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Prattlesnake

Arizona
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 13
  • helpful votes
  • 35
  • ratings
  • The Indignities of Being a Woman

  • By: Merrill Markoe, Megan Koester
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 131
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 123

The Indignities of Being a Woman candidly traces the history of womanhood and investigates how much things have really changed for womankind. By carefully x-raying areas such as body image, marriage, mental illness, fashion, and politics, this audiobook examines what it was like to be a woman in the past versus what it’s like now, when women are constantly told equality between the sexes exists but reality proves otherwise. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • snarky, cynical, snide and too damn true...

  • By sierra on 09-30-18

Sarcastic, Important, A+ Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-18-18

From cringes to chuckles to chortles to full blown lols, the story is a sarcastic and cynically dry laugh at the barrage of bull that has befallen women through thousands of years of human culture. Timely and important.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Shadow of What Was Lost

  • The Licanius Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: James Islington
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 25 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,818
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,875
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,841

It has been 20 years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augurs, once thought of almost as gods, were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs' fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion's Four Tenets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely a standout in the fantasy genre

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-29-15

Nuance, Rational Characters, No Love Story, No Wit

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-24-18

Would you listen to The Shadow of What Was Lost again? Why?

Again? Ain't nobody got time for that. The story is neither complex, confusing nor compelling enough to warrant another listen any time soon. Perhaps in the future, when I am old and gray, reflective and trying to untwine the knot of plots from all these books in my addled brain I will refresh myself with this tale.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Shadow of What Was Lost?

Answering this would be a spoiler for a book of big reveals, which this is not. This is a book driven by a calculated, steady plot trod by rational characters, not crescendos of "memorable moments"

What does Michael Kramer bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

A sometimes plodding tone in the voice of Kaladin Stormblessed. I can't say that his performance is as energetic as RC Bray or as well intonated as Tim Gerard Reynolds, but its still an above average performance.

Any additional comments?

No insufferable moments of betrayal, no obnoxious sit-com miscommunications. It's not a witty book full of charming quips and dashing lads, no gooey love story or McGuffin hunting, or philosophical diatribes. No heroic monologues, no paragon of evil, no paragon of good. This is a story with nuanced characters and a good plot for them to develop, because that's what we're looking for, eh?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Strange Death of Europe

  • Immigration, Identity, Islam
  • By: Douglas Murray
  • Narrated by: Robert Davies
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,441
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,306
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,301

The Strange Death of Europe is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Disturbing dystopian preview of tidal wave

  • By smarmer on 11-10-17

High on Rhetoric, Low on References

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-17

This is a good book. It’s well written to be easily understood and absorbed and the performance is on point.

It does rhetoric well, tapping into the narrative that liberals are sowing the demise of western culture and western civic governance by playing identity politics and refusing to examine the facts of Muslim/Islamic immigration honestly.

It does references poorly, in the audiobook anyway. While there may be references galore in the print version, this book “listens” much like a conversation style podcast would; say Joe Rogan Podcast, Waking Up with Sam Harris, The Rubin Report, etc. it’s as though Murray is extemporaneously giving an account of the European immigration crisis in a conversational format. One full of information from polls and events and news stories and death tolls and attacks et cetera et. al., but like a podcast conversation you have to take what’s being said for granted until you look it all up.

As long as you take that into account and know that you’re going to have to do a fair bit of research on the hard claims, then you’re good to go.

The books does make a lot of good points and is worth the money.

10 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Red Rising

  • By: Pierce Brown
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 16 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,785
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,496
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,457

Darrow is a Red, a member of the lowest caste in the color-coded society of the future. Like his fellow Reds, he works all day, believing that he and his people are making the surface of Mars livable for future generations. Yet he spends his life willingly, knowing that his blood and sweat will one day result in a better world for his children. But Darrow and his kind have been betrayed. Soon he discovers that humanity reached the surface generations ago. Vast cities and sprawling parks spread across the planet.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • excellent

  • By Emily on 05-07-17

Exciting, Interesting, and Entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-17

Entertaining and wonderfully narrated. Driving plot and exciting with good twists on common themes. Way of Kings + Hunger Games + Ender's Game.

Good look at societal structures that humans have been weaving forever. Class system similar to the districts in the Hunger Games and the we color in Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive. Main character Darrow is much like Kaladin in his display of leadership rather than tyranny and there's flavors of Ender's Game with militaristic and ruthless schooling.

A man who will do anything to break down the structure of society that keeps people enslaved.

  • Paradise

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 3
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 15 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 24,403
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22,908
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22,821

While the crew of the starship Flying Dutchman have been trying to assure people that hostile aliens do not have access to Earth, the UN Expeditionary Force has been stranded on the planet they nicknamed "Paradise". The Flying Dutchman is headed back out on another mission, and the UN wants the ship to find out the status of the humans on Paradise.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • running out of ideas...

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-08-17

Wonderful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-17

Just as good as the first two, I'm very much looking forward to the 4th.

  • We Are Legion (We Are Bob)

  • Bobiverse, Book 1
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61,733
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 57,928
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 57,820

Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street. Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ignore the Publisher's Summary! This is Amazing!

  • By PW on 04-12-17

Never Boring Speculative Exodus Sci-Fi

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-16

Quite interesting and entertaining speculation on how we might populate the universe and what happens when you upload consciousness into a machine capable of replicating itself. Never dull, plot moves forward and the voice acting sits dramatically well for the main character.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful