LISTENER

BryinSiam

  • 19
  • reviews
  • 43
  • helpful votes
  • 224
  • ratings
  • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20

Yuval Noah Harari’s 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today’s most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Meandering

  • By BryinSiam on 10-11-18

Meandering

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

Doesn't hold a candle to his two previous books. Derivative. Better to read Prefiction Machines and other analyses of our day. Even Stephen Harper s book Right Here and Now

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Tangled Tree

  • A Radical New History of Life
  • By: David Quammen
  • Narrated by: Jacques Roy
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 279
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 259
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 255

In the mid-1970s, scientists began using DNA sequences to reexamine the history of all life. Perhaps the most startling discovery to come out of this new field is horizontal gene transfer (HGT), or the movement of genes across species lines. For instance, we now know that roughly eight percent of the human genome arrived not through traditional inheritance from directly ancestral forms, but sideways by viral infection - a type of HGT. In The Tangled Tree David Quammen chronicles these discoveries through the lives of the researchers who made them.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very Enjoyable and Readable

  • By Dennis on 08-18-18

affected accents

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-18

FYI. Reading is reading. The reader has a great voice BUT.. Using affected accents is a distraction: almost enough in this effort to put one off and seek a refund.

2 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • The End of the Affair

  • By: Graham Greene
  • Narrated by: Colin Firth
  • Length: 6 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 7,350
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,796
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,760

Graham Greene’s evocative analysis of the love of self, the love of another, and the love of God is an English classic that has been translated for the stage, the screen, and even the opera house. Academy Award-winning actor Colin Firth ( The King’s Speech, A Single Man) turns in an authentic and stirring performance for this distinguished audio release.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Late to the Party...

  • By Doug - Audible on 07-05-17

Greene insightful: Firth brings the book alive

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-15

Would you consider the audio edition of The End of the Affair to be better than the print version?

yes, Firth's reading is brilliant.

What did you like best about this story?

Greene's insights into human nature and love pierce the heart.

What about Colin Firth’s performance did you like?

Perfect tone, nuanced, heartfelt.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

If only one could, but it bears re-reading.

Any additional comments?

I'm checking the other Greene books on Audible, but so far I don't fancy the readers.

  • The Massey Murder

  • A Maid, Her Master and the Trial that Shocked a Country
  • By: Charlotte Gray
  • Narrated by: Susan Duerden
  • Length: 8 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

In February 1915, a member of one of Canada’s wealthiest families was shot and killed on the front porch of his home in Toronto as he was returning from work. Carrie Davies, an 18-year-old domestic servant, quickly confessed. But who was the victim here? Charles "Bert" Massey, a scion of a famous family, or the frightened, perhaps mentally unstable Carrie, a penniless British immigrant?

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Sing song delivery irritating and spoils the work.

  • By BryinSiam on 10-03-15

Sing song delivery irritating and spoils the work.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-15

The story imparts elements of certain period in Ontario which is a slice of Canadian history. Unfortunately, the presentation is jarring.

  • Alan Turing: The Enigma

  • By: Andrew Hodges
  • Narrated by: Gordon Griffin
  • Length: 30 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,545
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,382
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,390

It’s only a slight exaggeration to say that the British mathematician Alan Turing (1912-1954) saved the Allies from the Nazis, invented the computer and artificial intelligence, and anticipated gay liberation by decades--all before his suicide at age forty-one. This classic biography of the founder of computer science, reissued on the centenary of his birth with a substantial new preface by the author, is the definitive account of an extraordinary mind and life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Fantastic Biography For The Patient Listener

  • By Sara on 02-22-15

Subtly trenchant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-15

Disturbing, haunting, tantalizing. Excellently read. Worthy of multiple reads. Film imitation game a tasty sample only. Consume both if you dare.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Getting to Yes with Yourself

  • (And Other Worthy Opponents)
  • By: William Ury
  • Narrated by: William Ury
  • Length: 4 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 348
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 296

William Ury, co-author of the classic best seller on negotiation Getting to Yes, has taught tens of thousands of people from all walks of life - managers, salespeople, students, parents, lawyers, and diplomats - how to become better negotiators. Over the years, Ury has discovered that the greatest obstacle to successful agreements and satisfying relationships is not the other side, as difficult as they can be.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • WIN,WIN,WIN!

  • By Leslie on 05-09-15

So true

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-15

A necessary corrective in the series. The first step in conflict resolution cum management is dealing with ourselves so we have that much more awareness of the needs of others.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Antichrists

  • By: Mark A. Roeder
  • Narrated by: Bryant Sullivan
  • Length: 9 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 67
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 63
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 64

Elijah has a dream - to follow in the footsteps of his brothers and make the VHS football team. But, for Elijah it's an uphill battle. Unlike his tall, muscular brothers, Elijah is small and weak, but he pushes on, determined to realize his dream. Elijah's faith is a source of comfort and strength, but when his new pastor begins to preach out against gays, Elijah feels increasingly unwelcome. While his church seems increasingly un-Christian, Elijah is exposed to the gay boys of Verona - boys who care about each other and reach out to those in need.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • apocryphal

  • By BryinSiam on 08-25-14

apocryphal

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-25-14

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Yes, the story makes a point. Can we be Christians without being black and white on issues? Why do we need a whipping boy or an external enemy (measuring post of our orthodoxy) in order to feel validated as Christians? Are we saved by grace or not?

If you’ve listened to books by Mark A. Roeder before, how does this one compare?

No.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

I had to listen at 1.5 speed.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

No because it is too polemical and the characters aren't rounded.

Any additional comments?

Regarding the issue of choice: Who wants to be gay? Who wants to be bullied and abused? Who doesn't wish they were 'normal' and could be and have all the same things as 'normal' people? On the other hand, Why is coming out so traumatic? Why doesn't it really resolve the internal struggle? Society may say it is open but it isn't: there remains much for minorities of all types to fear.

I wonder if the biblical side of this issue was really addressed through the appearances of the Jesus character? Maybe but I really do wonder what would Jesus say or do with this issue in person.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • A Life of Unlearning

  • One Man's Journey to Find the Truth
  • By: Anthony Venn-Brown
  • Narrated by: David Tredinnick
  • Length: 12 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 100
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 69

This is a story about living your truth, embracing who you are and living the life you were meant to live. Whether you're gay or straight, a Christian or a non believer, you'll find relevance in Anthony's tale.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Inspiring

  • By David on 11-24-06

Careful what you wish for

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-14

Would you try another book from Anthony Venn-Brown and/or David Tredinnick?

Yes.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

Underlying themes important to me were: 1. Real selfless caring behaviours were demonstrated by the AIDS Support groups because they were with the sufferers. 2. Forgiveness is needed by all but it is costly to those who have been hurt. 3. Trashing one's marriage, family and community isn't a great job reference.

What does David Tredinnick bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Be prepared for an Aussie accent. The narrator makes the book.

What character would you cut from A Life of Unlearning?

I've heard it said in several films lately, "Leave God out of this." The title is a non sequitur: the author should have instead titled it, "Be careful what you wish for: One Man's Journey to Find the Truth"

Any additional comments?

This is a good example of how in the telling of a story, the principles being argued get justified. Just because we desire something doesn't make it the right choice. The message I get from Venn-Brown is that desires trump promises, which ironically fly in the face of his demand for honesty from others. I can't help but want to read a book from the perspective of the wife he abandoned.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Eichmann in Jerusalem

  • A Report on the Banality of Evil
  • By: Hannah Arendt
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 392
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 352
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 350

Sparking a flurry of heated debate, Hannah Arendt's authoritative and stunning report on the trial of German Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann first appeared in The New Yorker in 1963. This revised edition includes material that came to light after the trial, as well as Arendt's postscript. A major journalistic triumph by an intellectual of singular influence, Eichmann in Jerusalem is as shocking as it is informative - an unflinching look at one of the most unsettling (and unsettled) issues of the 20th century.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lest we forget the banality of evil

  • By BryinSiam on 08-03-14

Lest we forget the banality of evil

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-14

Hannah Arendt, the author, was a courageous woman with an incisive mind. I have been weary of accounts of the Nazis but this book (and related film) provide a timeless, dispassionate accounting and analysis of the slaughter of millions of souls. Should we think we've left that gruesome history behind us, the author provides an inadvertent reminder that the very same evil lurks at the heart of every risk-averse yet ambitious network of bureaucrats. Alas, we've already forgotten.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Tyndale's Bible: Saint Matthew's Gospel

  • Read in the Original Pronunciation by David Crystal
  • By: William Tyndale
  • Narrated by: David Crystal
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 15

What was so special about the Tyndale Bible? How does it sound to us today? The first text of the Bible to be printed in English was the New Testament of William Tyndale, published in 1525-6. Its repercussions lasted for almost a century, stimulated by the religious intolerances of the age, and Tyndale's influence can be seen in most of the Bible translations over the next 100 years, not least in the language of the King James Bible of 1611 - as this recording of Saint Matthew’s Gospel in the pronunciation of Tyndale’s own time makes vividly clear.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I only wish it was the full Bible

  • By e.good on 01-17-17

Performance that draws one on

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-27-14

What made the experience of listening to Tyndale's Bible: Saint Matthew's Gospel the most enjoyable?

The narrator capture the original pronunciations. His reading was impeccable.

What did you like best about this story?

The staunge tongue drew one along.

Have you listened to any of David Crystal’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, but now shall look for more.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Familiar and yet not... watch, you'll be spellbound.

Any additional comments?

Like a parable. You'll find yourself thinking about the message because you've heard it.