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Madison

the Great and Terrible
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 31
  • ratings
  • Born a Crime

  • Stories from a South African Childhood
  • By: Trevor Noah
  • Narrated by: Trevor Noah
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 112,391
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 104,092
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 103,595

One of the comedy world's fastest-rising stars tells his wild coming of age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book and perfect narration

  • By Marilyn Armstrong on 12-15-16

A Whirlwind of Life Experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

I can't begin to describe how much I loved this book. I honestly think listening is the best way to experience this book so I'd say don't hesitate in using that credit.

I first heard of Trevor Noah because of his comedy specials on Netflix. Then I noticed his book in my Audible recommendations. I believe I actually had seen it a couple of times before, but hadn't paid attention until I actually recognized who it was about. I hesitated at first because I know myself. Even though I'm trying to get better and listen to more non-fiction, I didn't know if I'd actually be able to stick it out the whole way through.

However this book surprised me in how quickly it grasped my attention and interest. I could hardly put it down once I had started. This book is told in the form of anecdotes that hop around a bit across the timeline of Trevor's childhood. It can get a little fuzzy in the middle about what point of his childhood he was at during that particular story, but it isn't off-putting at all. Also Trevor's mom is probably my favorite part of it all.

This book enraptured me and made me laugh and made me cry and open my eyes to what life was like during Apartheid that I had never realized. It is probably my favorite book that I've read all year and I just hope that others give it a chance and love it just as much.

0 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Changeling

  • A Novel of Sorcery and Society
  • By: Molly Harper
  • Narrated by: Amanda Ronconi
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,665
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,508
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,502

If 14-year-old Cassandra Reed makes it through her first day at Miss Castwell’s Institute for the Magical Instruction of Young Ladies without anyone discovering her secret, maybe, just maybe, she’ll let herself believe that she really does belong at Miss Castwell’s. Except Cassandra Reed’s real name is Sarah Smith and up until now, she lived her whole life in the Warren, serving a magical family, the Winters, as all non-magical “Snipes” are bound by magical Guardian law to do. That is, until one day, Sarah accidentally levitates Mrs. Winter’s favorite vase in the parlor.... 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful!

  • By Amazon Customer on 08-23-18

Of Magical Schools and Silver Dragonflies

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

I generally try not to get into series books. Especially if the rest of the series isn't out yet, but I wanted something magical to get me in the mood for Halloween this year and this is one of the books I chose to do it.

I've never listened to anything else by Molly Harper, so I can't be the one to compare this to her previous works, but I really enjoyed this one. I have such a soft spot for witches and magic, and this book definitely hit all the right buttons for me. Molly Harper really did know how to draw me into the world and the characters.

I really enjoyed the journey and look forward to any other books that come out, when they come out. It's not a series I would obsessively wait for more volumes of, but I wouldn't hesitate to get the next one if it were to come out. I hope you give it a try and enjoy it too!

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Dead Witch Walking

  • By: Kim Harrison
  • Narrated by: Marguerite Gavin
  • Length: 13 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,692
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,551
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,561

Rachel Morgan is a runner with the Inderland Runner Services, apprehending law-breakers throughout Cincinnati. She's also a witch, one of the many Inderlanders who revealed themselves after a genetically engineered virus wiped out 50 percent of humanity. Witches, warlocks, vampires, werewolves: the creatures of dreams and nightmares have lived beside humans for centuries, hiding their powers. But now they've stopped hiding, and nothing will be the same.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • wildly entertaining

  • By Patti on 09-27-07

Good Bones, Rotten Meat, and Not Enough Flesh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

Okay first I'm going to start out and say that Kim Harrison paints an interesting fantasy world filled with possibility as it takes on a what-if scenario of what our world would be like if magical creatures had always existed but were the hidden minority until a plague breaks out that wipes out a majority of the human race. Allowing the minority to become the majority. The characters are snappy and snarky and have some good banter moments too.

