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  • Silent Child

  • Audible's Thriller of 2017
  • By: Sarah A. Denzil
  • Narrated by: Joanne Froggatt
  • Length: 9 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,712
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,873
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,829

In the summer of 2006, Emma Price watched helplessly as her six-year-old son's red coat was fished out of the River Ouse. It was the tragic story of the year - a little boy, Aiden, wandered away from school during a terrible flood, fell into the river, and drowned. His body was never recovered. Ten years later Emma has finally rediscovered the joy in life...until Aiden returns.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Slowest "Thriller" Ever

  • By Kierstin L Hartwig on 10-18-18

Sadly, easy to solve

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-17

Was looking forward to this one, had such great reviews. Was so easy to solve and not as well written as I hoped. I do like the narrator, but the story was just so so.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Underground Railroad (Oprah's Book Club)

  • A Novel
  • By: Colson Whitehead
  • Narrated by: Bahni Turpin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,324
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,327
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,293

The Newest Oprah Book Club 2016 Selection. Cora is a slave on a cotton plantation in Georgia. Life is hell for all the slaves but especially bad for Cora; an outcast even among her fellow Africans, she is coming into womanhood - where even greater pain awaits. When Caesar, a recent arrival from Virginia, tells her about the Underground Railroad, they decide to take a terrifying risk and escape. Matters do not go as planned - Cora kills a young white boy who tries to capture her. Though they manage to find a station and head north, they are being hunted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupendous book, hard to follow in audio

  • By JQR on 12-01-16

Strong in academics, Weak in story

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-17

I really wish that the metaphorical use of an actual railroad being underground wasn't used as often as it was in this novel. It really took me out of the story because of it's implausibility. With that said, so much of what is covered in this book is valuable to every American to read. My teenage son is studying exactly what is being told in this story at school at this time, so it made for interesting conversation and comparisons as to what is actually covered and what isn't in our American History classes. What struck both of us is how differently so many of our states handled the horrors of slavery, the reaction of the north and south to the Fugitive Slave Acts,--a true learning lesson and perhaps why some of the states we live in today still bear the scars and lessons of life before the Civil War. For some reason, the story felt more like a tool as well, teaching as it went, instead of immersing us completely. Overall good, but not as moving and strong as I had hoped.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132,900
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,363
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117,238

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Psychological Thriller Mystery

  • By Victor @ theAudiobookBlog on 01-23-18

More believable than Gone Girl

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-22-15

Is there anything you would change about this book?

It became obvious who did it about 3/4 of the way through, but was fun up to that point.

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

The least interesting was the character whodunit...strange as that may seem. The most interesting aspect is how each of the female characters are unhappy as wives...definitely a theme going on there.

What about the narrators’s performance did you like?

Always able to tell which character was speaking.

Was The Girl on the Train worth the listening time?

Yes, fun-certainly not a serious read, but fun.

  • We Are Not Ourselves

  • By: Matthew Thomas
  • Narrated by: Mare Winningham
  • Length: 20 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,108
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 982
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 981

Born in 1941, Eileen Tumulty is raised by her Irish immigrant parents in Woodside, Queens, in an apartment where the mood swings between heartbreak and hilarity, depending on whether guests are over and how much alcohol has been consumed. When Eileen meets Ed Leary, a scientist whose bearing is nothing like those of the men she grew up with, she thinks she’s found the perfect partner to deliver her to the cosmopolitan world she longs to inhabit.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Beyond Depressing

  • By Emily Yolkut on 01-12-15

i never wanted it to end

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-15

If you could sum up We Are Not Ourselves in three words, what would they be?

very thought provoking

Who was your favorite character and why?

Eileen. Her strength in all situations, having to grow up so quickly, her work ethic, her perseverance.

Have you listened to any of Mare Winningham’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Not that I can rememember.

Who was the most memorable character of We Are Not Ourselves and why?

Ed...his descent into losing his memory.

Any additional comments?

I have listened and read so very many books in this last year and I cant remember one that has stayed with me as long as this one has.

(Spoiler alert)The topic of Alzheimers is interesting to me as I am aging, and those around me are dealing with it within their families. But, it wasn't just that. It was the family dynamic between the main character Eileen, her husband Ed, and her son Collen(spelling?).

This book is so well written. As you enter the world of each character through the author's telling, and then hear about it, in the same way through another characters interpretation of the same- you realize, or at least remember, how different everyone's experience is in a family.

We are Not Ourselves follows the life of a woman and man, through their ups and downs, and their disappointments with each other. They have a boy, and they extend those circumstances as we all do in the raising of this child.

Before the characters in the story do, we begin to realize that something is wrong with Ed, and, well...that it is his mind--this most cherished part of his intellectual life.

What follows is such in incredible narrative of his descent, and the effect it has on all who surround him.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful