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The Divide audiobook cover art

Great outreach to a vulnerable population

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-20-19

We are all vulnerable to the siren call of government as intercessor between man and nature. But single mothers are particularly vulnerable. To them it must seem almost an irresistible temptation to view government as sole provider and protector. Short of that the corporate bureaucracy must seem nearly as tempting. But both of these are false gods. Single mothers with sons in particular must feel the strong pull toward the future environment in which their sons must make their way. This book shows great empathy for their plight. It reaches out for them in a way that no other book has.

Ship of Fools audiobook cover art

The best book you'll find by a prominent author.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-19

Those who wish to avoid the guillotine need to listen carefully to this book. Although it's advice is probably inadequate, it will set them on a course of discovery which may avail such. If there were one piece of advice I would add, it would be to look at what percentage of the population according to Gallup polls wanted increasing immigration from the 1960s through the present. Then compare that to the immigration rates over the same decades. What government can call itself legitimate if over 90% of its people oppose the manifest policies that determine the makeup of the people for the first four decades, and then a mere 75% of the people? It is a sad State of Affairs when someone like Tucker Carlson has to risk his career to speak only enough truth to plausibly stir to vague consciousness a mortally threatened Elite?

Seasteading audiobook cover art
  • Seasteading
  • How Floating Nations Will Restore the Environment, Enrich the Poor, Cure the Sick, and Liberate Humanity from Politicians
  • By: Joe Quirk, Patri Friedman
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt

An Important But Essentially Flawed Survey

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-07-18

The final chapter pretty well sums up the nature of this book:

Quirk and Friedman expound on their immigrant ancestors' hardship and struggle in "The American Experiment" as exemplars of their "moral" (their word) argument for "open borders" (their phrase).

Theirs is the heritage of what is now called "The Nation of Immigrants", not what Samuel Huntington called "The Nation of Settlers". As a result they are quite capable of elaborating on, if not appropriating, the culture upon which they rely. However, the foundation is lacking and, as such, the entire edifice crumbles to dust with the phrase "open borders".

The following is the proper principle upon which to found any frontier laboratory of states:

The current model of “human rights” must be replaced with a single, well defined, right to vote with your feet. This right to vote with your feet necessarily implies three material rights:

1. The material right to land.
2. The material right to transportation.
3. The material right to border enforcement.

#1 is obvious since you can’t put your social theory into practice without land. #2 is also obvious as people who cannot practically relocate cannot vote with their feet.

#3 _should_ be obvious but, due to the moral zeitgeist, it is not. Incarceration rates, particularly in the US, show us that there are two, fundamentally opposed, kinds of borders: Those that keep people out and those that keep people in. Of the two, the kind that keeps people in is least compatible with the right to vote with your feet. Even the US’s 13th Amendment to the Constitution has provision for involuntary servitude: Slavery for those imprisoned. We see a prison-industrial complex arising at the interface of government and capitalism to exploit this loophole in the 13th Amendment. The moral zeitgeist’s mandate is “let people in”. What is not admitted is this necessarily entails walls that keep people from leaving who are found to be “criminal” by the admitting society.

The moral zeitgeist has to reconcile its moral outrage at imprisonment with its moral outrage at border controls. The only realistic answer to this is absolute enforcement of free emigration combined with absolute tolerance of restrictive immigration.

The result would be compatible with all manner of new frontiers, as well as the reform of existing polities. Quirk and Friedman made a travesty of it.

Brave New World audiobook cover art

Will Huxley's Prophecy Ever Be Done MP Justice?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-12-18

If a motion picture franchise ever does "Brave New World" justice, it will almost certainly meet the same fate as Mike Judge's hilariously horrifying and entertaining "Idiocracy" and for the same reason: It strikes too close to home. That's why I fully expect the in-production SyFy minieries of "Brave New World" will _not_ do justice to Huxley's prophetic genius. Don't wait for it. Get this Audiobook.

Michael York's reading performance of this unabridged version Huxley's nightmare is a better application of his art than was the vaguely similar dystopian "Logan's Run".

A proper companion book is the rare, and now collectable, "Camp 38" by Jill von Konen. "Camp 38" succeeds, where "Island" fails, in presenting a third alternative to Huxley's all-too-realistic dilemma between "civilization" -- nowadays called "the transhuman condition" -- and "the savage reservation".

The chances of a movie franchise or TV miniseries doing "Camp 38" justice are far less, even, than those for "Brave New World".