However, while the cast of characters can have a good voice, that doesn't make them the type of characters you want to listen to. I think the world is inspired, but our main character, Rachel, is all over the place. She's introduced as someone who is under-appreciated and under-utilized in what would be considered the magical police force/bounty hunter service because of her boss hating her and giving her all the bad runs. (I realize I'm about to go and summarize a bit of the beginning of this book before I can really get into why Rachel as a character bothers me)

Anyone who quits the force, doesn't survive to see the next day because they're slapped with a death warrant unless they buy out their contract. So when Rachel quits alongside one of her better liked/respected co-workers, Ivy, she's a Dead Witch Walking. Ivy is a vampire from an old money family so she was able to buy out her contract. Rachel is not as lucky financially, but thank goodness she has Ivy on her side, along with a feisty pixie man named Jenks. They're basically the entire reason she's not dead within the first few hours of her quitting. In order to get the magical police force off her back, she's going to try and take down one of biggest bads that the force hasn't been able to pin down, a politician that nobody is sure if he's human or magical who seems to be a kingpin of bio-drugs and brimstone. Her life is riding on her pulling off the biggest run of all time.

Sounds really interesting on paper right? Like the bones of it are there and you can't wait to see what Rachel can do now with the odds stacked against her, but with nothing left to lose and being able to prove just how the force missed their opportunity with her??

It's too bad that it's not how it turns out. Rachel proves herself to be impatient and foolhardy and her attempts to bag this baddy are laughable. Her powers seem extremely limited and she can't seem to carry out a plan without bungling it somehow with her unpreparedness. I had to pause and walk away a couple of times during this book. Which ties into why I find Rachel hard to like. She doesn't seem to have very much character growth in this book. It's great that she's flawed but the way she doesn't seem to really learn from her mistakes is maddening.

ALSO, as I said before Ivy the vampire and Jenks the pixie are the only reasons she's alive. Ivy and her move into a safer area that turns out to be the perfect place for Rachel to really survive since her attackers can't reach her. Thank you, Ivy, for managing to get a hold of such a place and also for caring so much about Rachel and trying to keep her alive. You'd think that Rachel must really learn to trust and respect Ivy even with her initial reservations about her being a vampire. But she barely manages to accomplish this lesson 3/4ths of the way into the book. From the beginning, she's on edge and doesn't trust Ivy an inch. It's clear Rachel is uncomfortable with vampires from the get go (which makes it crazy to me that she agreed or offered to move in with Ivy in the first place), but it should be part of her own character arc for this first book for her to get over it and come to trust the vampire as a friend at the very least. Every scene with the two of them once they've moved in together just bothers me because Rachel can't seem to grow past her discomfort.

There's the added factor of how Rachel deep down is also attracted to vampires and had a sexual close call with Ivy because she kept giving Ivy all the right signals? And the reason this really bothers me is because Ivy is written as a bisexual character who's attracted to Rachel but also respects Rachel enough to try to keep her distance even though it goes against her vampire instincts. And Ivy in turn is constantly viewed through a distrustful gaze and is even demonized a bit at the midpoint of the book where Rachel thinks Ivy was going "full vamp" on her and was going to kill her, but learned that Ivy was there to warn her about some danger. And even after learning that Ivy was trying to help her, Rachel didn't feel any remorse for not trusting Ivy afterwards? It might just be me taking things too seriously, but it just really didn't sit right with me that the only LGBT character in this book (that also is the one who helps our main character the most) gets demonized for a majority of the book and that apparently Ivy getting all sexual and "vampy" is the main character's most debilitating fear?? Just...... wow. Thanks, I hate it.

Also just to mention, there's a love interest that pops up 3/4ths of the way into this book that everybody immediately was like "Oh Rachel you and this guy spent time trapped in rodent bodies! You must be into each other!! You guys touched tails on the ride home from being rescued! You must want to bone!!" and I just want to say "what the fuck" to this scene. Thanks I hate that too.

This could've been a great story and much more fleshed out as the first book in the series. I'm sure things get fleshed out better later, but I don't want to continue with it. This book was enough for me. There are parts that I enjoyed even though I fundamentally just do not agree with the emotional and fundamental structure of this book, but I don't think it's worth it to me to try and stick it out for more.

  • The Late Bloomers' Club

  • By: Louise Miller
  • Narrated by: Emily Rankin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 57
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 55

Nora, the owner of a diner, is happy serving up apple cider donuts. But her life is soon shaken when she discovers she and her younger sister Kit stand to inherit the home and land of the town's beloved cake lady, Peggy Johnson. Kit, an aspiring - and broke - filmmaker thinks her problems are solved when she and Nora find out Peggy was in the process of selling the land to a big-box developer. The people of Guthrie are divided - some want the opportunities the development will bring, while others are staunchly against it - and they aren't afraid to leave their opinions with their tips.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect Summer read

  • By D. Cassidy on 08-06-18

Workin' 9 to 5! What a way to make a livin'.....

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-13-18

I picked up this one because it sounded cute and I needed a little fluff in my life.

What I didn't expect was how much anxiety listening to this book caused me. Holy moly, there was so much money being spent and being in debt that it had my head reeling a bit. It all worked out in the end, but just thinking about all the financial burden that was piling up had me going. I'm probably making this sound bigger than it is, but just figured I'd throw that out there for anybody who might be sensitive to that.

ANYWAYS, this book was fun and I enjoyed the pacing and the characters. The romance is very chaste and just super sweet and sincere. Elliot Danforth is too good to be true, but that doesn't make it a bad thing. He's the representative for the big corporation, but he genuinely cares about the town and what they have to say. He's sensitive, shy, outdoorsy, and nerdy and just an adorable man altogether.

The romance is a part of the book, but it doesn't overwhelm the book. Another big part of the book is about the relationship between Nora and her little sister, Kit. They have a somewhat tumultuous relationship due to their age difference and the emotional baggage from their parents passing too soon. Kit is a free spirit who doesn't want to be tied down in life, and Nora is the hardworking and grounded one. I like that the book didn't demonize or shame Kit in the way she chooses to live her life, but I do feel like she got off way too easy for her irresponsible nature and how she pushed her burdens onto Nora? She kind of just floated on in and expected her sister to take care of everything when she hadn't bothered to visit in years. When they finally butted heads, it didn't feel like everything that needed to be said was said.

But that might just be me projecting my feelings. I know if my sister had come to me to ask for me to use all my money and to take out a loan for her movie project while I was working full-time and owned my own business and was trying to make ends meet, I wouldn't do it. Take her in? Yes. Help her get back on her feet? Yes. Give her a job to work on some savings for her project? Of course. A loan for 50 grand while trying to keep a diner afloat? Not happening.

Nora is a much more generous and trusting soul than I am, though. And her town is filled with great people. It's all very comforting in other ways and Emily Rankin does a great job with her narration. I definitely do recommend this to anybody who wants some small town fluff and romance. My feelings on the sister conflict don't affect my overall opinion. I think this is a good time spent even if there are some things in the writing choices I don't agree with. I hope you give it a chance and that you enjoy it too!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Cop Town

  • By: Karin Slaughter
  • Narrated by: Kathleen Early
  • Length: 14 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,182
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,809
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,819

Atlanta, 1974: It's Kate Murphy's first day on the job, and the Atlanta Police Department is seething after the murder of an officer. Before the day has barely begun, she already suspects she's not cut out to be a cop. Her male uniform is too big, she can't handle a gun, and she's rapidly learning that the APD is hardly a place that welcomes women. Worse still, in the ensuing manhunt she'll be partnered with Maggie Lawson, a cop with her own ax to grind.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding, Gutsy Crime Novel Read by a Master

  • By Charles Atkinson on 07-08-14

Uncouth and Unapologetic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-18

I snagged this book under a misconception that it was a nonfiction work during the 2-for-1 Thriller sale, but I can't say that I regret it in the slightest.

I can't vouch or contest against the accuracies of the depiction of 1970s Atlanta. It's before my time and on a different coast from what I've grown up in. That being said, Karin Slaughter definitely knows how to paint a picture with her words and make it feel real to you. I was definitely immersed into the setting, not only just by describing the location, but especially through the characters.

There's no rose-colored glasses in this. There's a whole lot of vulgarity, racism, homophobia, rampant use of slurs, sexism, mentions of sexual assault and rape, sex scenes, a bit of gore, etc. As a reader, you either take it in stride as part of the setting or you hate yourself for wasting the credit. It's not easy to get through this book, you end up loving and/or hating it.

I personally really enjoyed it for how everyone is horribly flawed. Especially the main women that we follow along with. They feel like they could be real people based on how flawed they are and I feel like that's a big part of why I enjoyed listening to this book. I love it when you get to experience characters who you feel like are real and are learning and changing. It's something that every author strives for I'm sure, but not every story really sells it and Karin's got a knack for it alongside being able to pull her audience into the storyline and keep them there once she's hooked you in.

There's also a lot of skill in the narrating, and I have to commend Kathleen Earliy for her wonderful work. I really enjoyed her as a narrator and wouldn't hesitate on another book if she's the one narrating.

I feel like I should also mention that this story doesn't lead to a whole upheaval against the systematic racism and sexism presented in this setting. It can kind of feel like an underdog story where the underdog ends up back where it started in the grand scheme of things, but the main story lies in the growth of our main characters. Things do change, even if it's not in the satisfying way a major comeuppance feels like. And I mean, there IS some post-climax comeuppance that was majorly satisfying towards one of the characters in the book that Maggie gets to dish out. I just meant that there's not a big comeuppance towards those in the system.

However, there's the promise of things changing. The world they're living in is progressing forward and that it's leaving behind those who refuse to change with it.

  • Geekerella

  • A Novel
  • By: Ashley Poston
  • Narrated by: Eileen Stevens, Tristan Morris
  • Length: 10 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,376
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,300
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,299

Geek girl Elle Wittimer lives and breathes Starfield, the classic science-fiction series she grew up watching with her late father. So when she sees a cosplay contest for a new Starfield movie, she has to enter. The prize? An invitation to the ExcelsiCon Cosplay Ball and a meet-and-greet with the actor slated to play Federation Prince Carmindor in the reboot. With savings from her gig at the Magic Pumpkin food truck and her dad's old costume, Elle's determined to win - unless her stepsisters get there first.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fresh new take on the Cinderella tale

  • By Kathleen Y. Danis on 05-02-17

Holy [Insert Nerd Thing Here], Batman!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-18

I’m a bit of a nut for fairytale retellings and romance, and Cinderella is a story that I know is both standard and cliche at this point. I can’t help but enjoy it regardless.

This was a fun retelling and I liked the premise, but had a hard time slogging through the execution. The characters were fun (Sage is the best, no contest), but our main characters were at times hard to stomach due to cornballness and just their internal turmoil just did not hit me at all emotionally. Elle could be especially grating because of how much of an entitled, obsessive fan she was.

I know it was supposed to spark more friction in the plot, but it was the type of person I really couldn’t rally behind. Especially when we were getting Darien’s point of view to reassure that he’s a sympathetic character alongside her hating on him. I feel like it could’ve been presented in a better way so we could really support our heroine as well as our hero. Like legitimate criticisms besides whining about how he’s too pretty and too shallow to play the main character of her favorite series.

I still enjoyed parts of it, but the second half of it was just me being amused and groaning over the cheese and poor decisions. There’s only so much my tolerance can take.

BUT if you are someone who likes fluffy, light teen romance and just enjoy the feeling of secondhand embarrassment then I’d say go for it. It was interesting and I did like the concept. The narrators did a great job as well, although Tristan Morris sounds like the understudy for a guy who does commercial voices. It’s not a bad thing but it’s definitely a different thing that I’m not sure how I feel about. Eileen Stevens was very solid and I liked listening to her voice in general.

It’s not a great story though and I feel like it relies too much on just the outline of Cinderella even though it tries to be different. None of the characters feel real though. It’s just fluff tied up with a neat little bow of happy endings and online fan pop culture references. Also with that as you will.

  • I See You

  • By: Clare Mackintosh
  • Narrated by: Rachel Atkins
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,225
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,037
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,033

Every morning and evening, Zoe Walker takes the same route to the train station, waits at a certain place on the platform, finds her favorite spot in the car, never suspecting that someone is watching her. It all starts with a classified ad. During her commute home one night, while glancing through her local paper, Zoe sees her own face staring back at her - a grainy photo along with a phone number and a listing for a website called FindTheOne.com.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Commuters Beware!

  • By Carole T. on 02-23-17

A Thriller for the Average Zoe

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

I feel like if you’re an experienced thriller listener then this is not the book for you. There are twists and turns, but overall the story is basic structure when it comes down to it.

That’s not to say I didn’t enjoy it or wasn’t kept guessing on who could possibly be behind it all. However, I feel like those who love listening to thrillers and do so regularly would probably wouldn’t get too invested in this. Also those who enjoy a totally 100% realistic turn of events would probably be turned off.

For me though, I enjoyed it for the most part. There was quite a bit of dragging through the middle (I think it was four hours in?) where it felt like the plot wasn’t moving forward at all, but once the action picks up again, it definitely has your attention. There were a lot of engaging characters that make up the cast and while our victim and average, everyday woman, Zoe, is our main point of view, the story splits itself between three point of views including a cop named Kelly who’s on the case, and the mysterious perpetrator who gives their creepy point of view every now and again.

I feel like the three point of views were portrayed rather poorly? I mean, the creeper’s point of view was easy to pick out of course, but I don’t remember when it first switched from Zoe to Kelly. There wasn’t a distinct change when it came to telling their point of views so it all melded together in my head. Along with almost wondering if their was a third woman’s point of view because of how confused I was during the first few switches in point of view. I finally got with the program later on once the characters were all established, but I’m not sure if it was because of the narrator or the writing style or just my own inattention as I listened while working.

It could’ve been a combo of all three, but I remember trying to go back and check what I missed because it was kind of jarring not knowing who was who.

As for the Narrator, she grew on me, but I wasn’t totally sold. She’s got a good voice, but her variation between characters wasn’t the strongest that I’ve heard and I feel like the right narrator could’ve made all the difference in really getting sucked into the story. However, I did get into the story so she still did her job well.

The story itself has interesting concepts and I feel like it really gets you going in the beginning. You’ll be suspecting every character you can throughout it. You really feel like Zoe can’t trust anyone she has close to her in her life.

Kelly is my favorite along with Nick because they make a fun cop duo once they get going. I feel like her circumstance on how she gets away with things is unrealistic, but I still find her as a character I really enjoyed and I liked her development as she moves forward through the story.

So to summarize, I enjoyed it. I feel like experienced thriller readers won’t be as sold into it, but it’s a story that kept my attention throughout my work day and that I couldn’t really put down when I got home from work and that makes it a positive recommendation from me.

  • Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda

  • By: Becky Albertalli
  • Narrated by: Michael Crouch
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,404
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,085
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,089

Sixteen-year-old and not-so-openly gay Simon Spier prefers to save his drama for the school musical. But when an email falls into the wrong hands, his secret is at risk of being thrust into the spotlight. Now Simon is actually being blackmailed: If he doesn't play wingman for class clown Martin, his sexual identity will become everyone's business. Worse, the privacy of Blue, the pen name of the boy he's been emailing with, will be compromised.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Crouch should be getting another award

  • By T. N. Taylor on 03-15-18

Refreshingly Honest and Fetishization free!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-18

I’ve got to give Becky Albertalli major props for the way she handled this story and for just great writing in general.

It’s a simple story, but it’s overflowing with a wonderful and genuine cast of characters that you’ll come to recognize and kind of fall in love with.

And I definitely came to love Simon as the narrator of the story. He’s a ham and has a flair for the dramatic and romantic, but also is someone who’s just beautifully relatable and flawed in his own way. I loved being on this personal journey with him and coming to love him and cheer for him through the trials he goes through.

But yes. As I said it’s a simple story but the characters are complex. I adore romance stories, but nothing grabs me more and sticks with me than one I feel was written with the heart and honesty that this one has been. ESPECIALLY as a book written and devoted to LGBT romance.

God this book is so damn refreshing when it comes to its writing. Nothing is fetishized about it in the way I see often for romance books in the LGBT romance section. Romance books in general tend to be focused on the sexy parts about romance, but this book focused on trying to keep it real as well as optimistic and I can’t thank the author more for it.

So thank you Becky and thank you Michael Crouch for the wonderful narration. I loved it!!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Other Daughter

  • A Novel
  • By: Lauren Willig
  • Narrated by: Nicola Barber
  • Length: 10 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,598
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,451
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,449

Raised in a poor yet genteel household, Rachel Woodley is working in France as a governess when she receives news that her mother has died suddenly. Grief stricken, she returns to the small town in England where she was raised to clear out the cottage...and finds a cutting from a London society magazine, with a photograph of her supposedly deceased father dated all of three month before. He's an earl, respected and influential, and he is standing with another daughter - his legitimate daughter.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Adequate.

  • By Mary C. on 08-12-15

Fun in the moment but Forgettable in the long run

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-18

I agree with the sentiment that it's "entertaining if you don't think too hard about it" that's been mentioned in previous reviews.

I think that Nicola Barber did a splendid job with the narration. The writing also does keep you going and entertained throughout the story, but in the end it's not the most memorable read. It isn't something I feel like I'd be interested enough to go back and re-listen to, but that's just me personally.

I loved the potential of the setting and premise, but it just didn't feel like satisfying story when it was all set and done.

  • Wishing for a Highlander

  • Highland Wishes, Volume 1
  • By: Jessi Gage
  • Narrated by: Marian Hussey
  • Length: 10 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,554
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,414
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,418

Single-and-pregnant museum worker Melanie voices an idle wish while examining a Scottish artifact, that a Highland warrior would sweep her off her feet and help her forget her cheating ex. The last thing she expects is for her wish to be granted. Magically transported to the middle of a clan skirmish in the 16th-century Highlands, she comes face to face with her kilted fantasy man.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • as a man, romance novels are a new interest to me.

  • By Dusty on 03-02-16

Time Travel, Highlanders, and Babies, Oh my!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-17

First off, I have today that Marian Hussey does THE MOST excellent job narrating this. She has such an amazing array of accents and every character has their own distinction. It was fun listening to her have fun with the characters!

Secondly, this story was a fun and interesting ride. I genuinely enjoyed it and the various characters brought into it.

I can understand that there are other reviewers who are looking for the next Outlander and were disappointed with this possibly, but this story is pretty much exactly what it says on the tin. A fluffy romance between a modern women and a 17th century scotsman mixed with bits of angst and drama and magic. It's fun, but it's not someone's personal historical romance epic.

And if I were to be blunt, I'd say the romance develops too quickly but it's what I'd kind of expect from such a novel. Doesn't mean it's not good or worth a listen. I just means not to make your expectations too high of a standard that you can't enjoy something for what it is.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful