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  • The Sleep Tight Motel

  • Dark Corners Collection, Book 2
  • By: Lisa Unger
  • Narrated by: Amy Landon
  • Length: 1 hr and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 610
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 528
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 524

Eve has a fake ID, a .38, and a violent lover receding in the rearview mirror. He’ll never find her at the isolated motel, and its kindly manager is happy to ease her fears. But if Eve is the only guest, whom does she keep hearing on the other side of the wall? Eve won’t get a good night’s rest until she finds out.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • The reading is flat, dull, and awful

  • By Chynna Blue on 10-01-18

Neat Short Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-19

It's not difficult to figure out what's going on before you're actually told, but I wanted to see how this author would arrive at the same story conclusion that other writers have. I wasn't put off by the time line jumps--they're pretty easy to follow. I do have questions about certain situations, although they are not pressing enough to ruin the story. I'm not a fan of stories about abused women who don't stand up for themselves. However, it's not very long so I didn't have to fume more than 1.5 hours. The narrator is a bit robotic, but I think that the woman in the story probably felt that way. Detached, confused. Landon was a good choice to read this.

  • The Demon Next Door

  • By: Bryan Burrough
  • Narrated by: Steve White
  • Length: 2 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15,560
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 14,007
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 13,940

Best-selling author Bryan Burrough recently made a shocking discovery: The small town of Temple, Texas, where he had grown up, had harbored a dark secret. One of his high school classmates, Danny Corwin, was a vicious serial killer. In this chilling tale, Burrough raises important questions of whether serial killers can be recognized before they kill or rehabilitated after they do. It is also a story of Texas politics and power that led the good citizens of the town of Temple to enable a demon who was their worst nightmare.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Less sensational than advertised

  • By Kingsley on 03-01-19

Narration Problem

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-06-19

This bare-bones story about a serial killer is sort of interesting, but it could have been much more so if Richard Ferrone had narrated. Steve White is not a bad reader, but his happy tone is better suited for YA or teaching a class. We also need more facts and interviews. Corwin was despicable, but attorneys were a close second. The way the surviving female victims during that time period were treated by the courts was (and still is in some places) outrageous.

  • A Treacherous Curse

  • By: Deanna Raybourn
  • Narrated by: Angele Masters
  • Length: 11 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,267
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,171
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,169

London, 1888. As colorful and unfettered as the butterflies she collects, Victorian adventuress Veronica Speedwell can't resist the allure of an exotic mystery - particularly one involving her enigmatic colleague, Stoker. His former expedition partner has vanished from an archaeological dig with a priceless diadem unearthed from the newly discovered tomb of an Egyptian princess. This disappearance is just the latest in a string of unfortunate events that have plagued the controversial expedition, and rumors abound that the curse of the vengeful princess has been unleashed as the shadowy figure of Anubis himself stalks the streets of London.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I rarely give a book a 5, but....

  • By bigdjunta on 04-27-18

Boring

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-19

I like the lead characters, but Holy Cow, this was boring. The shrill voices of the older women are almost unbearable--but maybe that's the point. I appreciate learning more about Stoker's bitchy wife and I liked how Veronica takes no bs from anyone. Still, this story is totally unmemorable and I only listened to find out what might happen between Stoker and Veronica. Otherwise, this was a waste of my time.

  • Past Tense

  • A Jack Reacher Novel
  • By: Lee Child
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 12 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,699
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,091
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,052

Jack Reacher hits the pavement and sticks out his thumb. He plans to follow the sun on an epic trip across America, from Maine to California. He doesn't get far. On a country road deep in the New England woods, he sees a sign to a place he has never been: the town where his father was born. He thinks, What's one extra day? He takes the detour. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • FIVE STAR BOOK And NARRATION!!!!

  • By shelley on 11-05-18

Weird, Boring, yet Clever. When is the Next One?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-28-19

Lee Child is the only author who can take a basic, mundane situation and turn it into a multi-disciplinary dissertation. Our hero Reacher walks down the sidewalk and sizes up opponents, but Child describes these situations in such weird ways that I can't tell if Reacher is truly doing what I envision or if he is instead engaged in something that I am too dense to understand. Everything Reacher does is magnified and analyzed psychologically and physically. That's not really a bad thing, it's just that with Reacher, ordinary scenarios are described as more important than they really are. Anyway, in this book we bounce back and forth between two completely different stories. Reacher tries to figure out his family tree or something, and a decent young couple finds themselves in a terrible situation at a creepy hotel. When there were four hours left in the book, Reacher said he would go to that hotel. I was out running by our local lake and yelled, "All right! Let's go!" Up until that time I kept switching back and forth to other audible books out of boredom and impatience. For most of those four hours, things got to where I really wanted them to be. Reacher, in his classic masculine moves, dispatched the villains in really satisfying ways; the victims turned the tables; Reacher walked out of the forest without breaking a nail and refuses to take a reward. And, as usual, within minutes he seems to forget what he just did because he's on to the next situation. After that interesting plot was dealt with, the whole family story arch sank back into a weird mire again. At this point, I would like to see Reacher attempt to settle down, decorate a home, plant a garden and raise goats or something. That would not work because Reacher is otherworldly, but it would be fun to see how Child might create a story like that. Brick does a fine job--not everyone can be Dick Hill so we have to deal with it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Hell Divers III: Deliverance

  • The Hell Divers series, Book 3
  • By: Nicholas Sansbury Smith
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 11 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8,034
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,578
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,563

Left for dead on the nightmarish surface of the planet, Commander Michael Everhart and his team of Hell Divers barely escape with their lives aboard a new airship called Deliverance. After learning that Xavier "X" Rodriguez may still be alive, they mount a rescue mission for the long-lost hero. In the skies, the Hive is falling apart, but Captain Jordan is more determined than ever to keep humanity in their outdated lifeboat. He will do whatever it takes to keep the ship in the air - even murder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another awesome entry in a great series!

  • By Lisa L on 05-15-18

Ridiculous Antagonist

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

One star off for the ridiculous antagonist. There is no way so many people would follow such a despicable person unless there was something in it for them (look to current politics for proof of that). Of course, all it would take is one swipe of a knife and the story is over. Almost took off another star for X not telling the others about the cannibals. Him being too tired to talk is no reason. There are too many monsters at every turn and what the heck is that cure-all "pill?" Still, so much better than the first book. Terrifying story and hopefully our peeps start procreating in a safe environment--otherwise the entire story will be even more bleak. I am hoping they can save some of the pod people (and dogs).

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Verses for the Dead

  • A Pendergast Novel
  • By: Douglas Preston, Lincoln Child
  • Narrated by: Rene Auberjonois
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,395
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,225
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,214

After an overhaul of leadership at the FBI's New York field office, A. X. L. Pendergast is abruptly forced to accept an unthinkable condition of continued employment: the famously rogue agent must now work with a partner. Pendergast and his new teammate, junior agent Coldmoon, are assigned to Miami Beach, where a rash of killings by a bloodthirsty psychopath are distinguished by a confounding M.O.: cutting out the hearts of his victims and leaving them - along with cryptic handwritten letters - at local gravestones, unconnected save in one bizarre way.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Completely Absorbing Pendergast novel...

  • By shelley on 01-01-19

Nothing Interesting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-19

There is nothing really wrong with this book, but the problem is that there is nothing special about it. It could have been written by a first-time novelist. Spoilers ahead. This time AXLP has a partner, the stereotypically named Coldmoon, who does not do much. (btw, I know a LOT of Lakotas and none of them have ancestors who took the name of people they vanquished. Who told the authors they do that?) There is a nothing burger subplot involving Pendergast's superior that goes exactly no place. Coldmoon as a partner was supposed to be a new twist that would upset our guy Aloysius, but he acted like he could not have cared less. The authors are really quite predictable. For ex., when someone was up a tree and had no where to go, the authors go out of their way to make sure we know he has no choices left. That only told me that a third party would take care of the situation and then ....bingo! I kept expecting something to happen, but the book was over and I wondered if that was all there is. The last scene with Smithback was unnecessary because any reader with a brain already knew everything discussed. Stars for no Constance and the always great Rene Auberjonois. It was a kick to hear him imitate young drunk women who have to "vom." If he had not narrated this, I would have returned it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Island 731

  • By: Jeremy Robinson
  • Narrated by: R. C. Bray
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,254
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,093
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,093

Mark Hawkins, former park ranger and expert tracker, is out of his element, working onboard the Magellan, a research vessel studying the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. But his work is interrupted when, surrounded by 30 miles of refuse, the ship and its high-tech systems are plagued by a series of strange malfunctions and the crew is battered by a raging storm. When the storm fades and the sun rises, the beaten crew awakens to find themselves anchored in the protective cove of a tropical island...and no one knows how they got there.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting fun story

  • By Rise on 01-24-16

Well, similar to, but better than Matthew Reilly

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-19

Well, to enjoy this crap fest you have to just go with it. The floating garbage is indeed interesting, horrifying, and a real-life threat. It's in the news today, by coincidence. I also looked up Island 731, so thank you author for that. I love cryptozoology and weird things like this, so I was ready to roll. The best part of the book is the incomparable narrator Bray and the character who conveniently happened to know everything about Island 731 and chimeras. Like I said, you have to just go with this ridiculous story that includes human/animal/insect hybrids and that for poorly explained reasons, a youngster calls the shots on this complicated and deadly island. The hero (who, of course, was taught by an American Indian) fights a croc/squid hybrid and can apparently hold his breath for 24 minutes. I listened to this while running in subfreezing weather so perhaps I simply was not concentrating enough to understand much of what was going on. How could the Mama Monster pick up someone with just one of her fingers? Why were the special ops guys there? That did not make sense. I needed more info about the spiders and their sting-three-times method of reproduction. What animal replicates like that? Whose boat were they on in the end? So the kid laid eggs--what was the connection to the people in the last scene? I really must have zoned out. To be fair, this story does move along, although I helped it by speeding to 1.25 to get through it.

