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Schaeffer Nelson

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 6
  • ratings
  • Lullaby

  • By: Jonathan Maberry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18,488
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,960
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 16,970

A young couple buys a beautiful house by a picturesque lake in the Catskills, looking to escape the bustle of the city to raise their newborn baby. It is a perfect place for a fresh start. Except that nothing is ever as perfect as it seems. As autumn nights close in around their home, they learn that darkness takes many forms. And sometimes that darkness is hungry. New York Times best-selling author Jonathan Maberry delivers an unsettling Audible Original that will give listeners the Halloween creeps all year round.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Scott Brick Rivals Vincent Price

  • By Forgettable Woman on 10-17-18

Fantastic Ghost Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-18

God, this is good. Scary, heartbreaking, well-performed, elegant. More like this, please, Audible. Gave me chills.

  • Hillbilly Elegy

  • A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
  • By: J. D. Vance
  • Narrated by: J. D. Vance
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39,769
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,774
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35,712

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis - that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over 40 years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enlightening!

  • By Gotta Tellya on 09-11-16

Heavy, Moving Memoir

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-18

A frequently sad, but also moving and funny, story about growing up white and poor in the U.S. I kept hoping it would engage more with how racial privilege unites white people across the class spectrum. But Vance tells his story from his specific vantage point and I respect that.

  • Ozark Tales of Ghosts, Spirits, Hauntings, and Monsters

  • By: W. C. Jameson
  • Narrated by: David Otey
  • Length: 5 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15

Who has not been thrilled and not a little frightened by tales of ghosts, spirits, hauntings, and monsters? Some of the most fascinating accounts come from the dark hollows of the Ozark Mountains. For generations, these scary, mystifying legends have been told around campfires and family gatherings and handed down through the generations. Now, for the first time, the best of these tales have been gathered together and presented in this volume.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • LOVE his stories!

  • By Tracy Patterson on 07-31-17

Delightful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-18

For lovers of the Ozarks, folklore, and especially both, this is an absolute hoot. Fascinating, creepy, funny, and sometimes very sad. Like a history class filtered through a campfire night.

  • How to Kill a City

  • Gentrification, Inequality, and the Fight for the Neighborhood
  • By: Peter Moskowitz
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 9 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 94
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92

The term gentrification has become a buzzword to describe the changes in urban neighborhoods across the country, but we don't realize just how threatening it is. It means more than the arrival of trendy shops, much-maligned hipsters, and expensive lattes. The very future of American cities as vibrant, equitable spaces hangs in the balance. How to Kill a City takes listeners from the kitchen tables of hurting families who can no longer afford their homes to the corporate boardrooms and political backrooms where destructive housing policies are devised.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Snobby Socialist New Yorker Gets Hyperbolic

  • By Marie on 04-12-18

Disturbing, stirring, albeit cursory.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-18

This shook me a bit. Left me with the queasy questions, "Why did I fall in love with my city neighborhood?" "Are those reasons real? Honest? Good?" It's a bit in love with its own thesis, and the analysis feels sometimes skimpy. But the punches that land, they bruise. Important reading.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Making Rent in Bed-Stuy

  • A Memoir of Trying to Make It in New York City
  • By: Brandon Harris
  • Narrated by: Brandon Massey
  • Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 10

A young African American millennial filmmaker's funny, sometimes painful, true-life coming-of-age story of trying to make it in New York City - a chronicle of poverty and wealth, creativity and commerce, struggle and insecurity, and the economic and cultural forces intertwined with "the serious, life-threatening process" of gentrification.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slam dunk memoir

  • By Schaeffer Nelson on 02-20-18

Slam dunk memoir

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-20-18

Moving, funny, cutting, and highly perceptive. A slam dunk hybrid of journalism and memoir. A deeply useful portrait of the fundamentally racist and predatory DNA of gentrification, of America altogether.