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Snowbirdj

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  • 4
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  • Nomadland

  • Surviving America in the Twenty-First Century
  • By: Jessica Bruder
  • Narrated by: Karen White
  • Length: 9 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,104
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,003
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,003

From the beet fields of North Dakota to the wilderness campgrounds of California to an Amazon warehouse in Texas, people who once might have kicked back to enjoy their sunset years are hard at work. Underwater on mortgages or finding that Social Security comes up short, they're hitting the road in astonishing numbers, forming a new community of nomads: RV and van-dwelling migrant laborers, or "workampers".

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Powerful And Disturbing

  • By Sara on 06-14-18

The Tale of Two Americas

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-17

This was a frightening view of what America has become and where it's headed. Jessica Bruder embedded within this 'hidden in plain sight community' shows the humanity they find by coming together, the fears they live with, as well as the indignities they suffer. She also reveals the America that profits from thier labor and the America that refuses to see them and recognize it's obligation to them.
I am shaken to my core after listening to this book. There should be something that I can do, but I can't think of it. I am more mindful of this population now and I will try to SEE them and offer them what I can if nothing but a kind word. I will also look at my City's and my County's zoning ordinances and begin to work to carve a place out for them.
jc

38 of 46 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133,230
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,662
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,538

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Psychological Thriller Mystery

  • By Victor @ theAudiobookBlog on 01-23-18

It held my interest

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-20-16

The story was a bit confusing but the narrators were very good. It was ok.

Kitchen Privileges
    Memoirs of a Bronx Girlhood
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Mary Higgins Clark
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Mary Higgins Clark
    
    


    
    Length: 5 hrs and 23 mins
    18 ratings
    Overall 4.6
  • Kitchen Privileges

  • Memoirs of a Bronx Girlhood
  • By: Mary Higgins Clark
  • Narrated by: Mary Higgins Clark
  • Length: 5 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

Even as a young girl, growing up in the Bronx, Mary Higgins Clark knew she wanted to be a writer. The gift of storytelling was a part of her Irish ancestry, so it followed naturally that she would later use her sharp eye, keen intelligence, and inquisitive nature to create stories. Along with all Americans, citizens of the Bronx suffered during the Depression. So when Mary's father died, her mother opened the family home to boarders and placed a discreet sign next to the front door that read, "Furnished Rooms. Kitchen Privileges."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My Favorite Memoir!

  • By Snowbirdj on 11-04-16

My Favorite Memoir!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-16

This is my third time reading this book, and I still heard new things and couldn't stop. I laughed out loud when she describes her sex education lesson with the Nuns. I became teary-eyed at other times. This is such a good read. I hate that I'm finished.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful