LISTENER

Anonymous

  • 3
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 401
  • ratings
  • Tangled Webs

  • How False Statements are Undermining America: From Martha Stewart to Bernie Madoff
  • By: James B. Stewart
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 19 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 56
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 47

In Tangled Webs, James B. Stewart reveals in vivid detail the consequences of the perjury epidemic that has swept our country, undermining the very foundation of our courts.With many prosecutors, investigators, and participants speaking for the first time, Tangled Webs goes behind the scene of the trials of media and homemaking entrepreneur Martha Stewart; top White House political adviser Lewis "Scooter" Libby; home-run king Barry Bonds; and Wall Street money manager Bernard Madoff. Tangled Webs reaffirms the importance of truth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • in great detail

  • By Andy on 06-22-11

Tangled Webs

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-07-16

Would you listen to Tangled Webs again? Why?

In “Tangled Webs: How False Statements Are Undermining America: From Martha Stewart to Bernie Madoff,” James B. Stewart begins with this premise: perjury is a national epidemic and a review of four of our highest profiled perjurers: Martha Stewart, Scooter Libby, Barry Bonds (and Marion Jones and others) and the king of them all, Bernie Madoff, may provide insight into why everyone else does it so freely. Maybe. Probably not. Forget the theme, or the reason, or the motivation, this is a book you simply cannot put down. Stewart’s great skill is the ability to take these “tangled webs” and bring them into sharp focus leaving the reader walking through this distempered world with intimacy unrivaled. He is a quote machine providing extended reference to transcripts, documents, interviews. When they sing, they really sing, and usually lie then, too. Despite his under-theme that a failure to fully prosecute encourages more and damaging the very fabric of our society, everyone here, save Bonds, suffered consequences that overwhelmed what would have resulted had they told the truth: Martha Steward lost nearly $1 billion of net worth. As they say, with a “b.” (Poor thing, she is down to her last $130,000,000.00-still and all.) All to save about $45,000. But then, she has producers box up food she cooks on shows to take home with her. And for Martha, rules are for other people, for suckers. And don’t cross her. Scooter went to prison and his Commander in Chief, to the great anger of the prince of darkness himself, Mr. Cheney, refused to grant pardon and thereby, in the words of Cheney, “left a soldier on the field.” Libby is the one guy I most wonder about. His lies did little for him (except to save his job and reputation once he started) and he wasn’t even the guy who leaked Plame to Novak (the unpunished Rove and Armitage did). But he was the guy who learned who about Plame’s identity directly from Cheney (which he denied) who was mad as hell about the state of the Union and Plame’s husband’s allegations that Cheney buried the truth about yellow-cake uranium. Libby was loyal. The real story of Madoff is not in his deception (catastrophic) but in the SEC’s colossal failure to uncover it. Rarely has there been so much over-looked perjury. Madoff was not talented. He could not keep his stories straight and lied to the same people. The SEC was lazy and uninspired. They cared more about a closed investigation than uncovering a crime. Remarkably, they never even asked who was on the other side of all these trades or made a single call to see if any trades had even happened. They hadn’t. Had they made one call, his scheme would have collapsed at a time when he managed $20 billion. When he called the FBI to confess (the SEC never caught him), that number was $65 billion. Another $45 billion lost all because the regulators simply did not care. This is a great work for all those who hear the politicians roar that government regulators are killing us. Wow. No regulation has ever preceded bad behavior. It responds to it. Take it away and the Bernie’s thrive like weeds. So do the Kochs. Little wonder they are selling you regulation is bad baloney. Which leaves us with Bonds, and Jones, and the rest of the BALCO steroid legion. Bonds is really a stunning guy. No one ever liked him. He doesn’t like himself. Or anyone else. His father was famous and he was talented. Everyone else can go to hell. Everyone. And yet, his personal guy, Anderson, the man who brought him the drugs, refused to testify, went to jail, still is silent, life ruined. And Barry, for all that so-called loyalty, doesn’t speak to him. This is a work that reveals and reveals. Tell the truth.

  • 500 Days

  • Secrets and Lies in the Terror Wars
  • By: Kurt Eichenwald
  • Narrated by: Holter Graham
  • Length: 22 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 185
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

In 500 Days, master chronicler Kurt Eichenwald lays bare the harrowing decisions, deceptions, and delusions of the eighteen months that changed the world forever, as leaders raced to protect their citizens in the wake of 9/11. Eichenwald's gripping, immediate style and true-to-life dialogue puts readers at the heart of these historic events, from the Oval Office to Number 10 Downing Street, from Guantanamo Bay to the depths of CIA headquarters, from the al Qaeda training camps to the torture chambers of Egypt and Syria.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Incredible

  • By steve on 02-13-16

Excellent book in need of a Narrator

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-28-13

What did you love best about 500 Days?

This book does an excellent job of disclosing how even the most disciplined minds, once arrogance and power overwhelm experience and wisdom, can destroy the most cherished principles we have. The narrator, however, has a talent for making everyone sound stupid when quoted. His "Italian" accent sounds like it is from Transylvania. The fine writing kept me going but with this narration, it was tough. He didn't do much for "The Art of Fielding" either where, once again, his voice has a penchant for making characters seem really stupid. One wonders why.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Read with meaning and leave his theatrics at home.

Any additional comments?

I will have trouble with any new book read by this guy.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Social Animal

  • The Hidden Sources of Love, Character, and Achievement
  • By: David Brooks
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey
  • Length: 16 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,408
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 931
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 928

This is the story of how success happens. It is told through the lives of one composite American couple, Harold and Erica - how they grow, push forward, are pulled back, fail, and succeed. Distilling a vast array of information into these two vividly realized characters, Brooks illustrates a fundamental new understanding of human nature.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Finally!

  • By Pamela Harvey on 03-13-11

David Brooks" "The Social Animal"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-12

What did you love best about The Social Animal?

After spending too much time with crappy modern fiction of recent, the kind of book that leaves your desire for insight hanging out the window like a dog’s tongue on a hot day, I turned to David Brooks’ “The Social Animal.” Brooks follows a fictional couple from birth through life’s completed journey turning to an encyclopedic reservoir of resources to explain and enlighten the how and why we get there. The breadth of his source material is stunning from ancient texts of philosophy and theology to the most modern resources of neuroimaging and brain study. It leaves me wondering how he ever completes his day job. This is a book where every sentence is worth it. Not only does he write with the crisp precision of a surgeon, but he can step on the gas and make you laugh, winch, weep, wonder and pause as those tiny hammers in your head go clink, clink, clink with a new vision or the profound recognition that what you barely knew you now know and understand why. I hate books with promise but no payoff. This book has promise and payoff. I will not spoil this but let me end with this: in a book that is primarily discoursive and intellectual, when the journey ended, tears were streaming down my face. The final line is the point of the spear. Don’t go there first. Let him lead you there so the puncture is that much sweeter. Highly recommended. I may just start over and hear it again.

Have you listened to any of Arthur Morey’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes and he is outstanding.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?