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  • The Mists of Avalon

  • By: Marion Zimmer Bradley
  • Narrated by: Davina Porter
  • Length: 50 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,452
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,062
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,072

A posthumous recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement, Marion Zimmer Bradley reinvented - and rejuvenated - the King Arthur mythos with her extraordinary Mists of Avalon series. In this epic work, Bradley follows the arc of the timeless tale from the perspective of its previously marginalized female characters: Celtic priestess Morgaine, Gwenhwyfar, and High Priestess Viviane.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Davina Porter brings an old favorite back to life!

  • By Carolina on 07-13-12

One of my favorites, done so well in audio!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

The Mists of Avalon is one of my all time favorite books, and I was so nervous to listen to it performed as an audio book, in case it didn't live up to the experience of reading it in print and diving in to that other world. But really it was so well done, whew!

Others have recapped the book so I'm just going to focus on how beautifully told this story is of the women in the King Arthur legend. Viviane, Igraine, Morgaine, all of them smart and powerful and capable, making the hard choices and following their own paths with so much strength. The characters are so real. It's rare to read real, fleshed-out female characters in a fantasy novel and this tale completely revolves around so many of them. It's 60 hours of story telling but I never wanted it to end.

Davina Porter was a great narrator for this. I don't know what happened to her in the Outlander series where she made the main character sound like a super old woman, but in this narration she puts depth and soul into the characters and matches the tone and atmosphere of the book very well.

Fantastic all around.

  • The Count of Monte Cristo

  • By: Alexandre Dumas
  • Narrated by: Bill Homewood
  • Length: 52 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,020
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,589
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,589

On the eve of his marriage to the beautiful Mercedes, having that very day been made captain of his ship, the young sailor Edmond Dantès is arrested on a charge of treason, trumped up by jealous rivals. Incarcerated for many lonely years in the isolated and terrifying Chateau d'If near Marseille, he meticulously plans his brilliant escape and extraordinary revenge.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • This is the one to spend 50 hours listening to!

  • By james on 03-05-13

Wanted so much to love this, but just dragged

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I love fantasy novels, especially series, and even more so when I can get invested in the characters that have huge story arcs in fantasy series. I wanted so much to love this highly rated series but after three tries spanning several months, I just finally finished book 1, and it felt like a real slog. Why? Because despite the great writing and excellent narration, the story itself just dragged.

It starts out very strong! In terms of character development: I loved Father Chains, and he was BY FAR the most fleshed out character introduced to us, and secondarily Capa Barsavi I also had a clear picture of as the story progressed. Locke, the main character - he remains something of a cardboard cutout to me. I don't really care about him, I don't really know how he feels about anything, I just know a bunch about individual things that he does - but it never comes together as a person, just a lot of facts stacked together. Jean I have no mental image of, though I started to while he was in training. Calo and Galdo are completely throw-away generic characters. Bug, the side-kick tagalong apprentice is a bright spot in character development and I really found myself caring what happened to him. The Grey King is like 'generic evil puppet master', so ... meh, didn't care. Therefore the claim of 'I'm the Grey King!' by a new character was lost on me. The Bondsmage was interesting, but such a cliche for fantasy fiction. I just wished there was something new happening, something interesting, a new type of character or personality or magic.

As for the story line, I was riding along enjoyably enough until what I thought was the climactic scene 3/4 of the way through the book with Locke and company setting up this ruse against Capa Barsavi, and then (without spoilers) a lot of violence and action follows. Had the book wrapped up some loose ends and then set up the second book just after this, I'd have though it was interesting enough to want to read the second novel. But the story just kept going from there, tying up some of the loose ends from the Bondsmage and the long-con the group had been setting up before all the violence - great - but also adding in all of these layers of 'who stole our fortune?' searches and both sides plotting and enacting revenge plans. It was a crowded last quarter of the book and I just wasn't invested in it by the time I got there. With all the fleshed-out characters gone by this point in the book, we're only left with Locke and Jean, the two really vaguely drawn and uninteresting characters to carry the story. In truth, had Locke and Jean died and Bug and Chains remained, I'd have eagerly read book 2. As it is I just don't care enough about the remaining characters to continue.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dark Matter

  • A Novel
  • By: Blake Crouch
  • Narrated by: Jon Lindstrom
  • Length: 10 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,399
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,994
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,995

"Are you happy with your life?" Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious. Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits. Before a man Jason's never met smiles down at him and says, "Welcome back, my friend."

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Schrödinger's box gets opened. Meh steps out.

  • By Darwin8u on 09-19-16

Eh, it was okay

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

This is pretty quick and shallow summer read. I really like a good multiverse story and this definitely had pieces of a good story in the book's concept, it just didn't flesh any of them out in an overly interesting way.

We have Jason, a physicist currently teaching college undergrads at a second rate University near Chicago, but formerly a reportedly brilliant researcher in his younger days, who gave up the fast track to physics fame to have a low key family life. We have some narrative ponderings about the path not taken, and some narrative descriptions of quantum theory and the multiverse. Into that set-up we have a blustery night, a Jason returning from a congratulatory pub party for a far more successful science friend, and a mysterious stranger who kidnaps our humble Jason and thrusts him into the multiverse where he spends the rest of the book contemplating the infinities of paths not taken and just trying to get back home.

I don't think there are any spoilers in that, as this is the set up you're expecting from the start. I think this story could have been told in a lot of thought provoking ways, but in this case it wasn't. It was literally just that scaffold with some action superimposed on top of it. It wasn't terrible, it was just kind of unmemorable.

  • A Little Life

  • A Novel
  • By: Hanya Yanagihara
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 32 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,896
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,193
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,198

When four classmates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they're broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their center of gravity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I had to call in SAD to work

  • By Angela on 10-17-15

Tried hard but utterly failed to be interested

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-17

I love audiobooks and have a lot of patience with slow-starters, but this was a mind numbingly boring, dust-in-the-eyes irritating, beige smear of a story line. I guess it was depressing, I know the subject matter was depressing, but I was so detached from any of the unrealistic, unrelatable characters that I really didn't feel depressed while reading it. I wasn't that involved with any of them.

First of all it took me about half the book to be able to distinguish any of the characters from each other. They were all variations on the same person. Jude was 'that person' with pain in his legs. JB was that same person slightly more outgoing. I had to keep wondering - wait, is that the one that lives with the guy with hurt legs, or is that the artist? Who's the one with the parents with the brownstone? How could the author not make the characters individual enough to even recognize from each other? Seriously these characters were so meh, and the narration so all over the place (sometimes one or the other character would be narrated with some odd accent they'd never had before) that with very few verbal indicators of who was talking, it got super confusing to attribute words to specific characters.

Also I couldn't understand why they were so constantly talking about their relationships to each other. Do men with decades of friendship actually sit around analyzing their feelings for each other? And if so, do I really want or need to read about it so often? There wasn't nothing revolutionary or revelatory in them. If I had been reading the paper or kindle book, I'd have been massively skimming.

I have to admit I gave up about 3/4 of the way through. I just didn't care what happened to any of them and had given up waiting for it to happen. When I read the synopsis later that summed up the part I hadn't read, I still didn't care and was annoyed that this was the thing that it was leading up to. Ugh.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Seductive Poison

  • A Jonestown Survivor's Story of Life and Death in the Peoples Temple
  • By: Deborah Layton
  • Narrated by: Kathe Mazur, Deborah Layton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 298
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272

Told by a former high-level member of the Peoples Temple and Jonestown survivor, Seductive Poison is the "truly unforgettable" (Kirkus Reviews) story of how one woman was seduced by one of the most notorious cults in recent memory and how she found her way back to sanity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, Haunting, Chilling

  • By Daryl on 04-16-15

Rare book I listened to twice!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-17

This was a fascinating book with beautiful narration. Debbie Layton tells the story of her early indoctrination into the People's Temple cult and her rise through the ranks, relationship with Jim Jones and her eventual nail-biting escape and whistle-blowing efforts with the US government.

One of the things I loved first about her story is that she wrote it after she'd clearly spent a lot of time thinking deeply about all of the things that led her and 1000 other people into following Jim Jones, and the complicated reasons she stayed with him after the racially diverse, happily integrated and supportive church revealed itself to be a megalomaniac driven cult. She does such a good job painting the picture of the national emotional tenor of the 1960's and 70's, the relationships she had with her parents and friends, the mindset of a teenager, the needs human beings have for being seen and appreciated and taking part in something they believe to be special and important - that I actually found myself understanding why the People's Temple was such a strong draw for her and others. The church they joined was not a cult to their eyes, not at first - and Jim Jones really was progressive in his early messages of racial unity, and because of this he really did seem to have the answers for how people could live together and help each other positively.

Of course things eventually fall apart. Jim Jones had people signing homes and social security checks over to him. Demands on church members grew and grew. All of that still seemed necessary at first, as there were so many good works in progress and actual facilities for elderly people being erected and lived in. People kept giving of their time and work and money. Just when things reached a point in church demands where a reasonable person would start to feel resentment and question the motives of the person taking their money, Jim Jones carefully constructed a series of fake attacks that created a common enemy of the church that threatened their unity and happiness. In reality, it was Jones' theft and growing sexual abuse of church members and essentially creating an unpaid labor camp that was destroying the church, but he did such a good job constructing the visions of evil enemies standing right outside their doors, "the CIA" threatening them, an uncaring society misunderstanding them, a government jealously salivating after their financial reserves - that everyone banded even tighter together to fight side by side against these threats. This allows Jim Jones (the real enemy) to continue quietly abusing his power and his congregation, unchallenged.

The insider view of Debbie Layton is really mesmerizing. To a point, her internal reactions are so understandable that for the first time I really "got" why people end up in cults. Her story continues as she's in her 20's and moving up through the ranks, paranoia slowly intensifying in the cult until it controls everyone's every action. Her life goes from one of feeling useful and special to feeling constantly afraid for herself, her family and her life. By the time she wakes up to the realities of her situation, she's in too deep to easily run for it - everyone is a secret informant, no one can be trusted, everyone fears for their lives, Jim Jones convinces them there are armed enemies waiting for them in the bushes if they were to try to leave, plus he has literal armed guards pointing guns at cult members 'for their own safety'. The chapters where Debbie Layton plots an escape and executes it - no thanks to the bumbling, clueless American diplomats in Guyana - were so harrowing I was stressed the entire time I was listening to it.

The massacre just a few weeks after her escape is written as she imagines it. It's heartbreaking. She knew (and in the book humanized) so many of the people who drank the poison, or were injected forcibly when they tried to choose to live. The aftermath, the way she felt and was treated, the way she tried to put her life back together and the lessons she'd learned - these chapters were so necessary for this book. She ends it with some pretty powerful lessons learned and some insight into current cults (The L Ron Hubbard cult was one of Jim Jone's models for his own). It's really a fantastic, well written, well thought out account of life in a cult and the Jonestown massacre.

The narration was stunning - you can hear it in the sample, but the voice actor also does a fantastic job with different voices, accents and intonations. Her Jim Jones voice was dead on the money, I was startled to find (after watching documentaries and listening to tapes of his speeches) - whoa. Highly recommend this book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Other Side of History: Daily Life in the Ancient World

  • By: Robert Garland, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Robert Garland
  • Length: 24 hrs and 28 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,637
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,124
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,090

Look beyond the abstract dates and figures, kings and queens, and battles and wars that make up so many historical accounts. Over the course of 48 richly detailed lectures, Professor Garland covers the breadth and depth of human history from the perspective of the so-called ordinary people, from its earliest beginnings through the Middle Ages.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tantalizing time trip

  • By Mark on 08-21-13

A lot of inaccurate info in here

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-17

Had I not just listened to the fantastic set of lectures by John Hawks (The Rise of Humans: Great Scientific Debates) which was so fascinating it had me reading the original research papers and some anthro textbooks, then I probably wouldn't have realized what HUGE liberties Robert Garland takes with the facts in the early chapters of this book.

For instance he tells us that scientists believe the famous partial skeleton Lucy is female only because she's short. He talks emotionally about how the ancient Laetoli footprints were made by a male walking with his arm placed protectively around a female and thus represent the earliest proof of pair bonding. He says the withered arm found on a distant human ancestor was proof that those hominids felt love for each other. He dismisses decades of DNA analysis of Neanderthals and the Human Genome Project by saying it's probably not right. But none of those stories is even close to being scientifically accurate, and in one case the 'scientist' Garland cites as the originator of the information is not a scientist at all, but travel writer Bill Bryson.

To hear decades of scientific research twisted into something completely inaccurate because it made for a better story really made me uneasy and untrusting of this man's categorical statements. So as the book went on I kept fact checking him and yep, time and time again he sacrificed accuracy for showmanship. He tells a good yarn, it's just not always true. Early human ancestry is clearly not his specialty era. I know he's a specialist in greek and roman history so I'm going to give him the benefit of the doubt in those areas, but there is no excuse for what I've heard so far - this is meant to be an educational lecture, given by someone who has taken the time to research the facts and create an interesting narrative around them, not historical fiction with liberties taken to make a smoother story.

Also he's got a hefty speech impediment that occasionally disappears for a word and then comes back. If it was consistent my brain would have tuned it out after a short while, but it comes and goes and so it was hard to filter out as I waited to see what his next S would sound like. And the way he emphasizes minor words was also distracting. I kept getting the impression he was putting on a show, playing with projecting his voice, emphasizing words for creative effect, rather than really trying to communicate. The entire thing was weirdly performance based, from the loose treatment of scientific fact to the audio, and really doesn't belong in the 'lecture/education' category.

76 of 79 people found this review helpful

  • Behind Her Eyes

  • A Novel
  • By: Sarah Pinborough
  • Narrated by: Anna Bentinck, Josie Dunn, Bea Holland, and others
  • Length: 11 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 13,859
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,801
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12,803

Louise is a single mom, a secretary, stuck in a modern-day rut. On a rare night out, she meets a man in a bar, and sparks fly. Though he leaves after they kiss, she's thrilled she finally connected with someone. When Louise arrives at work on Monday, she meets her new boss, David. The man from the bar. The very married man from the bar...who says the kiss was a terrible mistake but who still can't keep his eyes off Louise.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • What the heck...

  • By Allyssa R. on 06-16-17

Bad writing, stupid plot, waste of time

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-19-17

I can't even work up a full review. I don't know how bad writing and dumb ideas like this get published, but it's such a waste of time and effort. The 'plot' is unintelligent, boring and full of holes. The characters are unlikeable and not well fleshed out. The writing is juvenile. The narration is - well, who cares? It doesn't make the story any more enjoyable. When you see the end coming it's the dumbest possible thing - I rolled my eyes and shut it off with 20 minutes to go. It almost felt insulting to expect to invest any more time in it.

10 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Marked

  • Mindspace Investigations, Book 3
  • By: Alex Hughes
  • Narrated by: Daniel May
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 417
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 376
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 376

Freelancing for the Atlanta PD isn’t exactly a secure career; my job’s been on the line almost as much as my life. But it’s a paycheck, and it keeps me from falling back into the drug habit. Plus, things are looking up with my sometimes-partner, Cherabino, even if she is still simmering over the telepathic Link I created by accident. When my ex, Kara, shows up begging for my help, I find myself heading to the last place I ever expected to set foot in again—Guild headquarters—to investigate the death of her uncle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • EXCELLENT!!

  • By Bunty on 07-28-14

Everyone abuses Alex

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-17

So this is the third book in the Mindspace series, and I've listened to all three without giving up - so there's definitely something about these books that is listenable and interesting. This is despite the enormous, glaring plot and world-building holes, deus ex machina and characters continuously making exaggerated major actions without any discernible motivation. So even despite these huge problems, there's an underlying story that manages to be a pretty enjoyable listen.

The series centers around Alex Ward, a telepath 3 years into recovery from an intense drug addiction, presently working as a barely-tolerated consultant for the police force and shunned by the Guild of telepaths - which itself is portrayed as a shady, secretive, semi-religious and political organization that recruits and trains folks with telepathic ability and has absolute legal power over their lives and well-being.

Despite having a nearly 100% success record in his police interrogations and, as far as this series is concerned a 100% close rate in investigations of violent homicide, Adam is continuously humiliated, shamed, controlled, threatened, verbally and physically assaulted, accused, punched, kicked, bullied and insulated by his boss, coworkers, members of the Guild that raised and trained him and even by the female cop partner he's secretly in love with. Adam's employers and various other parties routinely use his powers to help them close cases, while abusing Adam viciously the entire time. I still can't figure out where this comes from. After he closes a case or saves someone's life, he's generally put on probation and threatened with losing his job and/or threatened with death and/or threatened with the death of his loved ones and/or literally punched in the face by his partner while her mind waves generate furious anger at him. Why? Who knows.

Even his former drug addiction is described as coming from a medical experiment run by the Guild, designed to improve the powers of telepaths through chemical enhancement. The medication turned out to be highly addictive, even more so for those with stronger telepathic powers, and Adam, one of the experimental subjects, was therefore immediately chemically addicted. The Guild took no responsibility for their experimentation and, after his drug use harmed some of his students, kicked him out of the Guild and stripped him of all support, assuming he'd crawl into the drug gutter and die. Shocked that he managed to kick his addiction and gain some kind of employment with the police force using his mind-reading skills to catch criminals, The Guild now hates Adam and, for reasons never spelled out, actively tries to kill him, while simultaneously using his power to help them solve their own murder cases. And then after he solves their cases for them, they again try to kill/imprison/torture him or his loved ones. Why? No idea.

Adam's telepathic powers are an ever changing grab bag of mind control, telepathy, precognition, and the ability to physically alter someone's brain. Adam is sometimes portrayed as frighteningly strong, able to put someone to sleep by "activating the sleep centers of their mind" and to kill someone with a single thought. Other times Adam is in dire straits, held captive, or watching his friends held captive, and the story forgets all those previously used abilities and he's portrayed as helpless, powerless, and unable to defend himself. I wish there were some more solid explanation for all of these odd plot choices, or some theme that tied them together.

On the plus side, the idea of a telepath/detective team can sometimes work well. The idea is good, and the bait thrown out in the last book that Adam might be consulting for the FBI is another cool idea, and I'd like to see that realized in the series (it's not in this book - the FBI like everyone else asks for Adam's help then yanks the rug out from under him) - I'm not at all sold on the romantic part of this book - it's unsexy in the extreme and just awkward and very weird. I'd like to see Adam move on in his romantic life and perhaps gain some personal empowerment, stop being everyone's punching bag and perhaps become more successful.

The narration is once again a mixed bag - I love the main narration of Adam, but the female voices are largely terrible. Luckily we have mostly Adam's voice, so it's a nice listen. I'm debating getting the next in the series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sharp

  • A Mindspace Investigations Novel, Book 2
  • By: Alex Hughes
  • Narrated by: Daniel May
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 578
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 525
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 527

As a Level Eight telepath, I am the best police interrogator in the department. But I’m not a cop - I never will be - and my only friend on the force, Homicide Detective Isabella Cherabino, is avoiding me because of a telepathic link I created by accident. And I might not even be an interrogator for much longer. Our boss says unless I pull out a miracle, I’ll be gone before Christmas. I need this job, damn it. It’s the only thing keeping me sane.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great story, I can't wait for number 3

  • By Dianne on 04-05-13

The writing is better than the story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-17

While I was reading Book 1 (Clean) I was already debating whether I wanted to grab the second in the series. The world building was slowly gaining some details, but a little too slowly. The secondary characters were getting a little fleshed out, but only a little. The main character was likable, very relatable, smart but not omniscient, flawed and aware of it, but with a few secret and not so secret strengths to keep it all interesting. And I have to say I'm at the same place in Book 2 (Sharp).

The story continues the tale of a former drug addict, a strong telepath who got kicked out of the telepath Guild and is currently working alongside the police reading minds during suspect interrogations and following his sorta-partner around to crime scenes, solving some homicides. In this book we learn more of Adam's past, his former profession and the huge mistake that got him booted off his pedestal and out of the Guild. We also get more of Adam being perpetually bullied, accused, threatened and even physically beaten by his coworkers, partner and boss. I'm not super sure how that fits into the story. His partner, a woman detective he's not so secretly in love with, literally punches him in the face as hard as she can for random everyday misunderstandings. I don't get it, I don't understand how it fits with everything else that's going on, and it's really, really weird and out of place. We have a few new characters introduced (another detective/partner, and a Minder from the Guild sent to evaluate Adam, who also swings between being described as a normal human being and a crazed mafia psychopath) and a fairly ho-hum series of crimes that serve as the backdrop to the characters and as a way for them to tell their stories. It moves fairly quickly. There is no suspense, it's not a mystery story or whodunnit, the ending is a foregone conclusion and there are a lot of easily followed set-ups for each new development. You can listen to this with your mind on other things and not miss too much.

The one BIG problem I had is the narrator's female voices. The police boss sounds like Marge Simpson's sisters, Patty and/or Selma, and Adam's former fiance Kara sounds like Count Dracula. The other females all have sorta uneducated, maybe Brooklyn-esque accents combined with something like a speech impediment. It's odd. Each time he does a woman it catapults me right out of the story. He has a surprisingly excellent voice for the main character, the NA sponsor Shwarz and the older cop who has to babysit. He just doesn't have good female voices in his arsenal. I had a hard time thinking of how many stars to give the narration because 3 seemed too small for such a great narrator voice, but 4 doesn't quite express how ludicrous the girl voices are.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Size Zero

  • My Life as a Disappearing Model
  • By: Victoire Dauxerre
  • Narrated by: Emily Lucienne
  • Length: 6 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 86
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 79

memoir of a brief career as a top model - and a brutally honest account of what goes on behind the scenes in a fascinating closed industry. Scouted in the street when she was 17, Victoire Dauxerre's story started like a teenager's dream: within months she was on the catwalks of New York's major fashion shows and part of the most select circle of in-demand supermodels in the world.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Self-indulgent twaddle

  • By Zaubermond on 05-19-17

Pretty interesting insider story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-17

I think I'm the most surprised to realize the life of a model is pretty boring, as well as dehumanizing, mind numbing and overall poorly paid. That said, Victoire told the story of all the waiting, inhumane treatment and lack of eating in a fairly interesting way. Based on the title and the profession, the inside stories of the need to be thin, the disordered eating and the sleazy managers were unsurprising. I thought her strongest storyline within the memoir was the rift her year as a model created within her family, and how her parents' complete lack of understanding about the details of her experience led them to give her disastrous parental advice over and over (Stick to it! Don't quit! You signed a contract, that's pretty serious, you should abide by it! Etc.). Once they understood what she was up against, it was very nearly too late for real intervention.

Emily Lucienne did a good job with the narration and made the author sound likeable and relatable. Overall decent book.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful