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Joshua

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  • 3
  • helpful votes
  • 9
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  • 21 Lessons for the 21st Century

  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,956
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,131
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,089

Yuval Noah Harari's 21 Lessons for the 21st Century is a probing and visionary investigation into today's most urgent issues as we move into the uncharted territory of the future. As technology advances faster than our understanding of it, hacking becomes a tactic of war, and the world feels more polarized than ever, Harari addresses the challenge of navigating life in the face of constant and disorienting change and raises the important questions we need to ask ourselves in order to survive. 

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good stuff, but mostly repeats

  • By Amazon Customer on 09-13-18

I couldn’t finish it

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-30-19

I enjoyed the authors previous books, but this one is just bad. It’s not only incoherent, but it gets many things simply wrong.

It builds large selections based on false premises, such as civilizations are genetically based, and therefore since we are one species, there is only one civilizations. Civilizations are based on shared history and culture and individuals can move from one to another, fully integrating in a generation. This is further extrapolated to mean that nation states are bad because they don’t last forever and we have that one aforementioned civilization. Even further, because nations states are bad and we cannot personally know more than 125 people, any pride in your country is nonsense. This of course is false because patriotism is a pride in association with a national identity, not a collection of personal relationships.

Many more such examples of superficial, specious, backward reasoning meant to justify the author’s obvious ideology of world government. One particularly obnoxious tendency is to on one passage speaking of the need to be wary of more and more powerful government, but then goes on to advocate for an eventual all powerful, AI controlled big brother type government that will make all of life’s decisions for you and make life extremely safe, and intensity dissatisfying.

I would not recommend this book. You can get the same drivel watching leftist pundits

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The World until Yesterday

  • What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?
  • By: Jared Diamond
  • Narrated by: Jay Snyder
  • Length: 18 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 845
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 702
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 706

Most of us take for granted the features of our modern society, from air travel and telecommunications to literacy and obesity. Yet for nearly all of its six million years of existence, human society had none of these things. While the gulf that divides us from our primitive ancestors may seem unbridgeably wide, we can glimpse much of our former lifestyle in those largely traditional societies still or recently in existence.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A visit with our ancient ancestors

  • By BRB on 01-30-13

Very good overall, but with some major flaws

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-02-17

This book makes some outdated claims regarding the discredited Saphir-Worf hypothesis and the impact of salt on health, dedicating significant portions of the book to it. The structure of the book is somewhat rambling, often repeating points made at earlier points in the book. This bing said, it does provide a good overview of the effect of the transition from a hunter-gatherer lifestyle to a modern one

Sapiens audiobook cover art
  • Sapiens

  • A Brief History of Humankind
  • By: Yuval Noah Harari
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 15 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,211
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,212
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,121

One hundred thousand years ago, at least six human species inhabited the Earth. Today there is just one. Us. Homo sapiens. How did our species succeed in the battle for dominance? Why did our foraging ancestors come together to create cities and kingdoms? How did we come to believe in gods, nations, and human rights; to trust money, books, and laws; and to be enslaved by bureaucracy, timetables, and consumerism?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sums it up nicely

  • By Mark on 05-15-15

Liberal apology piece

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-17

This is not a history of human kind, but a rather specious justification of nearly every liberal, politically correct position. Apparently everything in the world is imaginary, and everything is natural, no matter if it simply makes no sense. Many reasons why cultural institutions or norms exist are invalid because they are not "biological". Most of he arguments are questionable at best, and leave out inconvenient facts. Save your credits and look elsewhere if you want an actual history of humanity instead of this diatribe

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Bully Pulpit

  • Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism
  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 36 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,955
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,691
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,683

Goodwin describes the broken friendship between Teddy Roosevelt and his chosen successor, William Howard Taft. With the help of the "muckraking" press, Roosevelt had wielded the Bully Pulpit to challenge and triumph over abusive monopolies, political bosses, and corrupting money brokers. Roosevelt led a revolution that he bequeathed to Taft only to see it compromised as Taft surrendered to money men and big business. The rupture led Roosevelt to run against Taft for president, an ultimately futile race that gave power away to the Democrats.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow! Patience Rewarded!

  • By Carole T. on 01-22-14

A Historical Allegory for Current Events

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-19-13

If you could sum up The Bully Pulpit in three words, what would they be?

Progressive Media Propoganda

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Bully Pulpit?

Betrayal of Taft by Roosevelt due to arrogance.Taft thrust into politics largely against his will.The meltdown of McCure's Magazine.

Which character – as performed by Edward Herrmann – was your favorite?

Taft

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

no

Any additional comments?

This book appears to me as an attempted vindication and rationalization of government and media collusion that is so common today. Numerous times the author laments that many of the progressive initiatives of Roosevelt did not go far enough. Despite the obviousness of the political views of Ms. Kearns Goodwin, it is fairly entertaining profile of a very familiar sounding charismatic progressive whose arrogance and outsized ego became his undoing. This character flaw ultimately compelled him to betray a lifelong friend in favor of continued power, only to be rebuffed by voters, and ultimately dooming the presidential ambitions of both. The characterization of the media is also familiar, as it details the morphing of journalists from impartial reporters of the news to advocates of causes and political agents of politicians. Naturally, the author celebrates this transition because of the consistent support for progressive causes. Bottom line, it was enlightening and worth the time, even if I happen not to agree with the authors conclusions or interpretations on many points.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful