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Angie Golish

Salt Lake City, UT
  • 33
  • reviews
  • 37
  • helpful votes
  • 35
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  • Broken Angels

  • By: Gemma Liviero
  • Narrated by: Nico Evers-Swindell, Emily Foster
  • Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,675
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,514
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,509

Imprisoned in the Lodz Ghetto, Elsi discovers her mother's desperate attempt to end her pregnancy and comes face-to-face with the impossibility of their situation. Risking her own life, Elsi joins a resistance group to sabotage the regime. Blonde, blue-eyed Matilda is wrenched from her family in Romania and taken to Germany, where her captors attempt to mold her into the perfect Aryan child. Spirited and brave, she must inspire hope in the other stolen children to make her dreams of escape a reality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • loved this book.

  • By James R Terry, II on 05-17-16

Fascinating and Heartbreaking

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

This book was a fascinating historical fiction set during the time of the Holocaust. It successfully wove together the storylines and lives of three very different characters during this time of tragedy and death; a Nazi doctor, a Jewish girl from the ghetto, and a young half -german half-gypsy girl who was kidnapped from her family and sent to one of the infamous reform schools where the Nazi party tried to educate children on being "more german."

As the story comes together, you witness the change in each of these characters as they not only adjust to their circumstances but transform in order to rise above and fight against the regime being enforced upon them. They each deal with heartache, love, and finding themselves again during this terrible time, and some even find a small amount of redemption in it.

Wonderfully written, this book completely sucks you into a time when it was nearly nothing but heartache and surrounds you in a story that is rich with possibility in a time where there was little hope. I also really enjoyed the author's ability to wrap up many loose ends without it feeling forced or false.

  • A Discovery of Witches

  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 24 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,655
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,231
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,278

Deep in the stacks of Oxford's Bodleian Library, young scholar Diana Bishop unwittingly calls up a bewitched alchemical manuscript in the course of her research. Descended from an old and distinguished line of witches, Diana wants nothing to do with sorcery; so after a furtive glance and a few notes, she banishes the book to the stacks. But her discovery sets a fantastical underworld stirring, and a horde of daemons, witches, and vampires soon descends upon the library.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A most terrific & non-typical treatment of Witches

  • By Neal on 04-17-14

Not What I Expected, But Still Hooked!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

I think I was expecting something more high-brow with this book than what I got, and perhaps I should have read the part of the synopsis which compared this book to that of Anne Rice (or Harry Potter on other sites) and said "but with a side of Twilight" or "with the sensuality of Twilight." Then I would have been better prepared for it I think... (I do not care for Twilight)

However, that being said, I really did enjoy this book and Deborah Harkness had me thoroughly hooked into the story. While I can see the touches of Anne Rice (faintly) and a grown-up version of Harry Potter (actually, strongly and welcome in my opinion), I feel like this book provides a unique take on the magical world and an interesting view of different creatures (though it only calls out three in particular: Demons, Vampires, and Witches. It could have expanded to so many more...) and it bridges a really wonderful link between the magical world as we can imagine it and the real world by involving actual history and science.

All in all, I found it a very intriguing story (and series altogether) with rich characters and many fun adventures and plot twists. I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys magical realism with a touch of romance.

  • Shadow of Night

  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 24 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,260
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,865
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,861

Now, picking up from A Discovery of Witches' cliff-hanger ending, Shadow of Night plunges Diana Bishop and Matthew Clairmont into Elizabethan London, a world of spies, subterfuge, and a coterie of Matthew's old friends, the mysterious School of Night that includes Christopher Marlowe and Walter Raleigh. Here, Diana must locate a witch to tutor her in magic, Matthew is forced to confront a past he thought he had put to rest, and the mystery of Ashmole 782 deepens. Deborah Harkness has crafted a gripping journey through a world of alchemy, time travel, and magical discoveries.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Recommended, however....

  • By J. Lunsford on 07-15-12

A Fun Continuation-Set in the Past

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

This was a very fun continuation of the story that started in book one, A Discovery of Witches, and took place largely in the past which I loved. I'm a big fan of historical fiction and Deborah Harkness' second book in her All Souls Trilogy was immersed in historical fiction that was wrapped in researched accuracy. It was fun to follow big names of Elizabethan times, such as Walter Rawley and Christopher Marlowe (even if he is a total D-bag) and hear how it was lived not only once, but twice by our main Vampire love interest Matthew deClairemont.

A very fun follow-up and continuation of the story I first fell in love with and can't wait to see continue in the next book.

  • The Book of Life

  • All Souls, Book 3
  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 23 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,249
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,239
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,201

After traveling through time in Shadow of Night, the second book in Deborah Harkness's enchanting series, historian and witch Diana Bishop and vampire scientist Matthew Clairmont return to the present to face new crises and old enemies. At Matthew's ancestral home at Sept-Tours, they reunite with the cast of characters from A Discovery of Witches - with one significant exception. But the real threat to their future has yet to be revealed, and when it is, the search for Ashmole 782 and its missing pages takes on even more urgency.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Trilogy!

  • By Cheri on 12-13-15

I Want More

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

If I'm being honest, while I still enjoyed reading/listening (audio books are my jam) to The Book of Life for the simple reason that I fell in love with the characters in the last two books, this third and final book in the All Souls Trilogy was my least favorite of the three for a few different reasons.

***Spoilers***

First, Diana lost a little bit of her edge. It was the author's intention to make her even more of a warrior in this book, which you could tell from repeated interactions and where the book finally ends up, but so much of Diana gets lost in this storyline of her finding her happily ever after as a wife/mother. Don't get me wrong, wives/mothers are warriors and I love all of that, but I feel like after so much time Diana spent not even expecting or worrying about love/family/kids (which is even brought up by her best friend Chris who is shocked to find her in that situation as well) she just seems to immediately fall into this different personality where it seems to be everything she's ever dreamed of.

It's almost like she has two personalities, and you see her warring with the fact that to embrace her magic she has to possibly give up her scholarly pursuits and career-but on the other hand this other side of her is totally okay suddenly becoming a wife/mother/consort to a vampire (which she's repeatedly warned is a full-time domestic gig). I feel like this became all encompassing, but having never been a wife nor mother, perhaps that is just what happens? I don't know, it felt odd the way it was shown out.

That being said, I do have to say that the interactions between the family in this book felt so very genuine and full of love. The entire birthing scene (which felt like maybe the longest scene in the whole book?) was written very well, and walked us through just how each of the characters must have been feeling and made me feel very much like I could sympathize with Diana during that moment... You could feel her fear, pain, and all the overwhelming love and I really enjoyed how well my emotions were pulled into the situation.

But then, I feel like after the babies were born we lost that emotion... It spent a lot of time talking about how it felt to have them and the first few days as a mother, but it also felt too cold and cavaliere when Diana was able to just pass them off to others without a second though. Or how she was able to leave (even though she had to) and it didn't touch on her feelings as a mother while she was away from her infant children in Venice?

I feel like the book, or Diana's character, couldnt decide who it wanted to be or how it wanted to feel for a good part of this and kept going back and forth between extreme emotion and nearly no emotion...

Second: There was SO much wrapped up in this book that some of the events almost seemed rushed... There's all of this build up to the main battle and then it's kind of just... Done? It felt rushed a little...

Third: The fact that this book introduced all kinds of new events, issues, paths, etc. and then ended as the third and final chapter of the series was disappointing. Yes, she got her "happy ending" and everything seemed great and all wrapped up at the end with her balancing her family, career, and new calling in the Congregation-but what? Again, rushed.

I feel like I'm left with all of these questions... What happens with the warnings that Philip's ghost provided that there would still be rough patches? What happens with the babies and their strange abilities? What happens with Phoebe becoming a vampire? Do they ever see Emily and Rebecca's ghosts too? Does anyone else ever see Philip's ghosts? And what about the whole concept that is only briefly mentioned in a conversation between the two ghosts that indicates people can only see ghosts if they've "gotten over" someone's death and moved on? Can we explore that more?

So I guess, my main complaint with the book is that I wanted more and didn't get it... Which can be considered a good thing for the author in some ways... We love your work Deborah Harkness, but I think you're missing out on a fantastic opportunity to continue the storyline for your die-hard fans of this series... I mean look at how far Charlaine Harris was able to take her Sookie Stackhouse series (maybe too far in that case haha) or how far Anne Rice got out of her Vampire Chronicles? We want more? Who wants in on the petition?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Beast's Garden

  • By: Kate Forsyth
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Vuletic
  • Length: 16 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 363
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 360

Ava fell in love the night the Nazis first showed their true nature to the world. A retelling of the Grimms' Beauty and the Beast, set in Nazi Germany. It's August 1939 in Germany, and Ava's world is in turmoil. To save her father, she must marry a young Nazi officer, Leo von Löwenstein, who works for Hitler's spy chief in Berlin. However, she hates and fears the brutal Nazi regime and finds herself compelled to stand against it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent story and beautifully narrated

  • By kestergayle on 12-06-15

Amazing Historical Fiction Set in Nazi Germany

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

This book was fantastic. It's a twist on one of the original fairy-tales that Beauty and the Beast is based off of, and it's set in Berlin during World War 2. The book covers so much of a time in Germany when so much was so wrong, and one girls fight as she lives a double life fighting the Nazi regime and falling in love with the German Officer she was forced to marry in order to save herself and her family.

This book is filled with so much emotional, historical relevance, and deep deep thought. What would I do in that situation? How terrifying, and how much we can learn from even fictional characters about who we are, and a what we must prevent from ever happening again.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Paying Guests

  • By: Sarah Waters
  • Narrated by: Juliet Stevenson
  • Length: 21 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,415
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,179
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2,188

It is 1922, and London is tense. Ex-servicemen are disillusioned; the out-of-work and the hungry are demanding change. And in South London, in a genteel Camberwell villa, a large silent house now bereft of brothers, husband, and even servants, life is about to be transformed, as impoverished widow Mrs. Wray and her spinster daughter, Frances, are obliged to take in lodgers.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Tedious

  • By Loretta R. Cooper on 10-14-14

A Bit Slow At First, but Super Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

This book starts a bit slow, but it's actually quite fascinating as I've never looked into this type of relationship during this time period. Throw in a bit of murder-mystery-escapades, and you have a pretty interesting tale!

  • Mariana

  • By: Susanna Kearsley
  • Narrated by: Carolyn Bonnyman
  • Length: 11 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,225
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,125
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,119

Juliet Beckett believes in destiny. When she moves into Greywethers, a beautiful 16th-century farmhouse, she suspects that more than coincidence has brought her there. The locals are warm and welcoming; especially the eligible squire of Crofton Hall, yet beneath the ordinaries, Julia senses a haunting sadness about her new home. Then she learns of Mariana, a beautiful young woman who lived there 300 years ago. It seems history has been waiting for Julia...

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I was hooked when I heard the Narrator's voice!

  • By Ray on 02-23-12

Lovely!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

I really enjoy Susanna Kearsley's work, and Mariana is no exception to that rule. The book premise seemed a little less like something I wanted to read, but once I started it I was quickly pulled into the rich history of the cozy little Greyweather's Cottage and both time periods it inhabited prominently.

The book is filled with great historical fiction, lots of information about the region/countryside it is set in, and characters who are deep and well thought-out. There's also a touch of romance, but without anything too smutty or cheaply done. It feels graceful, and heartwarming.

  • The Physick Book of Deliverance Dane

  • By: Katherine Howe
  • Narrated by: Katherine Kellgren
  • Length: 12 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,495
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 810
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 820

Connie's mother asks her to sell an abandoned house once owned by her grandmother in Salem, Mass. Relunctantly, Connie moves to the small town and inhabits the crumbling, ancient house, trying to restore it to a semblance of order. Curious things start to happen when Connie finds the name "Deliverance Dane" on a yellowed scrap of paper and begins to have visions of a long ago woman condemned for practicing "physick," or herbal healing, on her neighbors in 1690s Salem.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love it!

  • By Darinda on 06-20-09

The Best Book I Read This Year!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

This book was probably one of the best books, if not the best book, I read all year. I LOVED everything about it, from the rich history in the lives of those living during the Salem Witch Trials, to the historical relevance that was imparted on those living today. It was educational, entertaining, and so enthralling! I'd recommend it for anyone who loves magical realism, historical fiction, mystery and plot twists, and learning a little something from their entertainment.

  • Bitter Greens

  • By: Kate Forsyth
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 19 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 127
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 117

Charlotte-Rose has been banished from the court of Versailles by the Sun King, Louis XIV, after a series of scandalous love affairs. She is comforted by an old nun, Sister Seraphina, who tells her the tale of a young girl who, 100 years earlier, was sold by her parents for a handful of bitter greens. After Margherita's father steals from the walled garden of the courtesan Selena Leonelli, he is threatened with having both hands cut off unless he and his wife give away their little girl.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Rich, Dark and Fascinating

  • By Ilana on 01-08-15

AMAZING.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

I LOVED Bitter Greens, and it was easily a favorite this year. Kate Forsyth re-tells the story of Rapunzel in a richly historical way that both follows the fairy tale and elaborates on it. This book is filled with mystery, ties to the past, and lore so rich it both feeds your nostalgia for the tales of youth and sucks in your inner adult. Such a fantastic read!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • One True Loves

  • By: Taylor Jenkins Reid
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,038
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,878
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,881

In her 20s Emma Blair marries her high school sweetheart, Jesse. They build a life for themselves, far away from the expectations of their parents and the people of their hometown. They travel the world together, living life to the fullest. On their first wedding anniversary, Jesse is on a helicopter over the Pacific when it goes missing. Just like that, Jesse is gone forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My new favorite author!

  • By Kim on 06-12-16

This Sucks You In Emotionally

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-16

I very quickly became completely emotionally sucked into this story. The story follows someone who grieves the loss of her husband, a man she has loved for the majority of her life, and how when she finally moves on and falls in love with someone else-she finds out he isn't dead and has to deal with a whole slew of emotional decisions and complications.

Even though most of us can't say that this has ever happened to us before, there is on some level a lot we can relate to. As someone who has loved more than one person in my life, and worried about "the one who got away" causing disruption in a new love were they to come back, there was a lot of her inner turmoil that resonated. This book was well-written without being too "fluffy" and it portrayed her emotions in a realistic and relatable way. Ultimately, it was one of my favorite reads this year.