LISTENER

FWarrior

  • 5
  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 37
  • ratings
  • Justice in America

  • How the Prosecutors and the Media Conspire Against the Accused
  • By: J. Cheney Mason
  • Narrated by: Don Colasurd Jr.
  • Length: 6 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2

In Justice in America, Anthony defense attorney J. Cheney Mason, who was brought in to save the case, asserts that the jury got it right, and that America, the media, and the public blinded by the nightly lights, got it all wrong. His is the final chapter on the Anthony trial which ignited, mesmerized, and inflamed the public. Attorney Mason answers the remaining questions left by previous authors with a play-by-play account of what was happening behind the scenes with Casey.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • worst narrator ever!

  • By Jo Jo on 01-26-18

Awful Narration Messes Up an Interesting Book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-23-18

What would have made Justice in America better?

Change the narrator. It baffles me that Mr. Colasurd has narrated other books.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Justice in America?

The parts where the narrator refers to the book as "Justice On America". It happens multiple times.

What didn’t you like about Don Colasurd Jr.’s performance?

His stilted delivery. The fact that he pretty much ignores punctuation. That he mispronounces and mumbles through a bunch of different words multiple times. I had to repeat what he was saying in my head sometimes to make sense of it. It was very distracting.

Any additional comments?

I might actually buy the hardcover or ebook version of this book because the story was really interesting. There were a lot of things about the Anthony Case in this book that Jose Baez didn't go into in his book. If were Mr. Mason, I'd be very upset about what the narrator did to my book and demand that it be redone by someone else.

  • Just Mercy

  • A Story of Justice and Redemption
  • By: Bryan Stevenson
  • Narrated by: Bryan Stevenson
  • Length: 11 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 7,616
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,896
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 6,867

Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Made me question justice, peers and myself.

  • By Kristy VL on 04-17-15

A Heartfelt Indictment of the Death Penalty

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I would recommend this book to anyone who is on the fence about whether or not the death penalty should be used as punishment in the US. The tales of the people whose lives are sacrificed on the altar of justice will make you question whether it's justice at all.

What about Bryan Stevenson’s performance did you like?

You can feel how sincere he is about the work that he does and that he genuinely and truly cares for the people he's worked with, that he speaks about.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. It has to be taken in in pieces. It would be overwhelming to listen to it in a single sitting. You would miss out on the different stories and the issues that each story raises.

  • Murder in the Family

  • By: Burl Barer
  • Narrated by: James Edward Thomas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 184
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 165
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 164

On March 15th, 1987 police in Anchorage, Alaska arrived at a horrific scene of carnage. In a modest downtown apartment, they found Nancy Newman's brutally beaten corpse sprawled across her bed. In other rooms were the bodies of her eight-year-old daughter, Melissa, and her three-year-old, Angie, whose throat was slit from ear to ear. Both Nancy and Melissa had been sexually assaulted.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Narration very good

  • By Vashti A. Thomas on 10-11-16

Chilling True Crime Tale

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

What made the experience of listening to Murder in the Family the most enjoyable?

I enjoyed all the details about and around the trial. The lawyers went to battle. The way the author presented the information really had me thinking the verdict could have gone either way. The graphic details about the murders was a bit much, and they seemed to have been repeated several times.

  • Strong Advocate

  • The Life of a Trial Lawyer
  • By: Thomas Strong
  • Narrated by: Alan Taylor
  • Length: 8 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21

In Strong Advocate, Thomas Strong, one of the most successful trial lawyers in Missouri's history, chronicles his adventures as a contemporary personal injury attorney. Though the profession is held in low esteem by the general public, Strong entered the field with the right motives: to help victims who have been injured by defective products or through the negligence of others.

As a twelve-year-old in rural southwest Missouri during the Great Depression, Strong bought a cow, then purchased others as he could afford them, and eventually financed his education with the milk he sold.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slow Start But Gets Better

  • By Ryan on 01-31-19

Worth a listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

Would you listen to Strong Advocate again? Why?

I might. I didn't know who Thomas Strong was before listening to this book, but he seems like the kind of attorney young attorneys should model themselves after. The story of his life the challenges he faced as a young man, and how he used his circumstances and losses to propel himself into a successful legal career were inspiring.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

The time he spent talking about his cases and his philosophy in approaching and taking on new cases.

Have you listened to any of Alan Taylor’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Never listened to any other of Alan Taylor's performances, but when a performer disappears into the role and does not distract from the content of the text, I think he or she does a great job. I think Mr. Taylor did that.

  • Fundamental Cases

  • The Twentieth-Century Courtroom Battles That Changed Our Nation - The Modern Scholar
  • By: Alan M. Dershowitz
  • Narrated by: Alan M. Dershowitz
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 233
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130

It was Alexis de Tocqueville who, when he visited the new republic for the first time, said that America was a unique country when it comes to law. Every great issue eventually comes before the courts. With this in mind, esteemed professor and civil liberties lawyer Alan Dershowitz looks at history through the prism of the trial, which presents a snapshot of what's going on in a particular point in time of the nation's history.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • I'd rather be able to rate each section.

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-30-10

An Easy Listen that Goes Quick

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-17

Would you listen to Fundamental Cases again? Why?

I'm sure I'll listen to it again. Dershowitz's insight into the cases he presents is worth listening to again and again. Dersh weaves together his opinions and experience with facts, law and policy (and in the later chapters, politics) to educate and enlighten. I wish he'd spent more time laying the ground work for some of the cases he lectures on. You can tell that he knows far more and is holding back.

What other book might you compare Fundamental Cases to and why?

If there are other similar books on Audible, I'd like to check them out. It compares somewhat to Gerry Spence's "Police State" in that it examines cases as vignettes to make larger points about the court system, but the topics here are broader and not so tied to the facts of the case.

Which scene was your favorite?

The O.J. Simpson case and the Mike Tyson case.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Bush v. Gore. Dershowitz's indictment of the Supreme Court as a body heavily influenced by the justices' own petty ambitions and partisan politics blew away any naïve beliefs that remained in me about an impartial and independent judiciary.

Any additional comments?

I wish there were more Audible offerings like this, with more recent material. If anyone has any suggestions on similar programs, I'd appreciate it.