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Jessica Lucero

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  • helpful vote
  • 13
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  • Britt-Marie Was Here

  • A Novel
  • By: Fredrik Backman
  • Narrated by: Joan Walker
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,353
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,796
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,783

Britt-Marie can't stand mess. She eats dinner at precisely the right time and starts her day at six in the morning because only lunatics wake up later than that. And she is not passive-aggressive. Not in the least. It's just that sometimes people interpret her helpful suggestions as criticisms, which is certainly not her intention. But at 63, Britt-Marie has had enough. She finally walks out on her loveless 40-year marriage and finds a job in the only place she can: Borg, a small, derelict town devastated by the financial crisis.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ha! (Listen to the book and you will understand!)

  • By Jodie on 07-22-16

Britt-Marie and the lessons of connecting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-18

I loved A Man Called Ove, and I loved Britt-Marie was Here. Backman tells the stories of an often missed population: our elders. I read these stories as reminders to show respect to one another and to really take the time see one another.

  • The Rise and Fall of D.O.D.O.

  • A Novel
  • By: Neal Stephenson, Nicole Galland
  • Narrated by: Laurence Bouvard, Shelley Atkinson, Laural Merlington, and others
  • Length: 24 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,612
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,130
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,115

From best-selling author Neal Stephenson and critically acclaimed historical and contemporary commercial novelist Nicole Galland comes a captivating and complex near-future thriller combining history, science, magic, mystery, intrigue, and adventure that questions the very foundations of the modern world.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Exceptional voice cast, unconventional format

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-03-17

Fun and engaging read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

I enjoyed the book and the philosophical debate about history , technological development, and the making (and unmaking) of it. I wish more time would have been spent with the debate at the end of the story versus the time spent on telling how we get to that debate. In the end, though, a thoroughly enjoyable read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dream Hoarders

  • How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do About It
  • By: Richard V. Reeves
  • Narrated by: Richard V. Reeves
  • Length: 4 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 107

As Reeves shows, the growing separation between the upper middle class and everyone else can be seen in family structure, neighborhoods, attitudes, and lifestyle. Those at the top of the income ladder are becoming more effective at passing on their status to their children, reducing overall social mobility. The result is not just an economic divide but a fracturing of American society along class lines. Upper-middle-class children become upper-middle-class adults.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If You Have a Grad Degree You Need To Read This!

  • By David Larson on 10-06-17

Truth!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-18

I would qualify as the upper middle class based on my household income, though I certainly never thought about myself this way. Reading this book has helped me to see my own privilege a different light and has made me aware of the things I want to hang on to (certain tax breaks and seeing my property value keep rising) and how that self-interest keeps opportunities away from others who are less fortunate. I hope that more people read this book and that a new movement emerges-- one in which we in the upper middle class become more self-reflective and that this awareness leads to real efforts to find better ways to share opportunities, even if it means giving some things up.