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SCOTT

Ypsilanti, Michigan, United States
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  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 6
  • ratings
  • Dragongirl

  • Anne McCaffrey's Dragonriders of Pern
  • By: Todd McCaffrey
  • Narrated by: Emily Durante
  • Length: 16 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 340
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 261
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 265

Young Fiona, rider of the gold queen Talenth, has returned from the past, where she and a group of dragons and riders fled so that the wounded could heal from their previous battles. Gone only three days, yet aged more than three years, Fiona is no longer a child but a woman prepared to fight against the Thread that threatens to destroy her world.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • "Stuck in Time with No Conclusion"

  • By HZ on 08-10-10

Wow, what a drawn-out mess!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-01-17

Todd's writing style and taste for Pern seemed to be showing improvement after Dragonsblood and lost some of the endless depressing morbidity of the first and second plagues only to have it all regurgitated again and left to fester in Dragongirl.
Repetitive, depressing, trite, inane to the point of monotonous annoyance. The story seemed to start out well enough then stalled somewhere about chapter 8 and degraded into something resembling the diary of a moody teenage girl for the next 15 or so chapters, not going anywhere, redundantly having bad things happen or people worrying about bad things happen, people doing nothing about bad things happening other than sleeping with ever new partners and whining incessantly.
The whole thing was made worse in that the narrator apparently didn't bother to read any of the previous novels or listen to any of the prior narrators. Most of the names were pronounced differently to the point of distraction and even the name of HNO3 was hacked into Egg-enn-o-three. Seriously?!?! How long would it take to call the author to ask for clarification on how to pronounce a word or spend a few hours listening to prior narrators?

As mentioned, the middle 15 or so chapters sludge along relentlessly with redundant nothings about as interesting as the common 9th grader's meanderings. "I'm so special, I'm so sad. I used to chase tunnel snakes. I love you. You love me. We all love each other. We all make mistakes. So many dragons are dying. Pern is doomed. We apparently timed it. We need to do something. But let's just sit around and wine and exchange sexual partners and re-arrange weyrs and hug each other and discuss how sad we all are and how doomed the world is over and over and do nothing"

Then it hits the last chapter and Lorana starts running around obsessed with Weyr dust and only in the Epilogue do you get slapped with an information dump as complicated as a mound of linguini mixed with knotted old shoe laces and tangled christmas tree lights attempting to explain what happened.

I've been told that Dragon's time, while still depressing and complicated with endless timing is a slight improvement that improves further in Sky, plus I already purchased Time, so I'll trudge on, but if you dare try to read this one - take my advice.... around about chapter 10 or so if you get as frustrated and bored as I was, just jump ahead to chapter 23 or so knowing a lot of people die, a lot of people sleep around, a lot of people piss moan and whine and that's about all that you missed.

  • Dragon's Fire

  • Dragonriders of Pern
  • By: Anne McCaffrey, Todd McCaffrey
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 11 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 341
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264

Pellar is an orphan taken in by Masterharper Zist. Though born mute, Pellar is a gifted tracker, and when Zist sets off to take over as harper for Natalon's coal-mining camp, Pellar - along with his fire-lizard, Chitter - joins him on a secret mission of his own: to find out if reported thefts of coal are the work of the Shunned, criminals condemned to a life of wandering and hardship.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glad this story is going on

  • By Krickett Crawford on 05-01-14

Not bad, not great

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-17

I'm still reading my way through Todd's contributions to his mother's stories. The first he seemed to do mostly himself (after Kin) was a disappointment, but this one improves a bit on that rough first effort.
There is some awkwardness in what I would consider to be non-sufficiently explained 'mystery' new dragon stone that explodes and the sudden addition of 'booms' as dragons go and come from between. While the latter may seem to make sense, the utter lack of 'booms' in the prior 18 books makes it a touch burdensome. Then we throw on top of it that somehow all of Pern manages to somehow forget what dragons chew to make fire? (which becomes the premise of this entire book)
This one at least moves around a bit more than some of the other books that mire down in one or two locations, but the moving becomes so much that it then become hard to follow for the constant hopping from place to place, characters to characters (too many) and again still minces in too much sadistic torture porn where main characters seem to constantly be suffering or are depressed or sick or heartbroken. What is it with modern writers like Todd and others like Hugh Howey? It's almost like they look up to Ernie Hemingway and think it makes for a good story to just screw with everyone in the story all the time and kill or otherwise torture as many main characters as possible!
(the bad news is, it gets worse in later books in the series - multiple plagues, wyer wide disasters, problems with clutches, high thread casualties - stop! Just stop! Eghad, not every single moment has to be a depressing series of near impossibly depressing trials)
At least he attempts somewhat to explain the firestone confusion (while not sufficiently explaining how it got confused in the first place) but it's overall just awkward.

  • Dragon Harper

  • Dragonriders of Pern
  • By: Anne McCaffrey, Todd McCaffrey
  • Narrated by: Susan Ericksen
  • Length: 10 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 397
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 295
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 302

Life in the Harper Hall is busy for best friends Kindan, Nonala, and Kelsa. As the only female apprentices, Nonala and Kelsa are the butt of jokes and easy targets for the bully Vaxoram and his cronies. But when Kindan springs to Kelsa's defense, he winds up in a fight for his life against the older, bigger Vaxoram - a fight that will lead to a surprising friendship. Then fate intervenes in the form of a virulent plague as fast-spreading as it is deadly.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Mixed feelings

  • By SCOTT on 11-30-17

Mixed feelings

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-30-17

What disappointed you about Dragon Harper?

In all of the Todd M. books thus far there are too many extraneous characters with similar names too follow in too few places. And way way way too much torture porn. Another plague? Seriously? Sure, readers just love to have all of the main characters either dying or have everyone they care about dying. What great entertainment! Not!!!
It's understandable that every once in a while a sorrowful story is required to be realistic - Moreta's story for example from his Mother's books. But it seems that every book that Todd wrote after his mother passed is depressing as all get out. It's starting to make me wonder if maybe he wasn't resentful about his mother's creation and now is intent on tearing it apart bit by bit with nothing but a bunch of morbid events one after another.

What could Anne McCaffrey and Todd McCaffrey have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Less misery and suffering. Focus more on main characters, show more than just a handful of locations. When Anne used to incorporate multiple characters, they were central to specific themes and locations spread all across Pern. Virtually all of this book takes place in first the Harper Hall then later in Fort Hold. Names come and go as people are just dying one after another. This isn't entertainment. It's just sadism.

Which scene was your favorite?

There were some shining moments. He managed to pick up on some of the emotions and uplifting scenes that his mother would have such as Kindan's 10 reasons to live and the readjustmant of Vaxorrum.

You didn’t love this book... but did it have any redeeming qualities?

As mentioned, there were a few emotional scenes that were well depicted, but way too few that were uplifting. Most of them just plain depressing. And as if that is not bad enough, it seems to continue from similar morbidity in the prior book and carries on in the following books that start by re-living still other people's suffering in the same time frame then go on with still more suffering.
Is Todd just a flaming nihilist? WTH?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How I Got This Way

  • By: Patrick McManus
  • Narrated by: Norman Dietz
  • Length: 7 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 193
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161

Grab your fishing net and hold onto your funny-bone; you're in for a hilarious romp through the woods with best-selling funnyman Patrick McManus. How I Got This Way is a rib-tickling collection of stories about the outdoors guaranteed to leave you chuckling. Join McManus and his pals on a venture into the Idaho wilderness that includes taking a hike with - ahem - the president of the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mark Twain meets Bertie Wooster

  • By Snoodely on 07-22-12

Good ole McManus, will leave you in stitches

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-16-12

Would you consider the audio edition of How I Got This Way to be better than the print version?

The present day Mark Twain for the modern sportsman, McManus's self-deprecating approach to humor is something that almost any outdoors person can relate to. With the help of great narration to bring the stories to life, you will no doubt reflect upon your own hunting experiences and tribulations both in the field and out.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Rancid will always hold a special place in my heart.

Have you listened to any of Norman Dietz’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I've heard a couple of different narrators of McManus stories, and short of having the author read them himself, Dietz's readings are by far the best in my opinion.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

McManus always makes me laugh.