  • The Killer

  • Victor the Assassin Series, Book 1
  • By: Tom Wood
  • Narrated by: Rob Shapiro
  • Length: 15 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,873
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,644
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,640

Meet Victor. He's an assassin - a man with no past and no surname. He lives alone. He operates alone. He's given a job; he takes out the target; he gets paid. He's The Killer. Victor arrives in Paris to perform a standard kill and collect for an anonymous client. He completes it with trademark efficiency - only to find himself in the middle of an ambush and fighting for his life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • THIS IS A THREE FOR...

  • By Cynthia on 03-12-14

Jack Reacher Lite

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-22-18

I tried several times to get into this book, but just could not. It's too long, for one thing. More importantly, the characters are mysteries--there's no development. The author goes into detail about how the hero/killer has a secret home, no one could possibly find him, etc., and yet they do. How exactly did that happen? No one could have known about the Paris apartment, either, but they did. How? Those kinds of details render anything else the hero/killer tries to do in secret uninteresting because we already know that the author will use the omnipresent force who knows everything he's doing and where he is. No fun in that at all. There are some good scenes and interesting situations, but after it became clear that the completely incompetent woman was used only to bolster the hero/killer's superman image, I turned it off. Enough with stupid females who become totally useless after hearing a gunshot. Asked to hurry the hell up to get away from some deadly pursuers, our girl is too dumbstruck with fear to even make a short leap to safely. This trope of course sets up another scenario in which the title character gets to appear masculine and heroic---again. There are too many books out there for readers to get bogged down with misogynistic writing. It occurred to me that maybe all that was on act on her part, but I'm not interested enough to find out. If the author would deal with these problems, I would be willing to try another of his books because he actually does write well.

  • Primordia

  • In Search of the Lost World
  • By: Greig Beck
  • Narrated by: Sean Mangan
  • Length: 11 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 165
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 165

A journey into the deepest, darkest jungles of the Venezuelan Amazon...and a primeval place and time that mankind was never meant to exist in. Ben Cartwright, former soldier, home to mourn the loss of his father, stumbles upon cryptic letters from the past between author Arthur Conan Doyle and his great-great-grandfather who vanished while exploring the Amazon jungle in 1908. Amazingly, these letters lead Ben to believe that his ancestor’s expedition was the basis for Doyle’s fantastical tale of a lost world inhabited by long-extinct creatures. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Greig Beck Nails It!!!

  • By BEANX4 on 07-24-18

Love-Hate

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-16-18

Beck, you did it again. You made me simultaneously love and hate a book and want to hear the next one. Here we go with a fantastically unlikely group of people delving into Doyles imaginative nightmare/dinosaur/uber-dangerous world that for some reason only appears once every ten years when a comet or something shoots past. In order to make this crazy story work, we have to believe that the intrepid explorers are not only young, attractive, ready to go, and besties, but they also have mad skills. One is wealthier than Richard Branson and can make this outlandishly expensive trip affordable; another is a rock climber, another a soldier, etc. And, there is the requisite bad guy who just happens to be tuned in to their plans. Stupidity and weird Mangan pronunciations abound. Still, this is fun (am always interested in titanoboas, ala Conan the Barbarian) and I am willing to crank it to 1.25 to get to the good parts. Where's part 2?

  • Alien: Sea of Sorrows

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: James A. Moore, Dirk Maggs
  • Narrated by: John Chancer, Stockard Channing, Walles Hamonde, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 7 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,924
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,802
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,793

Set 300 years after the events of Alien: Out of the Shadows and Alien: River of Pain, Alien: Sea of Sorrows deals with the rediscovery of dormant Xenomorphs (Aliens) in the abandoned mines of LV-178, the planetoid from Alien: Out of the Shadows, which has now been terraformed and renamed New Galveston. The Weyland-Yutani Corporation, reformed after the collapse of the United Systems Military, continue their unceasing efforts to weaponise the creatures.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Great performances but story is weakest of the 3

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-03-18

Hmmm

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-18

I like all of the Alien original dramas. The productions are excellent and they make me want to see the actors--all of them are good. This story takes a left turn and I'm not sure I like it. Now we have a Ripley descendant--how did that happen? Maybe I missed it. Anyway, the storyline of him with a mental link is intriguing, but this book is not long enough to fully explore this new twist. It feels as if Alien Fatigue is setting in. Can't the good guys win? Bleak scenes of brave men and women dying in cocoons is getting old. And please dispense with the Weyland group/company or whatever it is. Further, if any of these productions delve in to the David territory, I'm out. I loathe Prometheous and whatever that sequel is. On a good note, I couldn't figure out who the excellent villain woman is and am happy to discover it is Stockard Channing.