LISTENER

Tm P.

  • 7
  • reviews
  • 12
  • helpful votes
  • 24
  • ratings
  • The Brotherhood of the Wheel

  • By: R. S. Belcher
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 14 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,934
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,816
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,813

In AD 1119, a group of nine crusaders became known as the Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon - a militant monastic order charged with protecting pilgrims and caravans traveling on the roads to and from the Holy Land. In time, the Knights Templar would grow in power and, ultimately, be laid low. But a small offshoot of the Templars endure and have returned to the order's original mission: to defend the roads of the world and guard those who travel on them.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Urban Fantasy at its purest!

  • By kara-karina on 04-11-16

I never review books - but wow!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-16

Would you listen to The Brotherhood of the Wheel again? Why?

Yes - there is a lot of subtle detail I think one could only catch in the second listen.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Brotherhood of the Wheel?

I thought the meeting with "Aaron" was very memorable.

What about Bronson Pinchot’s performance did you like?

He always delivers a great performance. He struggled a bit with doing a Glasgow / North Caroline accent, but who wouldn't?

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There were several poignant scenes

Any additional comments?

Belcher did a great job here of bridging urban fantasy / horror story telling. I tend to avoid all-out horror titles because they cross the line out of believability too often. Brotherhood managed to 'stay inside the lines' for me the whole time. The fantastic and horror elements always stayed just grounded enough to avoid the eye-rolling "omg- seriously??" moments that seem to ruin a lot of horror titles for me.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Aurora

  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Ali Ahn
  • Length: 16 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,503
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,318
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,315

A major new novel from one of science fiction's most powerful voices, Aurora tells the incredible story of our first voyage beyond the solar system. Brilliantly imagined and beautifully told, it is the work of a writer at the height of his powers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful

  • By ewreirct on 07-14-15

Unbearable narration - what a let-down

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-15

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

The narration was such a turn-off - that might be a personal thing. If one didn't find the narration so bad, then it could potentially be an enjoyable book.

What do you think your next listen will be?

I might try another of KSRs books - I've liked them before. I will most certainly avoid this narrator.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Voices were almost all the same, inflection was almost constantly "mildly excited little girl" quality. No indication from vocal tone or pacing of when scenes changed, so I often couldn't tell when the story had moved from one location to another.

What character would you cut from Aurora?

I couldn't say - my negative feeling about the narration was a barrier to getting into any of the characters.

Any additional comments?

HIGHLY disappointed. I really like KSR, and the idea of a generation ship and the complicated social and scientific challenges really had me hyped for this book. It was an enormous let-down.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The End Is Now

  • The Apocalypse Triptych
  • By: John Joseph Adams, Hugh Howey, Scott Sigler
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki, Mur Lafferty, Kate Baker, and others
  • Length: 14 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 229
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 209
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 210

Famine. Death. War. Pestilence. These are the harbingers of the biblical apocalypse, of the End of the World. In science fiction, the end is triggered by less figurative means: nuclear holocaust, biological warfare/pandemic, ecological disaster, or cosmological cataclysm. But before any catastrophe, there are people who see it coming. During, there are heroes who fight against it. And after, there are the survivors who persevere and try to rebuild. "The Apocalypse Triptych" will tell their stories.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Loses a star because the last story is That Bad.

  • By Peter Wombat on 06-06-15

Hit and miss anthology

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-15

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

It *mostly* was. The two things I noticed were (1) these stories didn't really follow the theme of series as well as those in the first book - there were some great stories that really didn't have much to do with a 'the world is ending' anthology. (2) the readers were REALLY all over the place! Some were really good, and some were so awful I just couldn't listen to that story.

What other book might you compare The End Is Now to and why?

There are a couple other apocalypse theme anthologies on Audible, but really, it's compares well with any sci-fi story collection.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Various narrators, the quality was really inconsistent.

Did The End Is Now inspire you to do anything?

I may start saving more canned food and fresh water .. :-)

Any additional comments?

nope

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A People's History of the United States

  • By: Howard Zinn
  • Narrated by: Jeff Zinn
  • Length: 34 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,995
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,226
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,239

A classic since its original landmark publication in 1980, Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States is the first scholarly work to tell America's story from the bottom up - from the point of view of, and in the words of, America's women, factory workers, African-Americans, Native Americans, the working poor, and immigrant laborers.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Amateur hour in the production booth

  • By Thomas on 11-09-10

Politically admirable, factually awful

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-26-15

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I'm very left-of-center, and was glad I was finally getting around to this book, which is a classic in progressive writing. But it is so full of factual errors and unsupported assumptions that I had to stop listening and returned it after about an hour. If Zinn had stuck with the bare history (which more than makes his arguments about classism, racism and American society) I could have enjoyed this book. Instead, I cringed each time he said "What really happened was this.." then gave ZERO evidence to support his statement, or when he was just inaccurate with his history.

Would you ever listen to anything by Howard Zinn again?

No, not if this is typical.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The performance was fine - well read, and the reader had a nice voice.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from A People's History of the United States?

It could have been a great book - worthy of it's reputation - if Zinn could just stick to the facts. For example things like "Columbus called the natives Indians because he thought he was in India.." serves the purpose of making Columbus look stupid - but Zinn already had proof enough Columbus was brutal. Anyone w/ moderate history knowledge (and I'd assume Zinn had at least that) knows "Indian" is based on the Spanish word for "indigenous" - it got shortened by non-Spanish speakers to "Indios" which the English speakers transformed to "Indians" Zinn does this type of thing repeatedly in this book. It makes it phony and heavy handed.

Any additional comments?

This was about the most disappointing read I've picked up from Audible in a long time.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Secret Rooms: A True Gothic Mystery

  • By: Catherine Bailey
  • Narrated by: Stephen Rashbrook
  • Length: 15 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 160
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 148
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 148

In April 1940, the ninth Duke of Rutland died in mysterious circumstances in one of the rooms of his family estate, Belvoir Castle. The mystery surrounding these rooms holds the key to a tragic story that is played out on the brutal battlefields of the Western Front and in the exclusive salons of Mayfair and Belgravia in the dying years of la belle époque. Uncovered is a dark and disturbing period in the history of the Rutland family, and one which they were determined to keep hidden for over 60 years. Sixty years on, The Secret Rooms is the true story of family secrets and one man’s determination to keep the past hidden at any cost.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • ANTI-CLIMATIC MESS OF MINUTAIE

  • By The Louligan on 05-30-15

Bait and switch, with a Victorian package

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-14

What disappointed you about The Secret Rooms: A True Gothic Mystery?

There really isn't much of a mystery - a lot of build-up is made then revealed to be mundane, not-particularly-unique life events. Also, it was WAY too long - there were well written and entertaining sections that might have made up for the lack of substance, had there been a competent editor working with the author.

Would you ever listen to anything by Catherine Bailey again?

Probably not - this was such a let down.

How could the performance have been better?

Performance of the reader was good, he just had very little to work with.

What character would you cut from The Secret Rooms: A True Gothic Mystery?

Sadly, character needs to be ADDED in order to make this book more enjoyable.

Any additional comments?

This book is so much NOT what it says it is. I suppose if it was properly titled "Family Letters of English Minor Aristocracy during the early 20th Century" it wouldn't have sold very well.

  • Divergent

  • By: Veronica Roth
  • Narrated by: Emma Galvin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,946
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,530
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,733

In Beatrice Prior's dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue - Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is - she can't have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It's not for me. Loved it anyway.

  • By Grant on 05-24-12

Ugh ... painfully bad

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-12-14

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

I usually like YA fiction, and it's understandable that the writing style and subjects targeting YA readers aren't really intended for an older reader. That said, a lot of the writing in Divergent was just bad, bad, bad... the 'romantic' scenes were especially cliche-packed and awkward - and not in the way that conveys the awkwardness of young emotion, but the awkwardness of poor writing.

Would you ever listen to anything by Veronica Roth again?

I doubt it.

How could the performance have been better?

The performance was fine - it was the material that wasn't to my liking.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Divergent?

An assertive editor would have cut about 40% of the book. It makes me think the material was intentionally 'stretched' to fill (and sell) additional books.

Any additional comments?

No - - this will be a return for me.

  • Swan Song

  • By: Robert R. McCammon
  • Narrated by: Tom Stechschulte
  • Length: 34 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,801
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,035
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,070

Facing down an unprecedented malevolent enemy, the government responds with a nuclear attack. America as it was is gone forever, and now every citizen - from the President of the United States to the homeless on the streets of New York City - will fight for survival. In a wasteland born of rage and fear, populated by monstrous creatures and marauding armies, earth's last survivors have been drawn into the final battle between good and evil, that will decide the fate of humanity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply an Amazing Story

  • By Amanda H. on 06-21-12

Wants to be "The Stand" but ends up crawling

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-13

What disappointed you about Swan Song?

I found this book meandering and frustrating.

I've tried three times to listen to this book. I always get 2-3 hours into it and just can't stand it any more. I'm left with the impression that this is a really bad attempt to weave together a political - scientific thriller with elements of horror and the supernatural, somewhat like Stephen King's The Stand. Unfortunately, I find it a D-rate effort. I've no feeling for the characters experiencing the 'supernatural' aspects of the story - possibly because they only exist to further that part of the plot. If they had been introduced as 'normal' people who then, during the course of events, experience the unexplainable in the midst of a catastrophic nuclear war, they might be interesting. I ended up just wanting to skip any section of the narrative that dealt with these people.

The multiple story-lines also failed - to me - to come together into a whole. It was like this was two or three books mushed together with an attempt to tie them into a cohesive narrative.

I'll try to return this, but since the original purchase was last year, I don't know if I can.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Wolfhound Century by Peter Higgins

What aspect of Tom Stechschulte’s performance would you have changed?

It was fine. I think he tried to give a different voice to each of the many characters.

What character would you cut from Swan Song?

Swan - - Sister Creep and everyone she comes in contact with

Any additional comments?

I think I've said enough

3 of 4 people found this review helpful