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  • reviews
  • 195
  • helpful votes
  • 47
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  • 14

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,993
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36,117
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36,123

There are some odd things about Nate’s new apartment. Of course, he has other things on his mind. He hates his job. He has no money in the bank. No girlfriend. No plans for the future. So while his new home isn’t perfect, it’s livable. The rent is low, the property managers are friendly, and the odd little mysteries don’t nag at him too much. At least, not until he meets Mandy, his neighbor across the hall, and notices something unusual about her apartment. And Xela’s apartment. And Tim’s. And Veek’s.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Overrated

  • By David on 04-03-13

The 14 is Great Contemporary Science Fiction!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

Just finished 14 and The Fold by Peter Clines back to back over four days. Here are my impressions.

14 was great. 14 was a well written, thrilling and an interesting page-turner with interesting characters and a well defined story. The Fold was not great. The Fold was poorly written, not very interesting after the first two-thirds of the book and the characters were nearly unbearable to listen to.

In 14, the main characters were really interesting, quirky and just perfect for Peter Clines' story. The 14 climax was well done and the sci-fi details were enough to keep hard-core sci-fi readers satisfied. In other words, 14 was a monumental achievement and I could not put it down. I was not disappointed in 14 at any point in the story.

14 has very interesting characters, all of them. These interesting characters make the 14 by Peter Clines special. The biggest downfall of the Fold was the fact that in The Fold the main characters are all cast to be highly intelligent people running one of the world's most important experimental physics project, but they act like college or even high school dropouts who scream the same juvenile four-letter profanity (which I cannot write here or Audible's AI engine will delete my review) at every twist and term. Because of the juvenile, profane characters in The Fold, I found it nearly unbearable to listen to after the fold expands beyond the Albuquerque Door.

I thought 14 was some of the best contemporary science fiction I have listened to in years. The 14 is a great story.

For the first half of The Fold, I felt like The Fold might be even better than 14. But as soon as the story in The Fold got past the initial character development and moved on to the mishaps at the Albuquerque Door (the fold), the story in The Fold was terrible. Yes, it was cool that we could see the plot of 14 interwoven into The Fold, but the problem was that the characters in The Fold were shallow and juvenile. I started to subliminally predict (accurately) at every twist and turn which four letter profane word would come from the mouth of the characters under duress. I thought at that point, WOW.... the quality of The Fold is so much lower than 14. My opinion of Peter Clines went from one of deep admiration (after finishing 14) to one of sincere disappointment (after finishing The Fold).

Again, 14 by Peter Clines was great, must listen to, contemporary sci-fi. Skip The Fold by the same author, unless of course you want to compare the two Peter Clines stories.

In closing, for students of literature, comparing 14 to The Fold is a great exercise in how important characters and character development is to a story. 14 is a masterpiece in many aways.

0 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Fold

  • By: Peter Clines
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 10 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,145
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,130
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28,083

The folks in Mike Erikson's small New England town would say he's just your average, everyday guy. And that's exactly how Mike likes it. Sure, the life he's chosen isn't much of a challenge to someone with his unique gifts, but he's content with his quiet and peaceful existence. That is, until an old friend presents him with an irresistible mystery, one that Mike is uniquely qualified to solve.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fun premise, great performance, weak story

  • By J. Klinghoffer on 08-06-15

14 is much better than The Fold - Trust Me :)

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

Just finished 14 and The Fold by Peter Clines back to back over four days. Here are my impressions.

14 was great. 14 was a well written, thrilling and an interesting page-turner with interesting characters and a well defined story. The Fold was not great. The Fold was poorly written, not very interesting after the first two-thirds of the book and the characters were nearly unbearable to listen to.

The biggest downfall of the Fold was the fact that in The Fold the main characters are all cast to be highly intelligent people running one of the world's most important experimental physics project, but they act like college or even high school dropouts who scream the same juvenile four-letter profanity (which I cannot write here or Audible's AI engine will delete my review) at every twist and term. Because of the juvenile, profane characters in The Fold, I found it nearly unbearable to listen to after the fold expands beyond the Albuquerque Door. In other words, the entire climax of The Fold was very poorly written. I actually came close to stop listening to the Fold at the three-quarters mark, very disappointed after just finishing 14. I thought 14 was some of the best contemporary science fiction I have listened to in years, so I reluctantly listened forward to the rest of The Fold.

In 14, the main characters were really interesting, quirky and just perfect for Peter Clines' story. The 14 climax was well done and the sci-fi details were enough to keep hard-core sci-fi readers satisfied. In other words, 14 was a monumental achievement and I could not put it down. I was not disappointed in 14 at any point in the story.

For the first half of The Fold, I felt like The Fold might be even better than 14. But as soon as the story in The Fold got past the initial character development and moved on to the mishaps at the Albuquerque Door (the fold), the story in The Fold was terrible. Yes, it was cool that we could see the plot of 14 interwoven into The Fold, but the problem was that the characters in The Fold were shallow and juvenile. I started to subliminally predict (accurately) at every twist and turn which four letter profane word would come from the mouth of the characters under duress. I thought at that point, WOW.... the quality of The Fold is so much lower than 14. My opinion of Peter Clines went from one of deep admiration (after finishing 14) to one of sincere disappointment (after finishing The Fold).

Of course, your mileage may vary, and if you are into juvenile, profanity-laced dialog from poorly developed, out-of-place characters, you might enjoy The Fold (LOL). If you have not listened to The Fold yet and have not yet listened to 14, I highly suggest you listen to 14 first.

Personally, I cannot recommend The Fold; but highly recommend 14 without reservation.

  • Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now

  • By: Jaron Lanier
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 270
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 237

You might have trouble imagining life without your social media accounts, but virtual reality pioneer Jaron Lanier insists that we’re better off without them. In his important new audiobook, Lanier, who participates in no social media, offers powerful and personal reasons for all of us to leave these dangerous online platforms behind before it’s too late. Lanier remains a tech optimist, so while demonstrating the evil that rules social media business models today, he also envisions a humanistic setting for social networking that can direct us towards richer and fuller way of living and connecting.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the most important books in recent history

  • By Zack Orr on 06-26-18

Excellent Overview of Downside of Social Media

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-22-18

There is a lot of good ideas presented in Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now by Jaron Lanier.

However, it's always best to stay objective and "follow the middle path". Actually, it's not necessary to "delete your social media accounts" to accomplish 90% (pick a number) of the goals and objectives Jaron advocates. You can simply use your phone much less and, at the same time, correctly set your privacy, location and ad settings (disable them). While this is not a perfect solution it is much better than the alternative of just deleting your account in a world where many importance services use social media, including your local fire department, utility company and other important services.

The problem with Jaron's hard core perspective is that he does not use social media to engage with the many services that have moved to social media, like the local fire department, rescue services, weather services, tsunami alert services and more. Jaron is a very smart and articular person, but he advocates an unnecessarily extreme position and perhaps that is what he wished to do - "shock and awe the audience".

I think the same applies to food, drink, sex and just about everything. In the Western diet, most of the foods people consume, especially sugar, is bad for the body. We don't tell people do delete all sweet foods from their diet. OK, that's not a very good analogy, but you get the idea. Extremism is not the answer to the social media problem we are facing in society.

You should definitely set your privacy settings on Facebook and Google to not track your location and not use your personal information for ad targeting. You should not use the Login with Facebook feature when you access other sites (never do this) and you should turn off sharing information with any app. If you use your settings correctly. and check them regularly, and restrict Facebook correctly, that will go a long way to take you off the main grid. Also, turn off running Facebook in the background so you are only using Facebook when you are actually using Facebook. Your battery will also last longer.

I really enjoyed Jaron's book and admire his intellect and communications skills. I'm sure I will listen to another one of his audio books. This book was great and I really enjoyed it even though I did find the position Jaron took a bit extreme, especially for someone who does not use social media for the services that benefit so many people. On the other hand, I agree with him that there is a huge problem and tremendous growing pains with social media; but unlike Jaron, I have faith the privacy pendulum will swing back toward more and more privacy choices. It always does.

  • Black Hole

  • How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved
  • By: Marcia Bartusiak
  • Narrated by: Randye Kaye
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 52

For more than half a century, physicists and astronomers engaged in heated dispute over the possibility of black holes in the universe. The weirdly alien notion of a space-time abyss from which nothing escapes - not even light - seemed to confound all logic. This engrossing audiobook tells the story of the fierce black hole debates and the contributions of Einstein, Hawking, and other leading thinkers who completely altered our view of the universe.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great into to black holes

  • By serine on 01-23-16

Well Written, Excellent Narration, Five Stars Plus

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-21-18

Black Hole, How an Idea Abandoned by Newtonians, Hated by Einstein, and Gambled on by Hawking Became Loved by Marcia Bartusiak, was so well done that I did not want to miss a single word; so ended up listening to half of the book twice when I got distracted. This is a great book. Highly recommended.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

  • By: Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Narrated by: Neil deGrasse Tyson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,510
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 21,085
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,897

What is the nature of space and time? How do we fit within the universe? How does the universe fit within us? There's no better guide through these mind-expanding questions than acclaimed astrophysicist and best-selling author Neil deGrasse Tyson. But today, few of us have time to contemplate the cosmos. So Tyson brings the universe down to Earth succinctly and clearly, with sparkling wit, in digestible chapters consumable anytime and anywhere in your busy day.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome book for those new to astrophysics.

  • By TMort on 06-07-17

IMAX for Audible

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry by Neil deGrasse Tyson is an audio version of the kind of documentaries we love in IMAX cinemas. I prefer more scientific books which tend to be more factual and detailed versus these "wooo, the universe is so big and wonderful and we are so small in comparison" books. However, for those who are not really into science, or just want some high level concepts, and want an IMAX version of astrophysics, this good by Neil deGrasse Tyson is great.

In closing, this was not one of my favorite books on science or physics, but I can easily understand why there are currently 21K ++ positive reviews of Astrophysics for People in a Hurry. Well done, especially if you take it for what is is - astrophysics for laypeople in a hurry.

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry is a "wow, the universe is so big and complicated and we are so small" IMAX kinda story.

  • Emma

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Jane Austen, Anna Lea - adaptation
  • Narrated by: Emma Thompson, Joanne Froggatt, Isabella Inchbald, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,265
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,539
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,486

This Audible Original production of Jane Austen’s Emma is narrated by Emma Thompson (Academy Award, Golden Globe, Emmy and BAFTA winner, Love Actually, Harry Potter, Sense and Sensibility), with a full supporting cast including Joanne Froggatt (Downton Abbey, Liar), Morgana Robinson (The Windsors, Walliams & Friend, Morgana Robinson's the Agency), Aisling Loftus (Mr Selfridge, War & Peace), Joseph Millson (Casino Royale, The Sarah Jane Adventures), Alexa Davies (Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again) and rising star Isabella Inchbald as our eponymous heroine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well, that was wonderful

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-07-18

Free, Give-Away Books as Audible Best Sellers?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

It's a flawed policy to give away books for free and then feature the same book on bestseller lists.

This policy / practice should be stopped at Audible.

I liked this classic novel and like most people, only downloaded it because it was free.

These audiobooks which are given away for free or sold at deep discounts should not be on the best sellers list.

Maybe Amazon and Audible could create a new list:

"Best Give-a-Ways"

It is really unfair to do this, release books for free, give them away, discount them 80 to 90% and then feature them on the best seller list.

This practice should stop.

  • Fear

  • Trump in the White House
  • By: Bob Woodward
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,656
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,935
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,829

With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files, and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One, and the White House residence.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Repetitive

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-29-18

Trump - The Locker Room, Archie Bunker President

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-18

Bob Woodard has written an outstanding, authoritative and highly believable exposé on the first half of the Donald Trump presidency. A avid fan and student of American history and politics, I listened to Fear, Trump in the White House over a two day period and enjoyed every minute of it.

To date, I have listened to nine (9) Audible books related to Trump (1) Fear, Trump in the White House, (2) House of Trump, House of Putin: The Untold Story of Donald Trump and the Russian Mafia, (3) Facts and Fears, Messing with the Enemy: Surviving in a Social Media World of Hackers, Terrorists, Russians, and Fake News, (4) A Higher Loyalty: Truth, Lies, and Leadership, (5) Russian Roulette, (6) A Very Expensive Poison: The Assassination of Alexander Litvinenko and Putin's War with the West, (7) The Plot to Hack America: How Putin's Cyberspies and WikiLeaks Tried to Steal the 2016 Election, (8) Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House, and (9) Collusion: Secret Meetings, Dirty Money, and How Russia Helped Donald Trump Win.

Fear, by Bob Woodard is without a doubt, the most objective and balanced book I have read so far. Bob and his book are actually very kind to Donald Trump. If you strip away the "locker room talk", all the "f*** this and f****ing that" banter and "good ole' boys" Archie Bunker talk, what we get is simply a unpresidential president. Trump is a "locker room kinda guy" and he likes to surround himself with similar "locker room kinda guy" people.

Really, my fellow Americans, what do you expect of a guy who has never been accountable to anyone and who is used to getting what he wants most all the time (women, fame, fortune, attention)? Trump was elected by "the people" who wanted and accepted (and seem to love) a "locker room kinda guy" who really knows nothing about American foreign policy or global economics or diplomacy. The hard truth of the matter, conceding that Trump was elected with the help of Russian and other "dirty tricks', is that a huge voting block of American people voted for this "locker room, Archie Bunker" meat-and-potatoes president.

I am also, obviously, a fan of MSNBC and CNN; however, the press (including MSNBC and CNN) has disappointedly cherry-picked a few sensational negative-situation paragraphs from Fear by Bob Woodward and painted a very inaccurate picture of his book. Trump is an "old school, Archie Bunker nationalist". He loves America, but his vision of America is far different than mine or the majority of Americans. Trump is like a rich Archie Bunker who managed to go to collage, laments about the "good old days of white America" (without saying the word "white") . Trump loves sights and sounds of the old steel industry, Mac trucks, while having a beer and a burger with his pals, trash talking this and that, mostly ignorant of the facts, and making things up as he goes. One minute they are calling each other bad names like school-yard boys in the playground, the next minute they are looking at women and gossiping about their sexuality and what they would do with them. They are "locker room guys" and this book goes deep inside the locker room. Great job Bob Woodward.

Do we want this kind of "Trumpian" person as the US president? Well, that is what the November 2018 mid-term elections will tell. Personally, I hope the Democrats sweep the House and take over and help America get to the bottom of all this self-dealing corruption and "locker room deals" that Trump and his followers are now famous for. But I also understand that I do not want Mike Pence to replace Donald Trump as president. Pence is not the solution. Pence is just another problem, and a very serious one, in my view. I think it is better to have a "locker room president" than a "the almighty whispered in my ear and told me to do it president" so we are currently between a rock and a hard place in US politics.

What this book is not? Fear is no a scathing indictment of Trump as many in the new media would have us believe. Fear is an objective and factual account of the inside of the Trump White House, locker room banter, trash talk and all. Yes, Trump is not knowledgable in the ways of government, politics, diplomacy, war, science, match, technology, economics or anything required to be US president in 2018. Trump is a trash talking, brash, real-estate developer. Trump is a hamburger eating, meat and potatoes, white nationalist, "I love America when it's white and like me" kinda guy. Trump is the Archie Bunker President, except Trump is reported to be rich and "well educated" in top schools. Trump is a danger, there is no doubt; but he was elected with the help of Russia (a country also full of white people) and so, like most people, Trump views Russia, who helped him, favorably. It's simple meat-and-potatoes, Archie Bunker, isolationism and nationalism.

I hope and pray that the Democrats sweep the House and run full investigations into the self-dealing of the Trump administration and the cover-ups related to Russia and elsewhere. Bob Woodward's excellent book is not an indictment of Donald J. Trump. Bob's book is simply an insider view at what happens inside the White House when a trash talking, "locker room kinda guy" is voted into office by the folks in American who feel forgotten and not a part of the new information-age economy. These are the American's who are nostalgic for "white America with steel mills and coal mines", strong borders and want an "in your face", conflict-based foreign policy.

Donald J. Trump is the Locker Room, Archie Bunker president, that is the core theme in Bob Woodward's book, at least when I listened to it over a two day period.

Hat's off to Bob Woodward for another great book. You are a national treasure Bob Woodward.

5 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Neuromancer

  • By: William Gibson
  • Narrated by: Robertson Dean
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,826
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4,384
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,397

Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. The winner of Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene - it permeated into the collective consciousness, culture, science, and technology.Today, there is only one science fiction masterpiece to thank for the term "cyberpunk," for easing the way into the information age and Internet society.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great book. Terrible performance.

  • By Denis on 04-08-16

Neuromancer: Skip this and listen to Snow Crash

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

Just finished listening to "Snow Crash," "Ready Player One," " Daemon," and " Freedom TM"; along with a number of other cyber-dystopian thrillers. Then with high expectations, I purchased "Neuromancer" by William Gibson, performance by Robertson Dean. At first, "Neuromancer" was interesting; but then for reasons hard to explain, the plot fades off to nothingness and the narration seem inappropriate for such a highly recommended historical work of fiction.

I resist the inner call to return this novel to Audible and decide to listen all the way to the end.

At times, "Neuromancer" seems to want to rise up beyond the mundane, then it crashed back to boring. I tried to rationalize the failure in the plot to "being dated" and hoped that the ending would be worth the wait. However, my hope was in vain, and the ending was not interesting at all.

I remain confused on "what" I just listened to and "what" the plot was actually supposed to be. Was there a message? I seemed to have missed it all. The story line meandered around like a stray feral kitten on a busy street, too small to make a difference and too young to know what to do or where to go.

So far, of the many dystopian books in this genre I have listened to, I would say that "Ready Player One" was the best; followed by "Snow Crash" and then "Daemon". "Neuromancer" is not in the same league as those epic novels.

Maybe the problem was the performance by Robertson Dean? I can't really put my finger own it why "Neuromancer" did not work for me.

Not really recommended; unless like me you are a great fan of dystopian sci-fi and cyber-thrillers and want to read one of the first cyberpunk novels.

Otherwise, skip "Neuromancer" and listen to "Ready Player One," "Snow Crash" and/or "Daemon".

  • Why We Sleep

  • Unlocking the Power of Sleep and Dreams
  • By: Matthew Walker PhD
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 13 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,578
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,299
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,271

Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our life, wellness, and longevity. Until very recently, science had no answer to the question of why we sleep, or what good it served, or why we suffer such devastating health consequences when we don't sleep. Compared to the other basic drives in life - eating, drinking, and reproducing - the purpose of sleep remained elusive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The best book on sleep bar none

  • By Innate on 12-10-17

Sleep & Sleep and Dream & Dream for a Healthy Life

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-18

"Why We Sleep" 'outs' one of the greatest secrets of all times. Sleep and Dreaming.

Matthew Walker has done an outstanding job writing this book especially considering it covers a wide range of sleep-related topics (from basic ideas to clinical studies). Personally, as a semi-retired IT professional living in a constant ocean breeze on the seaside surrounded by the sounds of surf, I tend to sleep 8 to 9 hours a day and sleep has always been when I have solved all my most complex IT or coding problems. The same was also true decades ago when at the university, my mind trained (informally) to solve problems while asleep. This same technique served me very well over the years in my professional engineering life; and now I understand why thanks to Dr. Walker.

I was always so much more productive than my peers. Sleep. Deep Sleep. REM Sleep. Dreaming REM Sleep. In fact, for years, I have had a ritual of going over problems in mind, in a relaxing. meditative way, before sleep, maybe even watching a fun YouTube video tutorial on the topic, but not intensely, before going to sleep. I've been queuing up problems to solve in this manner for years; and always wake up refreshed with a solution ready to go.

One of the things I did not like about this book was the fact that Matthew Walker spent too much time on sleep abnormalities and rare sleep disorder, substance abuse and other topics not related or of a concern to me personally; but on the other hand, my good fortune means I need to realize others may not be so lucky to sleep well and do not dream deeply nearly every night. Now I understand why so many around me are not as productive or happy. They don't sleep well or sleep and dream deeply. I had no idea before reading (listening to) Matthew Walker's book.

Also, to be honest, I'm not crazy about Steve West's narration. Steve West has a great voice; but he makes the book sound too academic at times and takes the fun out of the parts of the book where humor would help get the point across better. I guess I'm not a huge Steve West fan, but that's me.

In addition, since I do not have trouble sleeping, I found all the tiny details like "having a hot bath before sleeping" to be a bit annoying; since I don't need hot baths, or to make adjustments here and there, to sleep well. It's 11:30 PM now while I type this and the sound of the ocean surf is rocking me to sleep already, LOL.

Overall, this is a great audiobook. Highly Recommended.

There is no doubt that the world would be a safer, healthier, more wonderful place if all human beings got 8 hours of deep sleep with hours of REM dream sleep per day. However, just as people know that smoking is bad for them, or excessive alcohol usage or sugar and excessive food consumption is bad for them, they still do all these unhealthy things. So, it's unlikely that this great book with change the bad habits of those who do not understand how important it is to take good care of ourselves. However, if on the other hand, Matthew Walker's book on sleep changes the lives of just a handful of people, then his book is already a huge success. He has certainly helped me understand sleep much better.

Great Book. Thanks Dr. Walker! Highly Recommended to Everyone.

  • Dark Matter

  • A Novel
  • By: Blake Crouch
  • Narrated by: Jon Lindstrom
  • Length: 10 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,752
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,404
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,405

"Are you happy with your life?" Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason's never met smiles down at him and says, "Welcome back, my friend."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Believable Multiverse

  • By Michael L. Moore on 02-18-17

Juvenile Sci Fi with a Boring Obsessive Love Story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-18

It's amazing to read these thousand of great reviews and then actually listen to this novel, start to finish in two days.

First of all, this story starts out pretty good. The pace is fast. The quantum physics angle is interesting and has potential. The character development is OK. After the first few chapters, I think this will be epic science fiction.

Then, after the protagonist Jason goes on and on (and on) above his obsession with his wife I realize that this novel will be about 5 percent science fiction, 25 percent drama, and 70 percent a love story. No worries, I decide to go with it and the protagonist's love for his wife and family is heartwarming and tear-jerking.

Then, halfway though the novel, the science fiction is null and void for the most part, and the story is 99 percent about an immature man obsessed with his wife, multiplied by 100 stalking clones. I feel like I am reading a romantic tragedy about an immature man who becomes an obsessive stalker and the chapters and chapters about "her lips", "her hair", "her legs", "her smile" and why every copy of him in the metaverse are all so obsessed with his wife, they will all kill to be with her. Boring.

I start to think, wow, this is just a juvenile romance story about an immature protagonist who is so obsessed with his wife that we must listen to this obsession so much that I wonder how this book can be called "science fiction' with so little science and so much "we would die for her, do anything for her" nonsense.

This ends up a terrible novel with a shallow plot which is suitable for children. It's juvenile fiction, at best. At worse, it is a tragedy because this novel could have been an epic scifi story about quantum physics, the metaverse, and deep philosophy; but Dark Matter turns out to be a somewhat cheap, paperback romance novel. Shallow. Boring. Childish.

The second half of this novel became really boring with all the redundant "obsessive, stalker' immature man nonsense which soiled the early ideas based on string theory and quantum physics.

This novel is not recommended for hard core scifi fans (like me) or people with technical degrees (like me).

Dark Matter is recommended for teens under 18 and perhaps hard core adult fans of paperback romance novels.

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