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Timothy

College Station, TX, United States
  • 84
  • reviews
  • 258
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  • 128
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  • After On

  • A Novel of Silicon Valley
  • By: Rob Reid
  • Narrated by: Sean Kenin, January LaVoy, Felicia Day, and others
  • Length: 22 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,094
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,961
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,959

Meet Phluttr - a diabolically addictive new social network and a villainess, heroine, enemy, and/or bestie to millions. Phluttr has ingested every fact and message ever sent to, from, and about her innumerable users. Her capabilities astound her makers - and they don't even know the tenth of it. But what's the purpose of this stunning creation? Is it a front for something even darker and more powerful than the NSA?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book with great performances!

  • By Amazon Kunde on 08-11-17

Not as good as "Year One", but pretty good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

Rob Reid's first book, "Year One", is great. In my review of that book I called Reid "the true successor to Douglas Adams".

Hitchhiker's Guide is the gold standard of sci-fi comedy. A true classic. In "Year One", Rob Reid created a book that can be favorably compared to HG, and that's saying something.

Unfortunately, I did not find "After On" to be nearly as good. It's good -- in fact, it's really good -- but the author set the bar high with "Year One".

One thing I will say about this book: it presents some near-future ideas that are really interesting and seem more and more plausible as time goes by. If things play out as he describes, there is a "brave new world" coming that some of us might find very disturbing.

  • A Gift of Time

  • By: Jerry Merritt
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,655
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,296
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,276

When Micajah Fenton discovers a crater in his front yard with a broken time glider in the bottom and a naked, virtual woman on his lawn, he delays his plans to kill himself. While helping repair the marooned time traveler's glider, Cager realizes it can return him to his past to correct a mistake that had haunted him his entire life. As payment for his help, the virtual creature living in the circuitry of the marooned glider, sends Cager back in time as his 10-year-old self.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Smart and original

  • By J. OBrennan on 12-29-17

The end ruined it for me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

This is a cool time-travel story. Very similar in some ways to "The First Fifteen Lives of Harry August" (which is a superior book IMO). It plays with a lot of interesting ideas, and I really enjoyed it.... right up until the end.

Without any spoilers, I will just say that the way the story is resolved is so ridiculous and so out of sync with the rest of the story, it kind of ruined the whole thing for me.

And beside that, there is an epilogue that goes even farther into ridiculous territory. The ultimate end of the story described in the epilogue is .... well, it almost makes me question the author's sanity. I mean, the context seems to indicate that the author feels he is describing a satisfying, positive ending to his story when in fact he's turning his characters into the greatest villains the world has ever seen.

It would be like if someone wrote a book about Adolf Hitler as a good guy and ended the book describing the Holocaust as a positive final act of a good person.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Neverwhere

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,269
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,255

Richard Mayhew is a young man with a good heart and an ordinary life, which is changed forever when he stops to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London sidewalk. His small act of kindness propels him into a world he never dreamed existed. There are people who fall through the cracks, and Richard has become one of them. And he must learn to survive in this city of shadows and darkness, monsters and saints, murderers and angels, if he is ever to return to the London that he knew.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Vivid, imaginative.

  • By Joseph on 10-29-09

Thought I'd love it, but only liked it.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

For me, Gaiman's best is still "Coraline". Yeah it's a kid's book. It's still my favorite thing he's written.

After that come American Gods, Anansi Boys, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and several others, before this book.

I expected to love this. I guess I thought it was supposed to be Neil Gaiman's best book -- his sort of trademark work. To me though, it felt too light and shallow. I guess things like American Gods and Anansi Boys had me expecting something really deep and mind-bending. This was not that.

  • Andrea Vernon and the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection

  • By: Alexander C. Kane
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,117
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,892
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,885

Andrea Vernon always thought she would spend her life living in Paris writing thought-provoking historical novels all day and sipping wine on the Seine all night. But the reality is she's drowning in debt, has no prospects, and is forced to move back to Queens, where her parents remind her daily that they are very interested in grandchildren. Then, one morning, she is kidnapped, interviewed, and hired as an administrative assistant by the Corporation for UltraHuman Protection. Superheroes for hire, using their powers for good. What could possibly go wrong?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Normal Life in an Abnormal World

  • By Arthur D. Rich on 08-26-17

Funny, kept me listening, but drags on a bit

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

This is a book that really only has one joke that it keeps telling over and over.

The joke is that superheroes, as employees of a large bureaucratic corporation, have to fill out time sheets, attend sexual harassment training, and worry about annual reviews in between saving Earth from evil supervillains.

The thing is, it's actually pretty funny and there are several directions from which to approach the joke, and the author does this pretty well. It kept me listening to the end, but I wouldn't have minded if it had been two or three chapters shorter.

There were a few laugh-out-loud moments which were great. But there are a few complaints I had. Things that, if changed, would have made the story significantly better. For one thing, the superhero names were just too silly. I guess she had to steer clear of any copyrighted names, but the names she came up with were over-the-top silly. Second, there's never any real tension. It's too light and fluffy, I guess.

My recommendation is this: if you want sci-fi comedy (and have already read Hitchhiker's Guide, of course), then you might go with books by David Wong ("This Book is Full of Spiders"), John Scalzi ("Redshirts") or Dennis Taylor ("We Are Legion"). If you've read all those, you'll probably also enjoy this.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Whale Rider

  • By: Witi Ihimaera
  • Narrated by: Jay Laga'aia
  • Length: 3 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100

The classic book that inspired the award-winning, internationally released film Whale Rider, winner of Best Film at the 2003 Sundance Film Festival and 2004 Academy Awards Best Actress nomination for Keisha Castle-Hughes. Eight-year-old Kahu craves her great-grandfather's love and attention. But he's focused in his duties as Chief, in a tribe that claims decent from the legendary "whale rider".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Kahu, her great-grandfather, and the whale rider

  • By Will on 07-12-05

Not as good as the movie, surprisingly.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-30-18

This is one of the exceedingly rare cases where the book is not as good as the movie.

If you've not seen the movie "Whale Rider" don't bother reading this until you've seen it. The movie is great and really tells the story perfectly. You'll want to experience it first that way.

For fans of the movie, like me, the most interesting thing about this book is how it differs from the movie. It does differ from the movie in some fundamental ways. In fact, I got the distinct impression that the aspects of the movie that made it as good as it was must have come mainly from Niki Caro's vision, rather than Witi Ihimaera. That's not to say Ihimaera didn't have the seminal idea and a good story to tell, but it seems that Caro saw the real potential here. It's almost as if the movie and the book have different agendas -- different points to make about the world, people in general, the human condition, life, etc.

So even though I wasn't crazy about the book, I recommend it highly for fans of the movie so that you can evaluate the significance of how they differ. It may lead to an even greater appreciation for the movie.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Norse Mythology

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42,907
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 39,260
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,084

Neil Gaiman has long been inspired by ancient mythology in creating the fantastical realms of his fiction. Now he turns his attention back to the source, presenting a bravura rendition of the great northern tales. In Norse Mythology, Gaiman fashions primeval stories into a novelistic arc that begins with the genesis of the legendary nine worlds; delves into the exploits of the deities, dwarves, and giants; and culminates in Ragnarok, the twilight of the gods and the rebirth of a new time and people.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As good as it gets without the old texts

  • By William Taylor on 05-10-18

Interesting, fun, but forgettable

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

Not Neil Gaiman's best by a long shot.

The problem with these stories is..., well, there's zero tension, zero reason to care about the characters. It's interesting to think that these are the stories ancient Norsemen told each other, but then Neil makes it clear in the preface that he's giving his own spin to them, so I'm not sure what was authentic and what was Neil's contribution.

If you're a big fan of Neil Gaiman, of course you'll want to listen to this. But if your not, don't bother. Get American Gods or Anansi Boys, or any of his other novels, which are far superior to this.

  • Lion

  • By: Saroo Brierley, Larry Buttrose
  • Narrated by: Vikas Adam
  • Length: 7 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,750
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,598
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,597

At only five years old, Saroo Brierley got lost on a train in India. Unable to read or write or recall the name of his hometown or even his own last name, he survived alone for weeks on the rough streets of Calcutta before ultimately being transferred to an agency and adopted by a couple in Australia. Despite his gratitude, Brierley always wondered about his origins. Eventually, with the advent of Google Earth, he had the opportunity to look for the needle in a haystack he once called home.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Astonishing True Story

  • By Gretchen SLP on 01-21-17

Great book, rare case where movie is better

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-18

I saw the movie they made from this first, and it hit me very hard. I was moved to tears, which is rare for me.

This book is also great, but I didn't feel that it was as powerful as the movie. Maybe because I saw the movie first? I don't know.

I would highly recommend this book, but I'd recommend seeing the movie even more.

  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

  • By: Mark Twain
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,946
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,733
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,734

With his trademark mirth and boundless charisma, actor Nick Offerman brought the loveable shenanigans of Twain's adolescent hero to life in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Now, in yet another virtuosic performance, the actor proves that despite being separated by a span of over a century, his connection to the author and his work is undeniable and that theirs is a timeless collaboration that should not be missed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mark Twain and Nick Offerman are a perfect match

  • By Philip M. Chute on 10-23-17

It's Mark Twain, so it's great, but drags a bit

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-18

Mark Twain can do more with a single paragraph than many authors can do with a whole book. This is Mark Twain, so of course it's going to be great, but I felt it went a little long, and dragged in the middle. Also I didn't feel that the resolution of the story was up to the rest. Not bad, just a bit of a fizzle, rather than the bang the reader expects.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The One Memory of Flora Banks

  • By: Emily Barr
  • Narrated by: Nicola Barber
  • Length: 8 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 37

Seventeen-year-old Flora Banks has no short-term memory. Her mind resets itself several times a day and has since the age of 10, when the tumor that was removed from Flora's brain took with it her ability to make new memories. That is, until she kisses Drake, her best friend's boyfriend, the night before he leaves town. Miraculously, this one memory breaks through Flora's fractured mind and sticks. Flora is convinced that Drake is responsible for restoring her memory and making her whole again.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Heart eyes emoji

  • By rachel on 12-09-17

Great story with a few disappointing parts

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-18-18

This is a great book. I was riveted through most of it. Large parts of it are un-put-downable.
However, there is one scene -- a very important scene, critical to the story -- that is just ... well, I was unable to suspend disbelief.
Without giving anything like spoilers, it involves a person using the internet. What it revealed, I feel, is a lack of understanding by the author of how technology she described works.
Because of that scene, mainly, I knocked 1 star off. If that could have been modified slightly (making no significant change to the story), or at least explained better, I would have given this 5 stars.

  • Science in the Soul

  • Selected Writings of a Passionate Rationalist
  • By: Richard Dawkins
  • Narrated by: Richard Dawkins, Lalla Ward, Gillian Somerscales
  • Length: 14 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 446
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 415
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 413

For decades Richard Dawkins has been the world's most brilliant scientific communicator, consistently illuminating the wonders of nature and attacking faulty logic. Science in the Soul brings together 42 essays, polemics, and paeans - culled from personal papers, newspapers, lectures, and online salons - all written with Dawkins' characteristic erudition, remorseless wit, and unjaded awe of the natural world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wide in scope - an engaging view into Dawkins

  • By Dennis A Robinson on 08-10-17

Not Dawkins' best by far

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-03-18

My recommendation would be that you read just about anything by Richard Dawkins before reading this.

There are a few interesting bits scattered here and there, but it's mostly really dull.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful