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G Wallace

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  • reviews
  • 320
  • helpful votes
  • 78
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  • A Game of Thrones

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 1
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82,180
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 82,119

In a time long forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons off balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. As the cold returns, sinister forces are massing beyond the protective wall of the kingdom of Winterfell. To the south, the king's powers are failing, with his most trusted advisor mysteriously dead and enemies emerging from the throne's shadow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Review of First 5 Books

  • By DCinMI on 09-12-13

Lovely, Epic and Brutal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-18

Watching the HBO series inspired me to try this audiobook to see if I could learn more about the characters and backstory. This audiobook helps to fill in gaps that were left out of the TV show. As was expected, some of the events in the story were changed for television. Overall, this is a very entertaining medieval fantasy that blends the brutality of mankind with majestic scenic wonders described in beautiful detail. Every main character is being shaped by the events of the story and you feel their struggles as they confront choices that lay before them. Characters you hate at the beginning become those you sympathize with as the story unfolds, others you hate more. Nothing is simple, just like the real world. The story is also very relative to the real world and our current since of foreboding that seems to be pressing upon the nations.

This is a very non-politically correct story, which i appreciate. Also, it is definitely hard R rated and doesn't pull punches. The narration is good though it's a challenge to portray so many characters with unique voices. This is a long audiobook but time melts away quickly. Definitely worth the credit. I look forward to the next book in this series!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Breakthrough

  • By: Michael C. Grumley
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 10 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,789
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,574
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,561

Deep in the Caribbean Sea, a nuclear submarine is forced to suddenly abort its mission under mysterious circumstances. Strange facts begin to emerge that lead naval investigator, John Clay, to a small group of marine biologists who are quietly on the verge of making history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • AMAZING!!!

  • By FocusedOnTheJourney on 07-22-17

Dolphins, Aliens, Humans, guess who's the dumbest

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-26-17

Not quite what I expected. This story had some compelling elements but only kept my interest just enough to finish the book. Scott Brick does a solid narration job, but the story had a slow start and odd ending. Many characters were introduced at the beginning and many of those never developed beyond one dimension.

Overall I felt like there could have been a great story to tell, but it veered off track when the aliens appeared. Typical! From that point forward the story became more of a lecture on pollution and environmental issues. Don't get me wrong, there could have been a decent story to tell but the author chose to keep things simple and formulaic. Dolphins and aliens - smart, earth dwelling humans - stupid. And the aliens had to be the most boring representation of aliens ever portrayed in a novel that's essentially about aliens.

I won't get into all of the plot holes and implausible scenarios since this is a science fiction novel, but I guess the author plans to iron those out in book 2. One is enough for me. It did have some entertaining moments but I'm not interested in following the journey from here.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Earthcore

  • By: Scott Sigler
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 20 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,409
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,961
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,932

EarthCore is the company with the technology, the resources, and the guts to go after the mother lode. Young executive Connell Kirkland is the company's driving force, pushing himself and those around him to uncover the massive treasure. But at three miles below the surface, where the rocks are so hot they burn bare skin, something has been waiting for centuries. Waiting...and guarding. Kirkland and EarthCore are about to find out first-hand why this treasure has never been unearthed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slow start, but it gained momentum quick

  • By Jan on 12-15-17

One F-Bomb of A Book

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-17

Great narration, good story, bad language. This is the first Scott Sigler book I've listened to. The characters are well formulated and the story keeps you on edge constantly. There are very few parts of the book that drag, however, I felt the beginning was better than the ending. The story never really offered a likable character. Though well developed and "colorful", every character was also fairly deplorable. I didn't know whether I wanted them to die or not, and when they did I didn't really care.

I also felt a bit disappointed when the "monsters" debuted. The build-up was so great that the climax wasn't able to reach the expectations. It wasn't a complete bummer but I wish the "monsters" didn't come across so cartoonish. Deadly, but still cartoonish. At least the monsters didn't drop f-bombs every sentence like EVERY other character did, imo. Again, the worst element of the story was the lack of a hero, unless you sympathize with self absorbed, selfish, egotistical personalities.

Overall, apart from the swearing, it was quite entertaining and worth the credit.

0 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Final Day

  • By: William R. Forstchen
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 12 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,045
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,590
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,582

The highly anticipated follow-up to William R. Forstchen's New York Times best-sellers, One Second After and One Year After, The Final Day immerses listeners once more in the story of our nation's struggle to rebuild itself after an electromagnetic pulse wipes out all electricity and plunges the country into darkness, starvation, and terror.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The narrator didn't ruin it for me..

  • By shelley on 01-04-17

Good But Not Great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-17

One Second After set the bar as one of the most powerful TEOTWAWKI novels dealing with the prospects of an EMP aftermath in the USA. It presented information and plausible "what if" scenarios in a very well researched and methodical manner. It undoubtedly has been the catalysts for many would-be preppers. That book set a standard of quality hard to match with respects to story, plot, suspense and narration.

As such, Mr. Forstchen saw the opportunity to milk the success of the first book with 2 more following in this series. Neither One Year Later nor this book match the bar of the first. The writing quality of this novel is good but it's hurt by a poor plot, little action and less effective narration. There were several parts of the book that drug on without much importance to the overall plot other than to allow the author to give us a history lesson, or try and conjure a Norman Rockwell archetypal image with words.

I'm not trying to be too critical because this series as a whole is better than most of the post apocalyptic dystopian series that are out there (IMHO). I hope Mr. Forstchen doesn't quit providing us books within this genre, though I'd prefer he move on from the OVERABUNDANCE of EMP related books that have come out recently. It's worth the credit to get closure on this story, but it's not an audiobook that I will return to any time soon.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Under a Tell-Tale Sky

  • Disruption, Book 1
  • By: R.E. McDermott
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,054
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 974
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 968

When a massive solar flare fries the electrical grid, Captain Jordan Hughes' problems are just starting. Stranded far from home with a now-priceless cargo of fuel and a restless crew, Hughes weighs his options as violence worsens ashore and the world crumbles around the secure little world of his ship, the Pecos Trader.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Guy-tainment in a Post Apocalyptic World

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 08-19-17

Worth A Credit

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-28-16

I just finished listening to Bobby Akart's "36 Hours" & "Zero Hour" which describes to outcome of major CME blackout event. It prefaced the apocalyptic event with lots of science and factoids. This Novel forgoes the CME science and practically thrust the characters and listener into a grid down scenario much like "Zero Hour". The major difference is how this author spins multiple plot threads and well described locals from the opening sequence of events.

At first I thought this was an overly ambitious attempt of an author trying to put his unique spin on the TEOTWAWKI genre, which it is, but it worked. During the first 30 minutes into the book I was considering trying to get my credit back, but the story took a foothold and I began to care about the character's various struggles. It's apparent that McDermott put a lot of study and thought into the settings and events of this novel. It did what any novel should do - Entertain. I don't think diehard preppers and survivalist will give this book any consideration, but it does pose a lot of "what if" scenarios and offers some very good advise. However, and most importantly, it doesn't try to be a scouts guide. You're enveloped in a story you don't want to end, which it doesn't, and I eagerly bought the next book of the series. It too will have you wanting more.

Kevin Pierce once again narrates in his usual style. His range of voices and dialects isn't overwhelming but passable. I give this book high marks for taking this genre into a well crafted land and sea adventure series with plenty of action and suspense. It's worth your credit.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • 36 Hours

  • The Blackout Series, Book 1
  • By: Bobby Akart
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,209
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,130
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,127

This is not the story of preppers with stockpiles of food, weapons, and a hidden bunker. This is the story of Colton Ryman, his stay-at-home wife, Madison, and their teenage daughter, Alex. In 36 Hours, the Ryman family and the rest of the world will be thrust into the darkness of a post-apocalyptic world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A "Pre-Apocalyptic" book with tons of action

  • By Brian on 09-14-16

Post Modern Alas, Babylon

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-16

Just discovered this author, read the reviews, and figured I'd give it a try. For the most part this is a well crafted intro into a presumably long post-apocalyptic series to come. The author seems to have been heavily influenced by the narrative style of the classic book "Alas, Babylon", in that he wants to create a foundation of science and character development versus immediate Mad Max. Obviously this book sets up a scenario where a series of CME's cripple and destroy our electric infrastructure, versus an immediate nuclear exchange annihilation. This book is all about the tense build up to the moment of reckoning. The second book in this series (I just finished it) moves the story from preparation into survival.

Unlike many post-apocalyptic novels, this book portrays an ordinary family living an ordinary status-quo lifestyle, unaware of the concept of "prepping". They see the imminent signs of doom and learn fast that they need to prepare quickly and quietly. The timeline is set in the near future with the assertion that the Clinton's are once again at the helm of leadership and our civil liberties are being systematically flushed away. This is portrayed in several events during the story.

Overall a well written book with lots of things to consider. I appreciate the Christian context and lack of cursing. The author mostly captures the realism of our society and the delusion of our government and media. My one complaint is with the narration, though minor. Kevin Pierce narrates like a grandpa reading to his grandchildren, which moderates the overall tone. I would personally like to hear more emphatic passion expressed in this type of story.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Behold, Darkness and Sorrow

  • Seven Cows, Ugly and Gaunt, Book One
  • By: Mark Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 8 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 846
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 778
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 776

Ambitious college student Daniel Walker has his world turned upside down when he begins having prophetic dreams about the judgment coming upon America. Through one of his dreams, Daniel learns of an imminent threat of an EMP attack that will wipe out America's electric grid and all computerized devices, sending the country into a technological dark age. Living in a nation where all life-sustaining systems of support are completely dependent on electricity and computers, the odds for survival are dismal.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Big fan

  • By Brandon on 03-22-16

More of the Same

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-16

OK, I don't want to be harsh. I like Mark Goodwin books. However, the more audiobooks of his that I listen to the more I see the formulaic approach he uses to create his now third miniseries. Don't get me wrong, they all have their merits, but they all have certain similarities that have me wanting to search out new and different authors before returning and starting a series like this. Thankfully, perhaps, this genre is now infused with a wide range of talent to pick from, though finding it may take some trial and error since everyone seems to support their favorite authors and the reviews sometime seem too disingenuous.

As a Christian I'm glad that some Christian authors have found their niche in this genre, but that in and of itself doesn't guarantee well written fiction or adequate survival instruction. In my opinion, Mark Goodwin is at his best when he's developing a backdrop to his stories and describing the world through real current events. He tends to get somewhat bogged down in detail with his main characters and their immediate circumstances. His stories often ebb and flow between mundane issues and fast paced action and the momentum isn't consistent.

That being said, his books (this one included) is fairly well written and offers insightful Biblical references that describe a very real threat. Character development was good though somewhat stereotypical to this genre. There wasn't much new in the way of preparedness except to show how unprepared the main characters were. Overall and enjoyable but somewhat forgettable story.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The World Burns: A Post-Apocalyptic Story

  • By: Boyd Craven III
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 1 hr and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

Tension grips the country as the nuclear talks with Iran start to go poorly. This is largely ignored by the populace, and the threat of war goes unheeded.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Prepper "Story" and my rant on phoney reviews...

  • By Jan on 08-29-15

Par for the Course

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-16

If this book were written 10 years ago then it might be fresh and thought provoking. However, with a slew of authors (Boyd Craven III included) jumping on the bandwagon of dystopian TEOTWAWKI novels (or series) in the past few years, its becoming hard to tell them apart. It also seems as though narrator Kevin Pierce is fully entrenched in this genre, which further fuses these stories into one big cocktail of chaos.

This story doesn't bring anything new to the table except the ridiculous short length. At least you can get your apocalyptic fix without having to wade through several hours of character building narrative. The characters here are mostly cardboard cutouts of this genre with plot elements you've "heard" many times before. It's not necessarily bad, but it's not great fiction either. This is mostly an attempt to see how many books, or audiobooks, can be sold by this author with this series. If this first book is a teaser of what's to come then I'm doubtful I'll spend the time and credits to patiently wait for the author to churn out a never ending money hole saga. There are other series out there that are better, or at least just as good, if you believe 3 or 4 full length novels are enough to wrap up a post-apocalyptic series and move on.

Overall a good filler while you wait for the next novel in your favorite series to come out, but not really worth the 1 credit.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • 1984

  • New Classic Edition
  • By: George Orwell
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,184
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,308
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,337

George Orwell depicts a gray, totalitarian world dominated by Big Brother and its vast network of agents, including the Thought Police - a world in which news is manufactured according to the authorities' will and people live tepid lives by rote. Winston Smith, a hero with no heroic qualities, longs only for truth and decency. But living in a social system in which privacy does not exist and where those with unorthodox ideas are brainwashed or put to death, he knows there is no hope for him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Come one, Come all into 1984!

  • By Kit McIlvaine (GirlPluggedN) on 02-18-08

40 Years Too Early

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-16

I've always heard the term "Orwellian" and thought I understood its true meaning until I finally got this audiobook and listened to it. WOW! What was once fiction is now nearly fact. Our current government, media and corporate oligarchy is truly a fascist conglomerate intent on controlling the population. If you still think you can "vote" your way back to freedom WAKE UP! The power elites want you to think you have some control. Read the current headlines and listen to political and corporate spin and then compare it to this book. COME QUICKLY LORD JESUS!!

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Wormwood

  • By: Micah Ackerman
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 306
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 285
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 286

Nate Wilder suffers from panic attacks triggered by news reports of world catastrophes even when, rationally, the events should not affect him. Nate becomes a prepper to help him cope with the anxiety, stocking a makeshift shelter. So when nuclear disaster actually strikes home, Nate must employ truly heroic courage or fold to his fears. But in the aftermath of the bombs, it quickly becomes apparent that surviving the attack is just the beginning - there is far worse yet to come.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Just Shoot Me

  • By 3AM Mom on 03-10-16

Too Unrealistic

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-31-15

I thought I was in for a real treat with all of the positive reviews this book received. It's rare to find an apocalyptic novel dealing with the harsh realities of a nuclear holocaust. I must admit that I'm writing this review while only 3/4 of the way through, however, I don't really want to finish it. There are just too many mistakes with this story to make it believable and worthy as a "how to survive" novel. It's apparent the author never handled a glock pistol, understands food storage, or understands construction. I know I may be nitpicking, but these things, along with others, eat away at the credibility of the author and this story.

Alas, Babylon was written over 50 years ago and it was far more realistic. Wormwood is a simple story about an average guy who's too uptight and pensive to speak to girls and instead lusts after his co-worker in a weird sort of way. Of course it takes a nuclear war for he and she to fall madly in love and get it on in the basement of where they worked. They survive the blast and eventually crawl out to observe the world around them. As if this fantasy isn't enough for the author, he introduces a character named Simon who's the obligatory fanatic fundamentalist christian that crawls out from his homemade bunker to impose his beliefs to this new world. Yeah, right. I guess this is an attempt to make this novel stand apart from the Christian perspective of other authors in this genre.

I could go on but I won't. There are better audiobooks out there if you like this genre.

5 of 9 people found this review helpful