one another. It can go something like this: If spy X leaves an orange peel under the right side of a bench in the southwest corner of some park, then that means that someone is onto him. But if instead, he leaves a blue chalk mark on a light pole on street Y in SOHO, that means that he wants to meet.

The descriptions of spy communication are both fascinating and humorous. Indeed, as one would expect it can sometimes become confusing such as when one spy was supposed to drop a beer capsule instead dropped a ginger beer capsule. After a lengthy discussion it was decided that the spy probably did not distinguish between ginger beer and real beer.

Nevertheless, there is a lot more to this book. You get insight into the political atmosphere in the 1980s, You will encounter politicians as well as spies. Yet, first and foremost, you get a top-notch cat and mouse spy chase. And the best thing is that the story is, as far as I can tell, entirely factual. The author makes it clear when he is speculating, which I appreciate. If you are at all into these types of books, then you can’t go wrong with this book

  • Hormonal

  • The Hidden Intelligence of Hormones -- How They Drive Desire, Shape Relationships, Influence Our Choices, and Make Us Wiser
  • By: Martie Haselton
  • Narrated by: Tanya Eby
  • Length: 7 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10

Did you know women walk more, eat less, socialize more, meet more men, dance more, and flirt more when they're ovulating? Or that PMS may have evolved to get rid of boyfriends with unfit sperm? Behind the "fickle" differences in what women find sexy about men, or what they like to wear, there's a hidden adaptive intelligence shaped over eons. Rather than making women irrational - as the conventional and irredeemably sexist wisdom goes - the female hormonal cycle has been exquisitely fine-tuned to give women the advantages they needed to succeed in our ancestral environments, and perhaps also today.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Being hormonal is adaptive

  • By Neuron on 10-17-18
  • Hormonal
  • The Hidden Intelligence of Hormones -- How They Drive Desire, Shape Relationships, Influence Our Choices, and Make Us Wiser
  • By: Martie Haselton
  • Narrated by: Tanya Eby

Being hormonal is adaptive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-17-18

Humans, like other animals, are biological creatures and our behavior in any given situation is determined by our biology in combination with the situational factors. This is a fundamental fact, yet even today many seem to think that biology doesn't matter – that we are products exclusively of nurture. Some even get offended by the suggestion that hormones affect not only muscle mass and reproductive cycles but also our behavior. This book is an antidote to such nonsense!

Martie Haselton, a professor at UCLA working in the field she has dubbed evolutionary feminism, argues that hormones tune our behavior in adaptive ways. These “hormonal nudges” can cause a woman to find certain traits in a partner more or less attractive, or they can cause changes in mood. As professor Haselton carefully points out, this does not mean – as some news outlets seem to think – that people think with their genitals.

Men do feature in this book, and men do have hormonal cycles. For example, men have a higher concentration of testosterone in the morning. (This explains why certain why men can sometimes be more ‘edgy’ in the morning.). Nevertheless, focus in this book is on women and how the rather brutal hormonal cycles (or lack thereof) nudges behavior. Another under-researched area that features prominently in this book is menopause which is almost like a second puberty in terms of the biological quakes it involves.

This book is well written, funny, and informative. Professor Haselton is excellent at explaining what her research means for you and me while maintaining scientific rigor. The one thing I missed was an apparent response to the arguments put forth by Cordelia Fine in her book “Delusions of Gender” who convincingly argues that hormones play a minor role (although she never says that the effects are non-existent).

If you are the least bit interested in how hormones affect behavior, or if you are just interested in women then this book is an excellent choice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Human Errors

  • A Panorama of Our Glitches, from Pointless Bones to Broken Genes
  • By: Nathan H. Lents
  • Narrated by: L.J. Ganser
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 104

We humans like to think of ourselves as highly evolved creatures. But if we are supposedly evolution's greatest creation, why do we have such bad knees? Why do we catch head colds so often - 200 times more often than a dog does? How come our wrists have so many useless bones? And are we really supposed to swallow and breathe through the same narrow tube? Surely there's been some kind of mistake. As professor of biology Nathan H. Lents explains in Human Errors, our evolutionary history is nothing if not a litany of mistakes, each more entertaining and enlightening than the last.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Most interesting, well narrated

  • By N.Dryl on 05-04-18

Humans are a compromise

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-14-18

Man was created by God. We are his perfect creation. Our perfection is evident in every detail of our design. Right?

If you believe this, then you first need to Google Charles Darwin and evolution. Second, you need to take another look at the human body. Because we are full of defects. This book will give you a few examples of some of our most glaring flaws; flaws that can be found from head to toe, and in our body's architecture as well as in our DNA.

What could possibly be wrong with having a shared channel for air and food? (This is a rhetorical question, but in case you really wonder, food gets stuck, and we die...). It has to be like that, you might argue. But that would be ignoring whales and dolphins. They eat with their mouth and breathe through a different hole on their back; they don’t risk choking. We also have genes for creating several vitamins, e.g., vitamin C – only they are broken. Usually, this doesn't matter because we get vitamin C in our diets and therefore natural selection has had not selected against this detect. But it is a defect nonetheless if we do not get any vitamin C for a while, as sailors crossing the Atlantic, we get sick and die – all because of our non-functional gene.

The reason for our imperfections is that evolution cannot start over, it works by making small gradual changes. Evolution can only undo things partially, which is why we still have a tailbone which is by the way also useless – except for getting hurt...

This book is a call for rationality. It provides a tiny grain of sand to balance the mountains of books glorifying the human body and its 'perfection.' To be sure the human body is impressive in many ways but perfect it is not.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Man's Search for Meaning

  • By: Viktor E. Frankl
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,049
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,414
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,424

Internationally renowned psychiatrist, Viktor E. Frankl, endured years of unspeakable horror in Nazi death camps. During, and partly because of his suffering, Dr. Frankl developed a revolutionary approach to psychotherapy known as logotherapy. At the core of his theory is the belief that man's primary motivational force is his search for meaning.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read This if You're Very Sick and/or Thinking About Ending Your Life

  • By Derek on 07-21-15

Gripping tale; half-baked theory

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-18

This book has two distinct parts. The first part describes Viktor Frankl's experience as a prisoner in a concentration camp in Nazi Germany. The second part is an introduction to logotherapy - a form of therapy developed by b Frankl whose core assumption is that above all we need meaning. For me, the first part was much more powerful and inspiring. 

More than anything else, this book will give the reader perspective. I can sometimes feel pity for myself because of some situation either in my professional or my private life, and when I do, I tend to forget all my blessings. This book is the perfect antidote to self-pity. It is impossible to read this first-hand account from someone who lost everything, his family and all belongings, and spent several years in a concentration camp, and still feel that you're own troubles are insurmountable.

On the contrary, one thinks (or I did), that, if he can find meaning and purpose in his situation, then I have no excuse. Mostly, it is akin to being told to “Stop Whining!”, only much more powerful.

In the second part of the book, Frankl develops his logotherapy. As far as I can tell it is a form of therapy and theory about human motivation, centered around the presupposition that humans above all else seek meaning in life. Accordingly, mental illness is a consequence of the lack of meaning and therapy should focus on finding that meaning. This all makes intuitive sense, but it has a sort of Freudian ring (which coming from me is not a compliment). The theory seems to be grounded entirely in Frankl’s own reflections and anecdotes. This is a recipe for pseudoscience. Now I should say that I don’t know if other people have empirically tested logotherapy – I don’t know. But this book provides essentially no empirical evidence in support of the theory and therefore I have my reservations about it.

Nevertheless, on the whole, this book was worth the read. I think it is hard to find a better description of life in a concentration camp and that part of the book moved me. I think it will also move you if you give it a chance…

  • Factfulness

  • Ten Reasons We're Wrong About The World - And Why Things Are Better Than You Think
  • By: Hans Rosling, Ola Rosling, Anna Rosling Rönnlund
  • Narrated by: Simon Slater
  • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 814
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 716
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 711

Factfulness: The stress-reducing habit of carrying only opinions for which you have strong supporting facts. When asked simple questions about global trends - why the world's population is increasing; how many young women go to school; how many of us live in poverty - we systematically get the answers wrong. So wrong that a chimpanzee choosing answers at random will consistently outguess journalists, Nobel laureates, and investment bankers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awakening book

  • By Hassan on 04-13-18

An antidote to panic-driven worldviews

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-18

I put this book in the same category as Pinker’s recent Enlightenment Now and the earlier Rational Optimist by Matt Ridley. The book provides a lot of facts about the world and how the world has changed over the last five decades, and the facts are indeed encouraging. Hans Rosling is careful to point out that he does not like being called an optimist because it insinuates some degree of naivety. Hans Rosling prefers to be called a realist, and I think – he sees the world as it is, including both problems and solutions. The fact that the world is getting better does not mean that it is perfect or that we can lean back and watch the show. However, it does mean that we are probably doing some things right and it is essential to identify those things so that we can keep doing them.

Unfortunately, the media are terrible at identifying things that work in the world, and they are especially poor at identifying gradual improvements in the world. Rather the media feeds on a disaster, crime, panic, and drama and since a world with 7 billion people will always have enough drama for 30 minutes of news, then that is what the media focus on, and that is what people see. Giving the media all the blame is probably not fair. The media, after all, live in symbiosis with media consumers – they tend to show what people watch and people like to attend a drama. There has been peace in Sweden for 200 years, and guess what, no war broke out today either! Amazing! No, that is not news. So how can we get out of this eternal loop of increasingly gloomy worldviews in a world where progress has never been more evident. Well, reading this book is probably a step in the right direction.

The books begin with some questions about the world. In low-income countries, how many girls finish primary school? Does the majority of the world population live in poor or middle-income countries? What is the life expectancy in the world today? What percentage of the world population are vaccinated today? People, because of their gloomy worldview, tend to get these questions completely wrong. Hans Rosling likes to compare the accuracy of different groups (including politicians and people working at the world bank who really ought to know the answer), to that of chimps. The chimps almost always outperform us because they don’t know anything about the world and therefore guess. But guessing turn out to be better than systematic pessimism, which seems to be the default among humans.

In the remaining part of the book, Rosling revisits each of these questions and based on data from undisputed sources he explains why, in all except one case, the correct and is also the most favorable answer. Poverty is going down drastically. Most people in the world live in middle-income countries. The percentage of girls finishing primary school is almost the same as for boys etc. Intermingled with these more data-driven passages, Rosling includes personal anecdotes from his long career as a public health worker. These anecdotes are fascinating and add to the appeal of the book as well as to my admiration for Rosling.

There are a few surprises in the book. One is Rosling’s claim (based on hard data), that progress does not depend on democracy. Countries such as South Korea, the home of LG, Samsung, Kia, etc., had enormous growth while it was still a military dictatorship. Only later has it become a well-functioning democracy. Rosling is also ambiguous when it comes to activists. He says that activists do drive changes, often in the right direction. However, he also argues that they are prone to exaggerations. Women’s activists, for example, tend to spread the news about how women suffer, but not about the progress such as the fact that girls today are almost as well educated as boys, globally speaking.

For a book that is relatively short, Rosling has managed to include a great deal of data that I think every person in the world should know. Again, not so that we can pad our shoulder and call it a day, but rather so that we can identify what works and continue to do what works. The book is also an enjoyable read with a good flow and a nice mix of anecdotes and data to back up those anecdotes. I think that Bill Gates did a wise thing when he made this book available to all college graduates in the US, and I hope that all college graduates grasp their opportunity to read this excellent book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Koran

  • A Very Short Introduction
  • By: Michael Cook
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35

In this Very Short Introduction, Michael Cook gives vivid accounts of the Koran's role in Muslim civilization, illustrates the diversity of interpretations championed by traditional and modern commentators, discusses the processes by which the book took shape, and compares it to other scriptures and classics of the historic cultures of Eurasia.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Surely a noble Koran in a hidden Book

  • By Darwin8u on 10-24-16

Academic linguists might find something of value…

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-18

By now I have read quite a few non-fiction books about all kinds of different topics. Some authors (e.g., Sam Kean) write in an engaging style that captures the reader and takes them on a journey in which they are entertained and enlightened simultaneously. Other authors are not so good at the capturing part but still manages to provide enough insights to make the book worth your while. However, in some cases, the author offers neither – writing a tedious book that offers little insight, so that even if you do manage to stay awake and pay attention, the reward is small.

This book, unfortunately, belongs to this latter category. Since it is "A very short introduction" I was thinking that the book would describe what the Koran is about and perhaps also go into some of the controversies surrounding the text. Instead, the book almost exclusively discussed linguistics. Time and time again the author will, at length, consider how the meaning of a single word can get lost in translation from say Arabic to Egyptian and English, etc. Sure, this is probably fascinating if you are a linguist, but not if you are someone who wants to know more about the Koran. When reading this book, I did often drift away in my thoughts – which usually only happens when books are boring (yes, I blame the author). So, there is a possibility that somewhere in the book one might also find non-linguistic discussions.

If I could rename this book, I would call it “A short in-depth analysis of different possible meanings of words in the Koran”. This would have the double advantage of being a more accurate title and scaring potential reader away from reading it. If linguistics is your passion in life, then, by all means, read the book. If you want to learn about the Koran, find a different book!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Tribes

  • We Need You to Lead Us
  • By: Seth Godin
  • Narrated by: Seth Godin
  • Length: 3 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,851
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,871
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,835

Tribes are groups of people aligned around an idea, connected to a leader and to each other. Tribes make our world work, and always have. The new opportunity is that it's easier than ever to find, organize, and lead a tribe. The Web has enabled an explosion of all kinds of tribes - and created shortage of people to lead them. This is the growth industry of our time. Tribes will help you understand exactly what's at stake, and why YOU can and should lead a tribe of your own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic

  • By Gale S. on 11-02-09

Seemingly good ideas based on anecdata

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

I recently took part in a leadership course designed for young scientists. The course was inspiring but I was frankly amazed that even though the course was for scientists, the scientific basis of the material was dubious to say the least.

The same is true for this book. On the surface the advice in this book makes sense. Be a heretic, have faith, pursue your idea. This is what leaders do! It is of course easy to think of many people who followed this recipe and became famous world leaders or multi-billionaire entrepreneurs, and the author use such examples to backup the advice given.

However, although anecdotes and inspiring examples are nice, scientifically speaking they don't hold much water. Is it always good to have faith, and to follow your own path? Aren't there also people who follow these principles who are seen as stubborn idiots? These people, unlike the ones who ‘make it’, receive no media attention.

The bottom line is that one can find examples of almost anything - which makes them close to meaningless. Until then, the jury is still out. And hence when it comes to the advice in this book I would also say that the jury is still out.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Meditations of Marcus Aurelius

  • By: Marcus Aurelius
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 5 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,157
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,016
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,000

Meditations is former U.S. President Bill Clinton's favorite book. This audio consists of a series of personal writings by Marcus Aurelius, Roman Emperor 161-180 AD, setting forth his ideas on Stoic philosophy.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The reading made it impossible to focus on content

  • By Mark Grebner on 09-02-12

A very old book...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-11-18

I wish I could be more like Marcus Aurelius. Stoicism is my favorite life philosophy and Marcus is one of the most impressive stoics every - in theory and in practice. The philosophy of stoicism is basically a mindset, a mindset of endurance and inner peace. You will meet idiots, but it is not their fault that they are idiots. You, who know better, know that is is better to remain calm in every situation. Idiots cannot hurt you unless you let them. Instead, be nice, be gentle, be reasonable, at all times and in every encounter.

These are the principles spelled out in this book. Marcus, despite being a very powerful man comes across as humble and reasonable and he is, I think rightly, considered one of the greatest leaders of all time. It, therefore, pains me to say that the book was not very readable. Indeed, I would say that if you finish this book you are already a proven stoic. The reader should keep in mind that Aurelius lived almost 2000 years ago. Language evolves a lot in 2000 years and his contemporaries probably didn't experience the same issues when reading his book. Nevertheless, his promiscuous use of conjunctions (and, or, nor), leads to insanely long sentences - so long that you forget what the sentence was about by the time you reach the end of the sentence.

So even though I am a fan of stoicism and of Marcus Aurelius, I can't recommend this book unless you are one of those persons with a concentration ability made of concrete. In short, the book has a nice message but it is very boring.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Mindhunter

  • Inside the FBI's Elite Serial Crime Unit
  • By: John E. Douglas, Mark Olshaker
  • Narrated by: Richard M. Davidson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,520
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,196
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,184

Discover the classic behind-the-scenes chronicle of John E. Douglas’ 25-year career in the FBI Investigative Support Unit, where he used psychological profiling to delve into the minds of the country’s most notorious serial killers and criminals - the basis for the upcoming Netflix original series.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Too much ego

  • By Kourtney on 01-27-18

Absorbing, compelling, and un-scientific.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-18

Every year, well known psychics make a number of predictions about what is going to happen the next year. There will be an earthquake somewhere in Asia! The housing market will implode! a celebrity couple will divorce! An atomic bomb will go off! And so on. Sometimes their predictions come true, and sometimes they fail. The problem is that the public, especially the ones who wants to believe that psychics have special powers, only count the hits and forget the misses. And if you make predictions such as “there is going to be an earthquake somewhere”, then you will certainly be correct because earthquakes occur every day.

Why am I talking about psychics? Because I fear that profilers, including the infamous author of this book, John Douglas, are a bit like psychics. They get credit for trivial predictions such as ‘The perpetrator is a man between 20-40 years old with a troubled past” - which is true of pretty much every murderer. They are not, to the same extent, held accountable for inaccurate predictions, or they just call them off as anomalies. As with psychics, people forget the errors. To be fair, sometimes profilers also get other more difficult predictions right. The real question is whether this is because they were really good profilers or were they just lucky?

If you read this book you will almost certainly feel that profiling is valid. John Douglas, the authors talks about many cases he has been involved in and you do get the feeling that he is a modern Sherlock Holmes. Yet, it sounds almost too good to be true, and there is almost no mention of any profiling gone wrong, which makes me suspicious. If you go to the wikipedia page about criminal profiling you will find that the profiles created by professional profilers are not any better than those made by ‘amateur’ college graduates. It is also suspicious that Douglas says that you cannot systematize the profiling procedure using computers. In my experience, when you cannot formalize what you do, it usually means you don’t really know what you are doing. It is also highly discrediting that Douglas himself seem to have some belief in psychics… For example, in one case a psychic “heard dripping water” when thinking about a crime and Douglas writes that this is obviously because the crime took place near a river.

Ok, enough ranting. My skepticism apart. What you will get from this book is an inside account of some high-profile murders in the US as well as the history of profiling within the FBI (although it is a biased history). There is no denying that the book is quite entertaining, if you enjoy reading about crimes that is. Just keep your skepticism at high alert.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful