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David S.

  • 4
  • reviews
  • 10
  • helpful votes
  • 5
  • ratings
  • True Allegiance

  • By: Ben Shapiro
  • Narrated by: Millian Quinteros
  • Length: 7 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 413
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 387
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 387

America is coming apart. An illegal immigration crisis has broken out along America's Southern border, there are race riots in Detroit, a fiery female rancher-turned-militia leader has vowed revenge on the president for his arrogant policies, and the world's most notorious terrorist is planning a massive attack that could destroy the United States as we know it. Meanwhile the president is too consumed by legacy-seeking to see our country's deep peril.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story; horrible narrator

  • By Christopher on 10-24-16

Poor narration

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-16

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

The narration of this audio book is hard to listen to. It was difficult to stay focused on the story because the narration was annoying. Also, I would encourage the narrator to look up the pronunciation of town names before recording the story.

  • 400 Things Cops Know: Street-Smart Lessons From a Veteran Patrolman

  • By: Adam Plantinga
  • Narrated by: Mark Boyett
  • Length: 7 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,812
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,626
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,623

400 Things Cops Know shows police work on the inside, from the viewpoint of the regular cop on the beat - a profession that can range from rewarding to bizarre to terrifying, all within the course of an eight-hour shift. Written by veteran police sergeant Adam Plantinga, 400 Things Cops Know brings the listener into life the way cops experience it - a life of danger, frustration, occasional triumph, and plenty of grindingly hard routine work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Thank you, Adam Plantinga!

  • By Alexis Ward on 05-30-16

Enlightening and entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-16

What did you love best about 400 Things Cops Know: Street-Smart Lessons From a Veteran Patrolman?

99% of this book is interesting and entertaining. The only exceptions to this are the gritty and seamy examples of the dark side of life that cops are constantly exposed to. When not discussing the despairing side of life, the author shares many enlightening insights and made me laugh often. Having never been a policeman, I especially enjoyed how cops protect themselves by "reading" situations and people.

Which character – as performed by Mark Boyett – was your favorite?

Excellent narration. The only obvious mistake I noticed was his pronunciation of "Present Arms" during a funeral. It shouldn't be pronounced like a "Christmas Present", but rather the first syllable is stressed, as when you are "Presented" an award.

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • The Second World War

  • By: Antony Beevor
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 39 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 783
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 705
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 703

Over the past two decades, Antony Beevor has established himself as one of the world's premier historians of World War II. His multi-award winning books have included Stalingrad and The Fall of Berlin 1945. Now, in his newest and most ambitious book, he turns his focus to one of the bloodiest and most tragic events of the twentieth century, The Second World War. Thrillingly written and brilliantly researched, Beevor's provocative account is destined to become the definitive work on World War II.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It Fills in Gaps I Didn't Know Existed

  • By DJM on 07-31-12

Just Too Dry

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-16

What would have made The Second World War better?

I'm a big WWII history buff, and have listened to many good titles of this genre, but this book could not hold my interest. Overall, Mr. Beevor prefers to concentrate his writing on relating the driest of facts: Unit numbers, commanding officer names, direction of attack, strategies from the highest levels, etc., but omits most anything of the human interest side of history. When my attention began flagging while listening to some early war history surrounding Russia and Finland, I thought, "Let me skip ahead to something more interesting, like Pearl Harbor." It didn't improve my opinion. Sorry, but I found this book to be extremely dull. The one bright spot was the narrator--he is a masterful reader.

Has The Second World War turned you off from other books in this genre?

Not at all--I greatly enjoy history--just not this kind of recitation of facts and figures.

  • The First Heroes

  • The Extraordinary Story of the Doolittle Raid
  • By: Craig Nelson
  • Narrated by: Raymond Todd
  • Length: 17 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 62
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65

Immediately after Japan's December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt sought to restore the honor of the United States with a dramatic act of vengeance: a retaliatory bombing raid on Tokyo itself. In those early days of World War II, America was ill-prepared for any sort of warfare. But FDR was not to be dissuaded, and at his bidding a squadron of scarcely trained army fliers, led by the famous daredevil Jimmy Doolittle, set forth on what everyone regarded as a suicide mission.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Heroic Attempt

  • By William on 07-20-04

Stay away from this one

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-14

Would you try another book from Craig Nelson and/or Raymond Todd?

Do yourself a favor and stay away from this audio book. The author was clearly out of his league in attempting to write about anything related to aviation, and the narrator makes it even worse. The factual errors and mispronunciations left me laughing and cringing at the same time. The author takes deep excursions into subjects that are so far from the Doolittle Raid, you wonder if you have accidentally downloaded the wrong book. Sorry to be so harsh, but other readers/listeners need to be warned not to waste your money on this one. The books by Carroll V. Glines are the best ever written on the Raid. His work was so valuable, they made him an honorary member of the Raiders. Read his books if you can.