LISTENER

Austin Haukinz

Madison
  • 39
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 41
  • ratings
  • Deep Work

  • Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World
  • By: Cal Newport
  • Narrated by: Jeff Bottoms
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,289
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,445
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,388

Deep work is the ability to focus without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It's a skill that allows you to quickly master complicated information and produce better results in less time. Deep work will make you better at what you do and provide the sense of true fulfillment that comes from craftsmanship. In short, deep work is like a superpower in our increasingly competitive 21st-century economy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 1.5x pace

  • By Derek on 05-17-16

Think deep

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

Deep Work is a book on how one can achieve higher quality, more focused work. Although a straightforward concept, there are actually a number of helpful strategies in this read. After the introduction you’ll find recommendations on removing distractions, staying organized, and obtaining deeper levels of concentration. I found a number of these strategies helpful and plan on incorporating them in my day to day. If you’re a developer, artist, or researcher, the concepts in the book are likely to be invaluable.

  • The Swerve

  • How the World Became Modern
  • By: Stephen Greenblatt
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,272
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,983
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,976

Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late 30s took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic by Lucretius—a beautiful poem containing the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Very compelling history, a less compelling thesis

  • By Ethan M. on 05-01-12

The rediscovery of a nearly lost book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

The Swerve is a short history about the recovery of a poem titled ‘On the Nature of Things’. This poem, written around two thousand years ago, presents ideas that the universe operates according to physical principles and not the influence of gods. Greenblatt delicately unfolds the rediscovery of this poem by Poggio in 1417. Thanks to this rediscovery the poem went on to inspire great minds like Galileo and Darwin, and help contribute to the Renaissance.

I loved the juxtaposition of the two time periods, medieval thought dominated by religious dogma verses Ancient Greek Epicureanism which embodies tranquility and the pursuit of happiness. Greenblatt wonderfully weaves the histories of the two together. Although the title is a bit overarching (how the world became modern), I definitely enjoyed this book and learned a great deal. If you’re into history give this one a listen.

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

  • Light Falls

  • Space, Time, and an Obsession of Einstein
  • By: Brian Greene
  • Narrated by: Brian Greene, Paul Rudd, Peter Ganim, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,425
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,232
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,231

Best-selling author, superstar physicist, and cofounder of the World Science Festival Brian Greene (The Elegant Universe, The Fabric of the Cosmos) and an ensemble cast led by award-winning actor Paul Rudd (Ant-Man) perform this dramatic story tracing Albert Einstein's discovery of the general theory of relativity.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An enjoyable deviation from standard Non-Fiction

  • By Heath N. Threm on 10-25-16

Beautifully produced

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

Light Falls is a beautiful, full-cast production of the life of Einstein. Entertaining through and through. Also, a quick listen. I definitely recommend.

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Make It Stick

  • The Science of Successful Learning
  • By: Peter C. Brown
  • Narrated by: Qarie Marshall
  • Length: 8 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,328
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,880
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,839

To most of us, learning something 'the hard way' implies wasted time and effort. Good teaching, we believe, should be creatively tailored to the different learning styles of students and should use strategies that make learning easier. Make It Stick turns fashionable ideas like these on their head and will appeal to all those interested in the challenge of lifelong learning and self-improvement.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO KNOW HOW TO LEARN

  • By ANDRÉ on 11-22-14

Learn the science of learning

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

Make it Stick is a book about effective learning/teaching habits. Brown’s main idea is we need to focus much more on knowledge retrieval and not retention. Brown masterfully presents this information through numerous stories and studies, busting myths and giving concrete examples to try. Teachers, students, trainers, or really anyone interested in self-development should absolutely give this a read.

AUDIBLE 20 REVIEW SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Guantánamo Diary

  • By: Mohamedou Ould Slahi
  • Narrated by: Peter Ganim
  • Length: 14 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 205
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 184
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185

Since 2002, Mohamedou Slahi has been imprisoned at the detention camp at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. In all these years, the United States has never charged him with a crime. A federal judge ordered his release in March 2010, but the U.S. government fought that decision, and there is no sign that the United States plans to let him go.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely amazing!

  • By abraham caballero on 04-07-15

Incredible!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

I honestly can't believe what I just listened to. Guantánamo Diary is the actual diary of Mohamedou Ould Slahi, written during the first few years of his time at Guantánamo Bay. This diary was obtained via the freedom of information act and later edited with footnotes by the writer Larry Siems. I found the presentation of this text fascinating. I loved how the redacted text still remains so you get a feeling of scale and context. The footnotes are well written and either corroborate or provide essential details to Mohamedou's story.

Guantánamo Diary shows you the person behind these words. Whether this person committed crimes or not, this is a human like all of us. This book also shows how important our court process is. We cannot allow individuals to be tortured or indefinitely imprisoned.

This listen is important as it is fascinating. I can't recommend this one enough.

  • Evicted

  • Poverty and Profit in the American City
  • By: Matthew Desmond
  • Narrated by: Dion Graham
  • Length: 11 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,017
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,719
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,715

In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Former Property Manager

  • By Charla on 05-18-16

Incredible!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

Evicted showcases the housing crisis that is fueling poverty, inequality, and nearly every other social issue plaguing America today. Matthew Desmond vividly captures the painfully complex issues of low income housing through the eyes of tenants and landlords.

I wish I could give this book ten stars. Not only is this an incredibly well researched and beautifully presented book, it's exceptionally important. Evicted should be a required read for every American.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Notes of a Native Son

  • By: James Baldwin
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 5 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 529
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477

Written during the 1940s and early 1950s, when Baldwin was only in his twenties, the essays collected in Notes of a Native Son capture a view of black life and black thought at the dawn of the civil rights movement and as the movement slowly gained strength through the words of one of the most captivating essayists and foremost intellectuals of that era.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Masterful Essayist

  • By Andre on 09-30-16

Powerful Prose

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

Notes of a Native Son is a collection of essays written by Baldwin in the 40's and 50's. This read has the same powerful prose that one expects in a book from Baldwin. Eye opening and impressively relevant. Although not my favorite book from Baldwin, still a good read.

  • First They Killed My Father

  • A Daughter of Cambodia Remembers
  • By: Loung Ung
  • Narrated by: Tavia Gilbert
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 592
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 542
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 542

One of seven children of a high-ranking government official, Loung Ung lived a privileged life in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh until the age of five. Then, in April 1975, Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge army stormed into the city, forcing Ung's family to flee and, eventually, to disperse. Loung was trained as a child soldier in a work camp for orphans, her siblings were sent to labor camps, and those who survived the horrors would not be reunited until the Khmer Rouge was destroyed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An eye-opening look into an unknown world

  • By Daryl on 07-31-12

Important History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-17

First They Killed My Father is a personal account of the horrific genocide carried out by the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia from 1975 to 1979. A truly eye-opening story that brings to focus this important moment of history.

I personally loved Ung's writing style. She describes so vividly everything from her emotions to the landscape around her. Also, I think she successfully portrays her reaction to these terrible events, given this story starts when she is only 5 years old. I simply can't imagine going though everything she did, plus at such a young age.

I hands down recommend this read. It's gripping as it is heartbreaking, not to mention it's dripping with historical importance.

  • Being Mortal

  • Medicine and What Matters in the End
  • By: Atul Gawande
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 9 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,366
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,459
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,448

In Being Mortal, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending. Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury, and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required Reading!

  • By Jeffrey on 10-13-14

Grim but important and inspiring

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

Wow, what a book. Being Mortal tackles the not so light topic of how we handle aging and dying. Gawande waves this narrative through numerous personal stories of those dealing with old age and declining health. Medicine so often only focuses on extending life as long as possible. Gawande however passionately advocates for a more holistic approach. A focus on individual well-being, not just more time to live. All said and done, I'm not sure if I was ready for this one. The stories were sad and the topics were grim. But, looking back, I'm incredibly glad to have made it through. It's only a matter of time until these topics become incredibly relevant, and I now feel so much more prepared.

  • The Book Thief

  • By: Markus Zusak
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,328
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,298
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,336

It's just a small story really, about, among other things, a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist: books.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glad I took a chance.

  • By Robert on 08-20-11

Fantastic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-17

I can see why so many people love this book. The story follows a young girl in Germany during WWII. It has your standard coming of age elements, but so much more. I personally loved the expressive characters. From Rosa to Max to the narrator. I mean, just listen to these:

"So much good, so much evil. Just add water."

"Saukerl! Lick my ass!"

"Humans, if nothing else, have a good sense to die"

If you get a chance, give this a listen. Plus the narration is fantastic. I promise, you'll laugh, you'll shed a tear, and you might even gain some insight to humanity. You just won't be let down.