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  • reviews
  • 34
  • helpful votes
  • 208
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  • Girls & Boys

  • By: Dennis Kelly
  • Narrated by: Carey Mulligan
  • Length: 1 hr and 46 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,511
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,114
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,070

A pulse-pounding new play from Tony Award-winning® playwright Dennis Kelly takes you on a journey that is at once hilarious, gripping, and heartbreaking. This world-premiere production starring Carey Mulligan (The Great Gatsby, An Education) is available exclusively on Audible after a celebrated run at the Royal Court Theatre in London and off-Broadway at the Minetta Lane Theatre. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I have never heard a story performed so well.

  • By Erin Reeve on 07-05-18

Wow. Just . . . wow.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-16-18

Carey Mulligan is incredible. Her talent shines blindingly throughout this performance. I can scarcely imagine what it must be like to watch her perform this play on stage.

Yes, the subject matter is sometimes dark, but that’s not the overall point of the play, and not the focus of this performance. Despite some of the stark and bleak details, this is an audiobook I will listen to again and again...if nothing else, for the pure pleasure of hearing Carey Mulligan demonstrate her wide-ranging talents. (Sally Sparrow - you are BRILLIANT, and I wish the rain would never stop.)

I didn’t expect a less-than-two-hours audiobook to be so thought-provoking and stay with me so long. The playwright has a genius for natural conversational rhythms and the way we talk to ourselves inside our heads.

Highly recommend. I’d rate it higher than five stars if I could.

30 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • I'm Thinking of Ending Things

  • By: Iain Reid
  • Narrated by: Candace Thaxton
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 647
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 598
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 599

In this deeply scary and intensely unnerving debut novel, Jake and a woman known only as "The Girlfriend" are on a drive to visit his parents at their secluded farm. But when Jake leaves "The Girlfriend" stranded at an abandoned high school, what follows is a twisted unraveling of the darkest unease, an exploration into psychological frailty, and an ending as suspenseful as The Usual Suspects and as haunting as Misery.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a ride! This is a must read!

  • By Elizabeth on 06-15-16

Not as impressive as I’d hoped

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-18

Based on the other reviews, I was optimistic. I don’t usually get short books (under 10 hours) and now I remember why. There’s only so much an author can do in 225 pages. While this story started out as promising, the ending was NOT a huge surprise, and made the story fall to the ground with a thud. It has good “creep factor” but then takes it overboard. You know from the start there’s weird sh** going down because there’s no way real people would behave this way, so clearly something is rotten in the state of (mind) Denmark, but the clues are delivered with such heavy-handedness you start to feel like you’re being smacked in the head with them.

I chose the book because another reviewer said it was a good “mindf**k book” which is just my cup of tea; however, I’d call it more of a “mindcuddle” book. Makes you think for a bit and provides brief entertainment, but that’s all.

  • The Old Man

  • By: Thomas Perry
  • Narrated by: Peter Berkrot
  • Length: 11 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,757
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,742

To all appearances, Dan Chase is a harmless retiree in Vermont with two big mutts and a grown daughter he keeps in touch with by phone. But most 60-year-old widowers don't have multiple driver's licenses, savings stockpiled in banks across the country, and a bugout kit with two Beretta Nanos stashed in the spare bedroom closet. Most have not spent decades on the run.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The 'old man' is not old!

  • By Wayne on 08-15-17

Ugh please let this end soon!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-08-18

I usually like Thomas Perry a lot. The Butcher’s Boy series was great. This one, though, dragged on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on and on (repeat ad nauseam... literally). Where was his editor? So much extraneous detail that added NOTHING to the plot or development of any characters. The story was not believable even though I willingly suspended my disbelief as hard as I could (think Trevanian without any intellectual appeal; or maybe a B grade action movie without any fun). The characters were not likable or even care-about-able. My mind rarely wanders while listening to a book, but during this one, it went on frequent journeys to anywhere else more interesting (e.g., wondering how full the lint filter in the dryer was).

The narrator was so bad it became comical, which is pretty much the only reason I listened all the way to the tedious, implausible, made-for-tv end. I actually laughed out loud at some of the “serious” scenes due to the narrator’s horrible, horrible job. (And where was HIS editor, too?) My favorite was his pronunciation of the short “a” sound (cat, apple, pan)... as if he were grinning broadly with his teeth clamped together and inserting a diphthong “ee” at the beginning of the word: “kee-yat,” “ee-yapple,” “pee-yan.” Genuinely funny in places (especially in scenes not intended to be funny). I wonder if someone bribed him to see how bad a job he could do and still get hired. And his accent was not consistent, which would have been tolerable at least, but ranged from poorly done Midwestern to poorly done Southern to poorly done Canadian to poorly done Libyan and several others not even worth identifying. He’s now on my very short list of narrators who, when I see their names, will automatically disqualify the book for me. I agree with the other reviewers who said he can’t do female voices and sounds like a sinister Lego Batman, except the latter might be insulting to said Lego Batman.

This book makes me grateful for audible’s return policy. What a disappointing purchase. I truly don’t understand how so many reviewers loved it.

  • The Mistake

  • By: K. L. Slater
  • Narrated by: Lucy Price-Lewis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,883
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,629
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,626

You think you know the truth about the people you love. But one discovery can change everything.... Eight-year-old Billy goes missing one day, out flying his kite with his sister Rose. Two days later he is found dead. Sixteen years on, Rose still blames herself for Billy's death. How could she have failed to protect her little brother? Rose has never fully recovered from the trauma, and one of the few people she trusts is her neighbour Ronnie, who she has known all her life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How much do we really know about the ones we love?

  • By T. West on 12-03-17

UGH - melodramatic tripe - no thanks!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-18

Perhaps if ANY of the characters were believable, then maybe the melodrama wouldn't be so bad. I don't remember the last time I rolled my eyes so frequently while listening to a book. A few times I even groaned in exasperation at the idiocy of the characters and the lack of talent of the author. I mainly chose this book because Lucy Price-Lewis is one of my favorite narrators, and the book is in the mystery/thriller category I usually enjoy. True to form, Lucy did a great job - but even she can only read what the author has written, and NOBODY can turn this sow's ear into a silk purse. Not sure I’ll try anything else by this author.

I'm a big fan of "the willing suspension of disbelief” when listening to fiction - but there MUST be limits somewhere! The narrator (both at age 18 and also 16 years later) was unbelievably naïve, weak, just plain stupid sometimes; and even after 16 years had passed since "the events of that horrible time" she hadn't matured an ounce. The characters were all just caricatures: Gareth-the-controlling-jerk, Cassie-the-outspoken-and-brash-but-with-heart-of-gold-best-friend, Dad-the-overprotective-and-blind-to-his-daughter's-activities-father, the elderly-and-kindly-but-nosy-small-town-neighbors, the list just goes on and on. And – pet peeve – why switch from 1st person to 3rd person when Rose is the one narrating both the past and present storylines? That was very distracting (and annoying). Does the author think we’re not smart enough to follow past vs. present if she uses the same voice? Really? Even though each chapter starts with “Rose: present day” or “Rose: 16 years earlier”? Come on.

There was insufficient development of Rose's early relationship with Gareth to explain his appeal – we saw nothing in her first 18 years would have led her into a destructive relationship like that. The description of her bulimia and the motivations behind it made no sense (e.g., why did she hear Gareth's voice calling her fat and ugly, when at his worst he called her stupid or a “b”? I only ever heard him compliment her appearance, although that was creepy by itself). And while bulimia might be a normal short-term PTSD response as a way for Rose to regain control back then, why would it continue or resume 16 years later? Why would finding Billy's blanket cause her to fall apart so completely? And what ever came from the council's inspection of her library? Will they close it down & she'll have to move to a new town (the thought of which sends her into an inexplicable panic); or let it stay open? After making such a big deal of the upcoming library inspection and how it went, why drop that storyline completely? But...I don't actually care if the library stays open or not. I don't actually care about anyone in the town. The author completely failed to pull me in. Sure, some bad things happened, and those things sucked, and some people had trouble getting past them, and ….blah blah blah, I’m already boring myself. I don’t often send a book back for a refund, but this one I did. Yuck. It isn’t even good beach reading. At best, it’s a low-budget B movie on Lifetime, which I would have turned off at the first commercial.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Into the Darkest Corner

  • By: Elizabeth Haynes
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe, Karen Cass
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,333
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,037
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,036

Catherine has been enjoying the single life for long enough to know a good catch when she sees one. Gorgeous, charismatic, spontaneous – Lee seems almost too perfect to be true. And her friends clearly agree, as each in turn falls under his spell. But there is a darker side to Lee. His erratic, controlling and sometimes frightening behaviour means that Catherine is increasingly isolated. Driven into the darkest corner of her world, and trusting no one, she plans a meticulous escape.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • AN OCD IS STALKED BY A PSYCHOPATH

  • By Betty on 06-05-12

So much better than I expected!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-18

Fantastic character development. The fast switches from past to present were easy to follow. I was so proud of the main character’s gradual progression out of her OCD prison, and fascinated by her “checking” routines in the beginning.
I’d have liked to know more about Lee’s past, and Sylvia’s story from “then” to “now” — but it didn’t really matter for understanding and enjoying the book.
Will be eagerly looking for more by this author!

  • A Bachelor Establishment

  • By: Jodi Taylor
  • Narrated by: Anna Bentinck
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,612
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,489
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,486

High adventure and dark mystery combine in a sparkling historical romance, by Jodi Taylor writing as Isabella Barclay from The Chronicles of St. Mary's. Bascombe, widowed and tied to an impoverished estate, has learned to ask little of life. With no hope of leaving, the years have passed her by. Lord Ryde, exiled abroad after a scandal, has returned to strip his estate and make a new start in America.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A clever and well-plotted Regency Romance

  • By Hope on 09-17-15

Another winner!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-18

I’ve never read anything by Jodi Taylor I didn’t love. Her dialogue is simultaneously hilarious and touching. Her characters are human and endearing. Her plots often include unlikely coincidences and “happily ever after,” but she makes you WANT the happy ending!

My only disappointment in this book is that it was too short. I didn’t want it to end. Maybe there will be a sequel, although the story didn’t end with any unanswered questions, so no sequel is needed (but would be greatly welcomed).

I’m accustomed to narrator Zora Ramm for Jodi Taylor’s novels, but Anna Bentinck does a fine job too. In fact they sound a little alike, although Zora does a better job with male voices, and Anna’s female lead was a little breathless sometimes.

But nonetheless, five stars all around!

  • Term Limits

  • By: Vince Flynn
  • Narrated by: Nick Sullivan
  • Length: 15 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,670
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,170
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,162

In one bloody night, three of Washington’s most powerful politicians are executed with surgical precision. Their assassins then deliver a shocking ultimatum to the American government: set aside partisan politics and restore power to the people. No one, they warn, is out of their reach—not even the president. A joint FBI-CIA task force reveals the killers are elite military commandos, but no one knows exactly who they are or when they will strike next.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Term Limits

  • By David Share on 06-26-11

HUGE WASTE OF A CREDIT OR CASH

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-16

I never, ever, EVER fail to finish a book I start.
Until now.
This was so tedious, and so uninteresting, and so contrived (the story, the dialogue, the overall writing) that I simply couldn't make myself do it.
The characters are not real.
The plot is not believable even if you willingly suspend your disbelief.
I just don't care how it ends.
In fact, I'm looking into whether I can send it back and get a refund...which is something else I almost never do.

  • Timbuktu

  • By: Paul Auster
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 5 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 494
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 414
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 418

Mr. Bones, the canine hero of this astonishing book, is the sidekick and confidant of Willy G. Christmas, a brilliant and troubled homeless man from Brooklyn. As Willy's body slowly expires, he sets off with Mr. Bones for Baltimore in search of his high-school English teacher and a new home for his companion. Mr. Bones is our witness during their journey, and out of his thoughts, Paul Auster has spun one of the richest, most compelling tales in American fiction.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Should I Have Said Gehrig?

  • By Dubi on 11-10-14

SAD SAD SAD!!! Not uplifting as I'd hoped.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-15

The writing was good, the few characters strongly developed (although depressing), the perspective from dog's-eye-view was powerful and worked well - but DANG I cried and cried all throughout this book. AND I REALLY HATED THE ENDING. But the narration was masterful - possibly why it made me cry so much.

If you don't like lengthy philosophical rambling soliloquies about lifetheuniverseandeverything, you probably will not enjoy this book.

If you have a super-soft spot for dogs, you will not enjoy several parts of this book.

If you think it's silly for a book to be narrated by a dog, you will HATE this book. (But to you I say: why not let the dog narrate? Dogs are so much nicer, kinder, and more sensitive and loyal than people anyway.)

The book made me think while I was listening to it, but overall it was just too sad for me.

  • The President's Pilot

  • By: Robert Gandt
  • Narrated by: Thomas Block
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 772
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 702
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 691

A year and a half into her first term as President of the United States, Libby Paulsen is in a world of trouble. Her controversial agenda has placed her in a doomsday clash with a right wing cabal led by an enigmatic Air Force general. The conspirators will stop at nothing - including assassination - to remove Libby Paulsen from office. When the cabal targets Air Force One, Libby's Presidency - and her life - rest in the hands of a maverick pilot named Pete Brand, a man with whom the President shares a long-smoldering secret.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Is everyone drunk?

  • By Mike on 02-06-15

Truly HORRIBLE audio book - but such fun to review!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-15

This was a subpar novel, with an astonishingly bad narration. The other reviewers who talk about the narrator sounding drunk are spot on, but that's not all. The more I listened, the more it was with horrified fascination, like listening to a train wreck in slow motion....then it became a kind of project for me, as I started actually WRITING DOWN every word he swallowed or mispronounced (which is something I have never ever EVER done before while listening to a book).

Some notable examples of his pronunciation, and I swear I am not making these up, are these:
* squander (instead of squadron)
* nucular (instead of nuclear)
* huncho (instead of honcho)
* wavelennth (instead of wavelength)
* strennth (instead of strength)
* pinnata (instead of piñata)
* true (instead of through)
* dat (instead of that)
* duh (instead of the)

I speculate that narrator Thomas Block either has a speech impediment, has bad teeth or bad dentures, or perhaps (and most likely) had recently undergone dental surgery from which the anesthesia had not yet worn off when he recorded this reading. I will NEVER intentionally listen to anything narrated by him, and I caution all of you to beware.

Now for the story itself....as I said, subpar. The characters were shallow and unformed. I couldn't easily tell who was a good guy or a bad guy most of the time, and I just didn't care anyway. When certain key characters were killed (always shot by one of the definite bad guys, who were mere caricatures of villains, by the way), I just shrugged. There was nothing in ANY of the characters (including the four or five main leads!) to connect to emotionally or intellectually. The concept was good - "the US government is being threatened from within by a secret cadre of way-far-right-wing-nut-jobs, and the loyal American citizens are fighting valiantly to protect their great country and the freedom it represents" - but the execution of that concept here fell so flat it wouldn't even cause a ripple under the rug.

Don't even get me started on Libby, the woman president/main character, who came off as a self-centered, lonely, whiny WUSS of a gal (making all of us women look bad by association), living in a sham marriage and pining over her ex-lover, exhibiting no military skills or leadership ability, other than her inexplicable but near-magical talent to charm audiences (primarily men, of course). [And actually, now that I think of it, maybe that would have been a better way to go....make her a MAGICAL woman president, whose training and education (no doubt at Hogwarts) enabled her to cast a massive "confundus charm" over the American voters! I would have bought that storyline way more easily than the actual one.]

Libby's friend/staffer Jill came across as an ever-unpleasant Dunhill-smoking political-ladder-climbing back-stabbing two-dimensional cartoon, best described with oft-hyphenated multi-word phrases (OK, maybe that was overboard, sorry).

And don't forget about Pete, the male lead/love interest (also two-dimensional), and Sam, the low level military employee whose ingenuity saves the lives of everyone on Air Force One (and by the way Sam is the ONLY character I liked in this book), and several other people who either don't matter to the story, or you don't KNOW if they matter to the story, or you just don't CARE about the story enough to think about it.

On the plus side, there were some fast action-packed scenes that would play well on a movie screen, but if this were made into a movie it would be a B movie at best, and I probably wouldn't go see it.

I don't normally write reviews. I think this is only the third review I have ever submitted, after 15+ years of listening to literally hundreds of audiobooks. But this audiobook was so awful I felt compelled to take the time to describe it.

  • The Shifting Fog [also published under the alternate title The House at Riverton]

  • By: Kate Morton
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lee
  • Length: 18 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 825
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 740
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 739

Summer 1924: On the eve of a glittering society party, by the lake of a grand English country house, a young poet takes his life. The only witnesses, sisters Hannah and Emmeline Hartford, will never speak to each other again. Winter 1999: Grace Bradley, 98, one-time housemaid of Riverton Manor, is visited by a young director making a film about the poet's suicide. Ghosts awaken and memories, long consigned to the dark reaches of Grace's mind, begin to sneak back through the cracks.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Alternate title for "The House at Riverton"

  • By Karen on 12-22-13

Ugggghhhhhhh.....get a different narrator!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-15

I read the reviews about the narrator's accent being Australian instead of British, but I mistakenly thought that wouldn't bother me. I was wrong! Not only is her Australian accent annoyingly inappropriate for the story, it is incredibly grating on the ears, as are her loud inhalations between sentences. No one should need to pause then breathe loudly that frequently. I am only one hour into the book but am honestly not sure if I will be able to finish it - and I almost NEVER stop listening to a book before the end.
Unfortunately, I don't know if the story itself is any good, because I can't concentrate on anything but how awful the narration is.