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Elliot

Tampa, Florida, United States
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  • The Ibarra Sanction

  • Terran Armor Corps, Book 2
  • By: Richard Fox
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 6 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,158
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,097

Once, the Ibarras saved Earth and all of humanity from utter destruction. Now they are fugitives and traitors hunted by the Terran Union's mightiest warriors. After fleeing with a stolen armada, the Ibarra family have finally emerged from hiding and are scouring the galaxy for an ancient alien legacy, destroying any who get in their way. For armor soldier Roland Shaw, the call to put down the Ibarra mutiny is a bitter task as he and the Iron Dragoons come face to face with the Ibarras in order to discover if they are truly their friends or their most deadly foe.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome continuation of the Ember War universe.

  • By Scott Moon on 01-13-18

Excellent as always, but why so short?!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-29-17

This is probably one of the most interesting and exciting of the books out of the two series. Lots of development for characters from both the Ember War and the Terran Armor Corps. It definitely seems like Richard Fox is preparing for a whole new saga with what we are introduced to here, and I hope I'm not wrong. The quasi-twist at the end definitely gave me some chills. I just wish it wasn't such a short book! I suppose there is something to be said for quality over quantity. But so much could have been hashed out with all of the new plot elements introduced. I'm just bummed that I have to wait another few months for the next edition, I guess.

Luke Daniels is 100% perfect as always.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Revolution

  • Omega Force, Book 9
  • By: Joshua Dalzelle
  • Narrated by: Paul Heitsch
  • Length: 8 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,017
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 967
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 965

Rumors have swirled around about the demise of the ConFed for as long as Jason Burke had been in space, a lone human among countless alien species. He largely ignored them...until now. For the first time since any of the members of Omega Force can remember, someone may have figured out how to destroy the ConFed without directly engaging its powerful military. As one crewmember's past seems connected to the current trouble, Jason must decide what side of the fight he's on....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Don't stop now!

  • By Christopher B Kulig on 12-31-17

Everything you love about this series... and more

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-17

Not that he was ever subpar, but Joshua Dalzelle has noticeably honed his craft since the beginning of the Omega Force series. Throwing in a few blockbusters in the form of the Black Fleet trilogy certainly hasn't hurt. But I admit I've been waiting a while for Paul Heitsch to finish the narration on this, and I wasn't disappointed.

Like all the others, this book is action-packed with just the right amount of irreverence. But unlike a lot of other novels in the genre, Dalzelle has brought a depth of character to each individual. This is particularly relevant in this edition.

Without giving too much away, we learn more about our favorite battle synth than we ever have before. We take potshots at our favorite mobster's fortress, just because. Earth is dipping its toes into the cosmos in the way Earth does best (with just a little bit of overkill). And the ConFed is getting tested by all of the galactic superpowers we have learned about thus far. And that's just scratching the surface.

I really hope we get to Book 10 soon, because the cliff we are left hanging onto is not an easy one.

Thanks for such a fun series, Mr. Dalzelle.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Digital Evolution

  • The Game Is Life, Book 6
  • By: Terry Schott
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 105
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 100

Ten years have passed on Tygon since the Virtual Prophet woke the Dreamers. Games of life and death continue, and the stakes for winning - or losing - promise to affect the inhabitants across three realities.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very confusing keeping track, too convulted

  • By Sailfish on 11-22-17

Loose ends tied while a tapestry unravels

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-17

Firstly, I just want to thank Schott for naming a major character after me. I'm sure this isn't at all a coincidence. Nope. ;)

I predict the reviews for this book will be a bit contentious. Personally, I enjoyed it. But, I have the feeling a lot of people who are casual listeners might have some complaints.

Tru and Danielle are back. In fact this book does a good job of bringing back pretty much everybody. Considering how many characters and worlds Schott has introduced, I think you'll get my implication that a lot of listeners might find this edition to be a bit overwhelming.

The literary *multi*verse brought to us in this series is amazing. If you're paying attention, the way the worlds fit together is very much clarified in this submission. The palace intrigue is wild. It is unlikely that you'll find yourself bored at any point.

Schott is definitely a fan of the "surprise reveal"; However, this can be problematic when it's been a few or even several books since a character was first introduced. I am fortunate because I decided to briefly re-listen to some portions of Interlude: Brandon and Shadows. If I would not have done this, I think I would have been very, very lost at the significance of some of the happenings. Schott's stories are honestly a bit more suited for an arc on a TV show than other media. Digital Evolution may be a bit *too* overwrought, if I'm being honest.

If you're okay with a little ambiguity and willing to read between the lines, I think you'll enjoy this book as much as I did.

Also, this book has one of the biggest cliffhangers, maybe ever. In fact, the term "cliffhanger" is wildly inadequate to describe how things are left. (I refuse to listen to the short snippets at the end of the books. I don't like spoilers.)

Luke Daniels is great as always. I'm really glad his clear and precise narration was gifted for this series. I think the majority of performers would not do it justice.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • After the Rabbit

  • Waldo Rabbit Series, Book 2
  • By: Nelson Chereta
  • Narrated by: Gary Furlong
  • Length: 6 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 520
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 487
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 486

Waldo Rabbit is back! Waldo and Alice continue on their quest, now accompanied by the ogre Gronk. They are headed to Norwich, where they hope to find the third monster that will be Waldo's last familiar. But things are never as simple as they seem. An archlich, White Mage, and murderous rabbits all stand in the way. Yes, that's right, the murderous flesh eating rabbits make their appearance! Waldo is both the hunter and the hunted.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Shouldnt be called book 2

  • By Yazeed alshobaili on 08-09-17

Def too short, but still want the next one

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-17

This is a great universe built by Mr. Chereta. I'm amazed that there is so little material, though. I feel like if I built a literary cosmos like this, I would have trouble keeping things from getting too long. I'm not sure who decided that he should release only half a book. Maybe he needed some cash.

Regardless, if you enjoyed the first book, you'll enjoy this one. That's about all there is to say about that.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Death Becomes Her

  • The Kurtherian Gambit, Book 1
  • By: Michael Anderle
  • Narrated by: Emily Beresford
  • Length: 6 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,325
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,247
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,246

What you thought you knew about vampires and werewolves is wrong...so very, very, wrong. A thousand years of effort to keep the Unknown World hidden is unraveling and the Patriarch is tired. He needs to find someone to take over. He finds Bethany Anne.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • amazingly refreshing

  • By kevin on 02-15-17

Not your standard Vamp/Were fair

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-17

I was put off a bit at first because like everyone else, I'm pretty sick of Vampires and Werewolves. I mean, seriously, why does every Urban Fantasy series have to focus so much on these creatures? Whatever happened to creativity? Originality?

Well, I have to admit that Michael Anderle does a good job of finally injecting some of that much needed creativity into an overly beaten dead horse. The book starts off a mite slow, but I would suggest that this is necessary for the sake of introducing all the In-Universe Lore. Don't think I'm making a perfect analogy here, but the way the Vamps exist in this universe can probably best be compared to the different Courts in the Dresden Files universe.

Anderle actually makes somewhat of an effort of creating balance in both personality and power. The characters aren't all just over-exaggerated archetypes. That's not to say he didn't make use of archetypes such as the workaholic male General or the tough-as-nails need-no-man female agent. But these individuals at least have layers and weaknesses.

The book definitely keeps interest and introduces some novel plot elements I'm interested to see utilized. I am excited to have finally found a new series.

Oh, and Emily Beresford's narration is excellent. I can see how some might find her performing of the main protagonist to be grating, but I believe that's exactly how the author intended. Her narration of all the other characters, regardless of gender, are great fits and easily discerned. I am definitely going to look for more of her work aside from this series in the future.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fight and Flight

  • Magic 2.0, Book 4
  • By: Scott Meyer
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 10 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 8,833
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8,327
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,305

Martin and his friends discovered that their world is computer generated and that by altering the code they could alter reality. They traveled back in time to Medieval England to live as wizards. Almost everything they've done since then has, in one way or another, blown up in their faces. So of course they decide to make dragons. It does not go well.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Major stumble in a great series

  • By Virgil on 05-11-17

A lot of laughs, but mostly meh

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-17

Scott Meyer is capable of some pretty in depth writing."Master of Formalities", "The Authorities", and the first 3 books of the Magic 2.0 series contain some great storytelling. Fight and Flight does not. It's pretty obvious that this was probably a short story that Audible demanded be turned into a full book.

It's frustrating that Mr. Meyer creates a plot device that allows characters to have virtually all of time and space at their fingertips and yet they do little more than putz around in one location in one time period. The challenges the characters face in this book would be more appropriate for a children's novel. The personalities of every character has now been reduced to a cliche. Most the new characters introduced are irritating.

However, the book *was* entertaining. There were a lot of moments that left me laughing out loud. The universe itself is so intriguing that I was still drawn in, in spite of what boring plot. Luke Daniels performance is superb as always.

The end of the book does leave open the possibility of the next edition being very exciting. I just really hope Mr. Meyer will heed these critical reviews and open things up a bit. Seriously, all of time and space and we get a bunch of incompetent boobs bumbling around Leadchurch. Come on, man.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Shadows

  • The Game Is Life, Book 5
  • By: Terry Schott
  • Narrated by: Luke Daniels
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 149
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 140

Dawn belongs to a secret group of teenagers who play a cloak and dagger game on their cell phones. Her world is turned upside down when the players' actions begin to affect reality, and not in good ways.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Bait and Switch

  • By Eric Travis on 06-25-17

Somewhat standalone but excited to see how it fits

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-17

The Publisher's summary doesn't do this justice at all. I'll give a brief explanation that will help tie it into the larger series a bit more without giving any spoilers. But, I can tell you that this book could pretty much stand on its own and still be a solid sci-fi installment.

Based on the "preview" at the end of Book 4 - "Virtual Prophet" - this was not initially planned as Book 5. I would guess that as Book 5 took form, Mr. Schott felt like adding some background. This is very similar to what he did with Interlude: Brandon. Yes, this book appears to actually be a prequel to the rest of the series, taking place even before Interlude: Brandon, given the age of a specific character I won't name.

There may have been more clues I missed, but it's difficult or maybe impossible to say *where* exactly this book takes place within the series, however. "North America" is specifically mentioned, but cities are only designated numerically. I don't think I remember in Interlude Brandon there ever being any Earthly geographic locations named in the world where young Brandon lives. Nevertheless, my feeling is that this book takes place in that world and is a buildup to the war that is brought to a standstill in part by General Donovan. I am only guessing though. Judge for yourself.

It was a little slow going at first as I tried to orientate myself, but once I just let go and stopped trying to figure out connections to the previous books, I was able to enjoy it. It's worth it. You will meet one character in particular who appears to be of some mysterious importance to the whole multiverse. You probably know who I am talking about.

In summary, if you go into this book hoping for more on True and Danielle, you are going to be disappointed. Just give it a chance and understand that while the book does indeed fit into the larger series, we probably won't learn until the next book exactly how everything clicks. I just hope Mr. Schott and Luke Daniels can bring us the 6th edition sooner rather than later.

  • SpecOps

  • Expeditionary Force, Book 2
  • By: Craig Alanson
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 15 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,774
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,721
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,655

Colonel Joe Bishop made a promise, and he's going to keep it: taking the captured alien starship Flying Dutchman back out. He doesn't agree when the UN decides to send almost 70 elite Special Operations troops, hotshot pilots, and scientists with him; the mission is a fool's errand he doesn't expect to ever return from. At least this time, the Earth is safe, right? Not so much.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Repetitive and watered-down

  • By Daniel on 04-26-17

A perfect mix of militray scifi and irreverence

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-17

Military scifi and space operas rarely have me uncontrollably laughing out loud, but Mr. Alanson succeeds over and over.

I can only echo what all the other reviews have said. I would argue this book is at least as good and probably better than Columbus Day. The writing, while never awful, has noticeably improved in the sequel. I am really curious as to Mr. Alanson's background as he is rather superb at writing accurate depictions of a fairly diverse cast of characters.

R.C. Bray is always good, but his performance in these books is award winning. I could listen to Colonel Joe and Skippy back and forth for an entire book on its own.

Here's to hoping for many more of the same quality.

  • Empire's End: Aftermath

  • Star Wars
  • By: Chuck Wendig
  • Narrated by: Marc Thompson
  • Length: 15 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,535
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,053
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,038

Following Star Wars: Aftermath and Star Wars: Life Debt, Chuck Wendig delivers the exhilarating conclusion to the New York Times best-selling trilogy set in the years between Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • meh

  • By RC on 03-09-17

Best of the Aftermath trilogy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-17

If the other two books were of this quality, the Aftermath trilogy just might be even vaguely comparable to the Legends' Heir to the Empire (Thrawn). Speaking of, there is a bit of a treat for fans of that series in this book. No spoilers though.

I'm really starting to miss Luke Skywalker. And I even miss Chewie. But I appreciate Mon Mothma's character building. The other main characters introduced to us by Wendig are brought to solid conclusions one way or another

I am not sure who is responsible for dreaming up Rae Sloane, but she is definitely one of my favorite characters in the new universes, just behind Sinjir. She is as badass as ever in this book, even as an "outcast." I hope Sloane makes an appearance in the movies, though the future of the "Empire" as laid out in this book makes it hard to predict how everything will be connected.

I'm any event, if you read/listened to the first two in the trilogy, definitely give this one a try. It makes the whole thing worth it.

Mark Thompson is exceptional as always. I have absolutely no comprehension how he does what he does.

3 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Immortal: Curse of the Deathless

  • By: Derek Edgington
  • Narrated by: Nik Magill
  • Length: 11 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 99
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 95
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 96

If Asher Hearst had a superpower, it would have to be his ability to take a punch, laugh it off, and keep on swinging. So yeah, immortality comes with a few perks. As a college student slash small-time fixer, he's about to take a job that's best left to the pros. A proposition by a dryad to save witches from the Inquisition is a first, but he isn't one to balk when the odds are stacked against him. Especially not while he's drinking on someone else's dime.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Immortal

  • By MeDi on 04-09-17

Urban Fantasy Comedy with a twist

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-30-17

This is a solid formal debut from an independent author. Urban Fantasy is my favorite genre, and this edition does not disappoint. The protagonist, Asher Hearst, is multifaceted in all the ways you want your main character to be.

The book is jam-packed with plot. Thinking back on it, I'm amazed everything was fit into a single release. There are wizards and witches with some intriguing magic, faeries (fae) of many varieties, a fair amount of action, not too much family drama, warm romance, noble acts, interesting side characters, and a straightforward plot with plenty of twists and turns. The book doesn't rely on too many stale urban fantasy tropes. The supernatural infrastructure isn't a focal point, but it feels fresh.

Unless your sense of humor is way off-base, you will find yourself chuckling at and with the protagonist. The humor isn't shoehorned in, and Asher's attitude is as much of a superpower as his immortality. Though the immortality aspect is, of course, an important element, there is still a question of just how much Asher can really take. Considering he's going up against literal gods and inter-dimensional beings, his survival really isn't guaranteed. Indeed, I am not going to give away whether or not he does survive. It wouldn't be the first time an author sacrificed their main character.

I can see how the narrator might not be everyone's cup of tea, but I felt he was good fit for Asher. He did a fine job portraying the secondary characters, as well. He hammed it up a bit with some, as you will find, but the ham seems appropriate in retrospect.

I do hope Mr. Edgington is able to produce more works of a similar caliber. I will be one of the first to purchase them.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful