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John

Nebraska
  • 12
  • reviews
  • 29
  • helpful votes
  • 123
  • ratings
  • Skin in the Game

  • Hidden Asymmetries in Daily Life
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,941
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,570
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,549

In his most provocative and practical book yet, one of the foremost thinkers of our time redefines what it means to understand the world, succeed in a profession, contribute to a fair and just society, detect nonsense, and influence others. Citing examples ranging from Hammurabi to Seneca, Antaeus the Giant to Donald Trump, Nassim Nicholas Taleb shows how the willingness to accept one's own risks is an essential attribute of heroes, saints, and flourishing people in all walks of life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliance smothered by Condescension and Petty Squabbling

  • By Jeremy on 03-11-18

feisty author with specific strong views

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-18

Nice read and insights, distinctive views. Delve deep into statistics in a non mathematical way throughout.

  • The Square and the Tower

  • Networks and Power, from the Freemasons to Facebook
  • By: Niall Ferguson
  • Narrated by: Elliot Hill
  • Length: 17 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 622
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 548
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 545

Most history is hierarchical: it's about emperors, presidents, prime ministers, and field marshals. It's about states, armies, and corporations. It's about orders from on high. Even history "from below" is often about trade unions and workers' parties. But what if that's simply because hierarchical institutions create the archives that historians rely on? What if we are missing the informal, less well documented social networks that are the true sources of power and drivers of change?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Power? Does it come from hierarchies or networks?

  • By Ted on 04-25-18

Meandering

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-18

Left me searching for a broad conclusions about the meaning and grand way to address networks in society. Yet this never really happened.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Sentient Machine

  • The Coming Age of Artificial Intelligence
  • By: Amir Husain
  • Narrated by: Simon Jones
  • Length: 5 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 144

The future is now. Artificial "machine" intelligence is playing an ever-greater role in our society. We are already using cruise control in our cars and automatic checkout at the drugstore and are unable to live without our smartphones. The discussion around AI is largely polarized; people think either machines will solve all problems for everyone or they will lead us down a dark, dystopian path into total human irrelevance. Regardless of what you believe, the idea that we might bring forth intelligent creation can be intrinsically frightening.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting take on Artificial Intelligence

  • By Philomath on 11-21-17

AI optimist

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-24-17

Interesting take on the security and societal of AI. Not the typical doom and gloom of AIs rise.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • WTF?

  • What's the Future and Why It's Up to Us
  • By: Tim O'Reilly
  • Narrated by: Fred Sanders
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 587
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 522
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 520

The digital revolution has transformed the world of media, upending centuries-old companies and business models. Now, it is restructuring every business, every job, and every sector of society. Yet the biggest changes are still ahead. To survive, every industry and organization will have to transform itself in multiple ways. O'Reilly explores what the next economy will mean for the world and every aspect of our lives - and what we can do to shape it.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A glimpse into the present (not the future)

  • By Brian Kennan on 01-01-18

Nice insights

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-17

Several interesting insights, but driven heavily by a Silicon Valley view of the world. This view will not please everyone.

  • The Amazon Way on IoT

  • 10 Principles for Every Leader from the World's Leading Internet of Things Strategies
  • By: John Rossman
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 5 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 132

The Amazon Way on IoT is for the leader who wants to understand how the Internet of things is transforming business and society. Listeners will discover business cases, key concepts, technologies and tools to help develop, explain and execute their own IoT approach through understanding Amazon's and other leading companies sophisticated IoT technologies and strategies.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Very insightful, but quite boring

  • By Riaan on 02-21-17

Packed with solid insights for IOT experts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-17

Good book, with many solid insights for those interested in becoming an expert in IOT (at a systems / solution level).

  • Modern Romance

  • An Investigation
  • By: Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg
  • Narrated by: Aziz Ansari, Eric Klinenberg
  • Length: 6 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,091
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,794
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,582

At some point every one of us embarks on a journey to find love. We meet people, date, get into and out of relationships, all with the hope of finding someone with whom we share a deep connection. This seems standard now, but it's wildly different from what people did even just decades ago. Single people today have more romantic options than at any point in human history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Entertaining and informative

  • By ty on 08-23-15

stupid book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-16

First book I have seen which criticize audio book listeners as lazy. It lacks any value and is not funny.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Makers

  • The New Industrial Revolution
  • By: Chris Anderson
  • Narrated by: René Ruiz
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 497
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 504

Chris Anderson takes you to the front lines of a new industrial revolution as today’s entrepreneurs, using open source design and 3-D printing, bring manufacturing to the desktop. In an age of custom-fabricated, do-it-yourself product design and creation, the collective potential of a million garage tinkerers and enthusiasts is about to be unleashed, driving a resurgence of American manufacturing. A generation of "Makers" using the Web’s innovation model will help drive the next big wave in the global economy, as the new technologies of digital design and rapid prototyping gives everyone the power to invent.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Glimpse Into the Future

  • By John on 01-12-13

Hobbyists out to make a dent in the universe

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-27-12

A well written book on the niche subject of making stuff using digital and 3D printing technologies. A likely read for hackers, people who like to tear things apart to find out how it works inside, people who want to make things with their computer, and aspirating product designers doing really cool stuff. Also, the author provides a good view into the manufacturing ways of the future (and its not just in China).

  • Flash Foresight

  • How to See the Invisible and Do the Impossible
  • By: Daniel Burrus, John David Mann
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 199
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115

Today we all face more impossible challenges than ever before. But flash foresight lets you transform the impossible into the possible, revealing hidden opportunities and allowing you to solve your biggest problems before they happen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Time Sensitive

  • By Roy on 01-30-11

Profound in its simplicity

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-12

What made the experience of listening to Flash Foresight the most enjoyable?

This book is a surprisingly good read. It lays out a solid methodology for identifying new business opportunities, which others have missed. It is simple and straight forward, but profound in its approach and clarity. While the author suffers from being somewhat of a "hype machine" in his other writings and website, this does not detract from the core of this book.

Is it a timeless classic? No. The examples used in the book will become dated quickly over the next few years. However, it is definitely worth a read for anyone seeking to find new and innovative opportunities. I would have expected this book to become popular with the start up gurus of Silicon Valley, but it appears to have found very limited traction there.

  • The Master Switch

  • The Rise and Fall of Information Empires
  • By: Tim Wu
  • Narrated by: Marc Vietor
  • Length: 14 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,239
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 867
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 866

Could history repeat itself, with one giant entity taking control of American information? Most consider the Internet Age to be a moment of unprecedented freedom in communications and culture. But as Tim Wu shows, each major new medium, from telephone to cable, arrived on a similar wave of idealistic optimism only to become, eventually, the object of industrial consolidation profoundly affecting how Americans communicate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great Read

  • By Roy on 11-12-10

Weak with inconsistent analysis of global trends

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-11

A good listen, but unfortunately this book does not deliver a compelling overarching theory of technology development for the future. This is primarily due to Dr. Wu's limited analysis of global economic trends beyond the shores of America. The USA represents about 25% of the global GDP at present. However, the book fails to robustly analyze and account for the impact of the 'rest of the world' (i.e. the remaining 75% of global GDP) in his prescription for the future. This is a significant weakness in his analysis.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Superclass

  • The Global Power Elite and the World They Are Making
  • By: David Rothkopf
  • Narrated by: Patrick Lawlor
  • Length: 16 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

Each of them is one in a million. They number 6,000 on a planet of six billion. They run our governments, our largest corporations, the powerhouses of international finance, the media, world religions, and, from the shadows, the world's most dangerous criminal and terrorist organizations. They are the global superclass, and they are shaping the history of our time.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Narrator Patrick Lawler is the highlight

  • By Wicked Celtics on 05-19-15

Pass

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-08

The core message and rare nuggets of compelling data of this book are lost by the author's need to justify his own social standing and habit of descending into the 'weeds' on semi-relevant tangents. If the length of the book were shortened by half, it could be a more interesting read.

9 of 13 people found this review helpful