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Jeff and Tonya

Jacksonville, FL
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  • The Greatest Love Story Ever Told

  • An Oral History
  • By: Megan Mullally, Nick Offerman
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman, Megan Mullally
  • Length: 6 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,062
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,887
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,876

At last, the full story behind Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman's epic romance, including stories, portraits, and the occasional puzzle. How did they do it? They came from completely different families, endured a significant age difference, and were separated by the gulf of several social strata. Megan loved books and art history; Nick loved hammers. But much more than these seemingly unsurpassable obstacles were the values they held in common: respect, decency, the ability to mention genitalia in almost any context, and an abiding obsession with the songs of Tom Waits.   

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect comedy memoir audiobook

  • By Ruthi on 10-03-18

Greatest? Maybe. Most Hilarious? Quite Possibly.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

What happens when you get two very busy comics who each have one breakout role on television and who happen to be married to each other get together to discuss their nearly two decade long relationship? Hilariousness ensues, that's what. They get into controversial topics from time to time, and this is definetly not a book you want to listen to with kids around (and you need to actually listen to this one, rather than read it, even if you know their voices precisely... which would be kind of creepy anyway... moving on...), as there is a fair amount of... colorful... language used (though nothing XXX rated, just to be clear). Overall, a truly hilarious tale about their lives together and their thoughts on relationships, fashion, celebrity, and all kinds of other things. I actually got my Closer badge on Audible with this book, thanks to a 6 hr drive - and it is absolutely worth reading in one sitting. :)

  • Born with Teeth

  • A Memoir
  • By: Kate Mulgrew
  • Narrated by: Kate Mulgrew
  • Length: 10 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,117
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,921
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,908

Audie Award, Narration by Author, 2016. Raised by unconventional Irish Catholics who knew "how to drink, how to dance, how to talk, and how to stir up the devil", Kate Mulgrew grew up with poetry and drama in her bones. But in her mother, a would-be artist burdened by the endless arrival of new babies, young Kate saw the consequences of a dream deferred.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful Memoir

  • By Jasmine on 07-23-15

Interesting, But Flaky

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

In this memoir, Kate Mulgrew - known best, depending on age and interest, for 70s era show Ryan's Hope, 90s era show Star Trek: Voyager, or 2010s era show Orange Is The New Black - describes her life from being literally born with teeth up until around the turn of the Millenium, when she was still filming Voyager.

And she does a remarkable job of keeping the reader interested in what happens next. Her prose has the qualities of the poet she once wanted to be.

But she plays with the timeline too much, often skipping around or losing threads entirely, only to pick them up later with no explanation. And what she makes seem in the book as merely days in some cases appears to have actually been years.

But the biggest sin, and the reason this 2015 memoir feels incomplete, is the abrupt ending. Wherein she sets up a particular meeting that had been years in the making... and then ends with a literal closed door, never revealing anything beyond the moment she stepped into that particular room.

  • One Nation Under God

  • How Corporate America Invented Christian America
  • By: Kevin M. Kruse
  • Narrated by: Jeff Cummings
  • Length: 12 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 477
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 416

Conventional wisdom holds that America has been a Christian nation since the Founding Fathers. But in One Nation Under God, historian Kevin M. Kruse argues that the idea of "Christian America" is nothing more than a myth - and a relatively recent one at that.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Chawks on 05-06-15

Intriguing But Incomplete.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

The central premise of this book is that "Under God" and "In God We Trust" were created by a cabal of corporate and religious interests opposed to the New Deal in the 1930s, and indeed the roughly 30 year period from the mid 1930s through the mid 1960s is where the bulk of the text concentrates. For example, the 30 year period from 1980 - 2010 is encompassed only in the epilogue, the 2nd shortest of the chapters of this book, and the period before the mid 1930s is barely mentioned at all. And therein lies where the book is incomplete. It should have built the case that pre-New Deal, religious references were scant in American politics. I believe that case can be made, based on my own knowledge of the history, but I'd like to see the efforts of a more trained historian on the matter. Instead, Kruse zeroes in on the New Deal opponents. But within the framework that he creates, he actually does do a solid job of showing how their efforts led to the increased religiosity of the Eisenhower Administration and from there directly to the Culture Wars as we know them now - though Kruse never uses the term "Culture Wars". Even with my own better than average knowledge of the relevant events, I learned quite a bit here and had at least a few attitudes shifted. Highly recommended reading for anyone actually interested in the subject from any side of the issue.

  • Talking as Fast as I Can

  • From Gilmore Girls to Gilmore Girls (and Everything in Between)
  • By: Lauren Graham
  • Narrated by: Lauren Graham
  • Length: 4 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,665
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,773
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,704

In her first work of nonfiction, the beloved star of Gilmore Girls and Parenthood recounts her experiences on Gilmore Girls - the first and second times - and shares stories about life, love, and working in Hollywood. This collection of essays is written in the intimate, hilarious, and down-to-earth voice that made her novel, Someday, Someday, Maybe, a New York Times best seller.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Talking as Fast as I Can

  • By NO SPIN on 12-02-16

Fast and Funny

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

In this memoir, Graham talks about her life in general and some of her more famous/ long-lasting projects: Gilmore Girls and Parenthood. And she does it in what seems to be her style on the shows - fast and hilarious. The chapters are short, and the book overall is a very quick read. If you've ever seen any of her projects at all, this is a very worthy read. And if you haven't, you're probably not interested in this book anyway - but if you haven't seen any of her work and *are* interested, go ahead and pick this up. If nothing else, you will be entertained.

  • Apollo 8

  • The Thrilling Story of the First Mission to the Moon
  • By: Jeffrey Kluger
  • Narrated by: Brian Troxell
  • Length: 11 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,109
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,037
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,037

In August 1968 NASA made a bold decision: In just 16 weeks, the United States would launch humankind's first flight to the moon. Only the year before, three astronauts had burned to death in their spacecraft, and since then the Apollo program had suffered one setback after another. Meanwhile, the Russians were winning the space race, the Cold War was getting hotter by the month, and President Kennedy's promise to put a man on the moon by the end of the decade seemed sure to be broken.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous Book

  • By Jack Mueller on 06-24-17

Accurate Subtitle.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

Kluger does an excellent job with writing the narrative of this distinctively NON-fiction story with the skill of a solid thriller author. While Apollo 11 would eventually overpower 8, and one of 8's crewmen would become far more famous for Apollo 13, neither of those missions happens without someone being the first to actually get to lunar orbit and make sure their spacecraft can survive the trip. And Kluger does an excellent job of revealing all of the people invovled and putting them in the proper context while showing both the very real perils and how the various people handled those perils. If you're interested in man leaving the planet at all, this is a must read book.

  • NeuroTribes

  • The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
  • By: Steve Silberman
  • Narrated by: William Hughes
  • Length: 18 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,532
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,379
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,375

What is autism: a lifelong disability or a naturally occurring form of cognitive difference akin to certain forms of genius? In truth, it is both of these things and more - and the future of our society depends on our understanding it. Wired reporter Steve Silberman unearths the secret history of autism, long suppressed by the same clinicians who became famous for discovering it, and finds surprising answers to the crucial question of why the number of diagnoses has soared in recent years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good Contrast to "In a Different Key"

  • By Gadget on 06-01-16

Mostly History with a dash of future.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

I am Autistic, and this look at the history of my people was more fascinating and horrifying than even I already knew. In this book, Silberman shows several people from history that were fairly clearly Autistic, progressing from early accounts to newest and from there into the histories of the two men that "co-discovered" Autism in the 20th century. The vast bulk of the book is spent inside the 20th century, with only the last chapter or two in the 21st, but even then it truly is fascinating and horrifying. Absolutely recommended for all, particularly those with Autistics in their lives.

  • The Signal and the Noise

  • Why So Many Predictions Fail - but Some Don't
  • By: Nate Silver
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 15 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,819
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,273
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,255

Nate Silver built an innovative system for predicting baseball performance, predicted the 2008 election within a hair’s breadth, and became a national sensation as a blogger - all by the time he was 30. The New York Times now publishes FiveThirtyEight.com, where Silver is one of the nation’s most influential political forecasters. Drawing on his own groundbreaking work, Silver examines the world of prediction, investigating how we can distinguish a true signal from a universe of noisy data.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Learn About Statistics Without All The Math

  • By Scott Fabel on 03-09-13

Solid Application of Statistics.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-15-19

I'm a math geek who has casually followed Silver's work since he came on the national radar after the 2008 Presidential election. In this book, he uses his own mathematical background and many interviews to show how probabilistic statistics (vs more deterministic statistics) gives us great insight into a wide range of issues, from the mundane yet popular topics of poker and baseball - things he has personal experience with using statistics on - to the seemingly more substantial issues including weather forecasting, political polling, climate change and even terrorism. And overall, he is very careful to stick to his central point: follow the numbers, no matter where they lead - which he calls the "signal". Very highly recommended for anyone trying to have a genuine discussion on really almost any topic.

  • Love, Loss, and What We Ate

  • A Memoir
  • By: Padma Lakshmi
  • Narrated by: Padma Lakshmi
  • Length: 12 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 620
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 575
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 576

A vivid memoir of food and family, survival and triumph, Love, Loss, and What We Ate traces the arc of Padma Lakshmi's unlikely path from an immigrant childhood to a complicated life in front of the camera - a tantalizing blend of Ruth Reichl's Tender at the Bone and Nora Ephron's Heartburn.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Touching, Deep, Surprising, and Inspiring

  • By Aishwaryame on 08-18-16

Mesmerizing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-19

I only knew of Padma Lakshmi due to her work on Top Chef, but that was enough to get me to buy and eventually read this book. In it, she paints the story of her life beautifully, even during the worst of tragedies. This is a very well told autobiography, even if you've never heard of her before. Very highly recommended.

  • Endurance

  • A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery
  • By: Scott Kelly
  • Narrated by: Scott Kelly
  • Length: 13 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,057
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 2,055

A stunning memoir from the astronaut who spent a record-breaking year aboard the International Space Station - a candid account of his remarkable voyage, of the journeys off the planet that preceded it, and of his colorful formative years. A natural storyteller and modern-day hero, Kelly has a message of hope for the future that will inspire for generations to come. Here, in his personal story, we see the triumph of the human imagination, the strength of the human will, and the boundless wonder of the galaxy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well told, in depth account of life on the ISS

  • By Lili on 11-16-17

Simply Phenomenal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-19

Told in alternating chapters detailing his Year in Space and the rest of his life leading up to that mission, Kelly does an awesome job of telling his story in a way that makes it very nearly impossible to put down the book. I actually listened to the audiobook for most of this read, which was read by Kelly himself. Also fun was knowing I had followed him on social media during that year, so some of the things he talks about in the book, I actually saw when his team put them on his social media accounts as they happened. Overall an excellent book about the current realities of the International Space Station and at least one man's tale of how he got there.

  • The Djinn

  • By: J. Kent Holloway
  • Narrated by: Wayne Farrell
  • Length: 7 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 124
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 109
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 111

In the final years of the first Kingdom of Jerusalem, in a vault, hidden deep beneath the Temple Mount, Baron Gregory De L'Ombre has made an astonishing discovery. Imprisoned within the vault are twelve monstrous abominations, created by one of King Solomon's wives as a final act of revenge. The secrets of the vault will ensure Gregory's absolute power and forever enslave the Outremer-the Holy Land. No man dares stand against him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't stop listening.

  • By Readers Together on 05-10-14

LOVE the story!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-12-18

This is an *awesome* story that almost feels like "Batman during the Crusades".

But this was also the book that proved to me that I just can't consume fiction books in audiobook form. The performance was good, but the stars here explicitly state that 1 is "Not for me", and that is absolutely what this performance was. I've found over the years that I truly love nonfiction audiobooks, but for some reason I just can't do fiction ones. Which is a shame, because this performance was pretty solid, and the story itself is *amazing*.

If you enjoy fiction audiobooks, do yourself a favor and get this one. :)