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  • Writing Deep Point of View

  • Professional Techniques for Fiction Authors (Writer's Craft, Book 13)
  • By: Rayne Hall
  • Narrated by: Cat Lookabaugh
  • Length: 2 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 58
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 54
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53

In this book, I'll reveal the powerful techniques employed by best-selling authors, and I'll show you how to apply them to rivet your readers. I'll start with the basics of Point of View - if you're already familiar with the concept, you can treat them as a refresher - and then guide you to advanced strategies for taking your reader deep.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Slipping into someone else's skin

  • By Michael on 09-05-16

Worth a read. If listening, take notes. Lots of info

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-18

Great info in a short book. Helped me identify a few areas in my text that felt off and (most importantly) instructed me on several ways to fix the issue. Lots of craft books explain what to do and what not to and do and why. Sometimes it helps to know How to change it.

My only reason for not giving this a perfect score is that it’s already short and the last 20-30 minutes are spent listening to some of the author’s fiction. The fictional story was not of interest to me. (Not my kind of read) There’s no further instruction, so I sped through it, bored. The narration is good for non-fiction, but not great at making me listen to a story at the end. I’m not in that headspace when looking for solutions to my problems. Ending on that note affected my rating as it created a bit of dissatisfaction/irritation. Overall, the good far out-weighs this.... Lots of great tips here.

  • Nice Girls Don't Date Dead Men

  • Half-Moon Hollow, Book 2
  • By: Molly Harper
  • Narrated by: Amanda Ronconi
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,057
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,046
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,031

Once a devoted children's librarian, Jane Jameson now works at a rundown occult bookstore. Once a regular gal, she's now a vampire. And instead of a bride, she's an eternal bridesmaid -- which leads her to question where exactly her relationship with her irresistibly sexy sire, Gabriel, is headed. Mercurial, enigmatic, apparently commitment-phobic vampires are nothing if not hard to read.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great series!

  • By Amy on 08-28-10

Could have been 1/3 as long

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-17

Same great characters. Still funny. I still find the awkward semi-violent sex to be more quirky and confusing than hot. My main issue with this book was the pace dragged. I felt like we heard the main character reassure the bride and everyone else that the groom wasn't in love with her Way too many times. It just seemed like some scenes were dragging things out. Even all of the in-law drama just wore thin to the point of annoyance versus enjoyable. The mystery elements of these stories are easy to guess ahead of time so more variety is needed in the obstacles before we reach the inevitable reveal/conclusion. The preview for the 3rd book sounds good and back on track. I'm going to keep reading because I like the characters and the world this author has created. Crossing my fingers that the next one is better.

  • Nice Girls Don't Have Fangs

  • Half-Moon Hollow, Book 1
  • By: Molly Harper
  • Narrated by: Amanda Ronconi
  • Length: 8 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,152
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,643
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 7,655

Maybe it was the Shenanigans gift certificate that put her over the edge. When children's librarian and self-professed nice girl Jane Jameson is fired by her beastly boss and handed $25 in potato skins instead of a severance check, she goes on a bender that's sure to become Half Moon Hollow legend. On her way home, she's mistaken for a deer, shot, and left for dead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Refreshing take on the Paranormal Genre

  • By Captain Skurvy on 02-21-10

Funny, interesting, not super steamy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-17

A fun listen. Humor, interesting characters, and a solid story. The sex scenes aren't really for me but there aren't many and are fairly short. I just didn't think the main character seemed the type to jump right into a rough experience based on her history. It's a small issue because I'm not reading for "steam."

  • Theft of Swords

  • Riyria Revelations, Volume 1
  • By: Michael J. Sullivan
  • Narrated by: Tim Gerard Reynolds
  • Length: 22 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,226
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,752
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,731

Acclaimed author Michael J. Sullivan created instant best sellers with his spellbinding Riyria Revelations series. This first volume introduces Royce Melborn and Hadrian Blackwater, two enterprising thieves who end up running for their lives when they’re framed for the death of the king. Trapped in a conspiracy bigger than they can imagine, their only hope is unraveling an ancient mystery - before it’s too late.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A GOOD START TO A SERIES

  • By Randall on 12-24-18

The Fantasy Falls Flat Without a Sense of Wonder

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-30-16

Would you recommend Theft of Swords to your friends? Why or why not?

No. I'm not an expert but I read a lot of fantasy. This was a frustrating experience. The characters, setting and plot are good. The dialogue makes me want to throw something. If the other components of the story weren't as strong, I'd give this book 2 stars.

There are times when a character translates what another character says in case we're not smart enough to understand words with more than 2 syllables. There are several times when the characters sum up what's happening to each other in case we missed it. This is insulting to the reader.

The author uses the plot device of having a character conveniently well-versed in random facts fill us in on lots of details to push the story forward so we don't get to feel like we're discovering things. This is a huge part of the experience of this genre.

These feel like rookie mistakes. It's perplexing because so many other aspects of the story are really good with tons of potential. At one point, the book says a comment is made by a character who isn't even In that scene.

There's no sense of wonder in this book. The fantasy reader wants a moment to feel some wonder or intrigue about the story, but, in this book, it's spelled out quickly.

Do you think Theft of Swords needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

I could not possibly go through another book written this way.

  • Fool Moon

  • The Dresden Files, Book 2
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 10 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,710
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,673
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,622

Harry Blackstone Copperfield Dresden is Chicago's only openly practicing wizard. He is also dead broke. His vast knowledge and magical skills are unfortunately matched by his talent for making powerful enemies and alienating friends. With little more than his integrity left, he accepts an offer of work from Lt. Karin Murphy of Chicago's Special Investigations Unit. He wants to redeem himself in Murphy's eyes and make enough money to quiet his rumbling stomach.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best books I've read in a long time!

  • By David Ziegler on 05-06-10

Meh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-27-15

There were a lot of characters in this one that blended together. I wasn't overly invested in their outcome. I kept falling asleep toward the end when everything is supposed to be exciting.

  • The Warded Man

  • By: Peter V. Brett
  • Narrated by: Pete Bradbury
  • Length: 18 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,924
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,749
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,772

Peter V. Brett has won accolades from critics, fans and fellow authors alike for this riveting debut novel. The Warded Man features a world where demons stalk the night, hunting humans who have long forgotten the magic of their ancestors. But all is not lost, as some hold out hope that a savior will release humanity from the demons' terrifying reign.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant

  • By Meloney | The Interverted Extravert on 12-18-09

Honestly...I'm conflicted

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-15

Would you consider the audio edition of The Warded Man to be better than the print version?

Perhaps when something is printed, you are less likely to notice the repetitive nature of the character being called "The Warded Man" in every sentence toward the end of the novel. When you hear it, it grates on your ear a bit. The Warded Man walked five steps to the left. The Warded Man looked at her side-ways. She regarded THE WARDED MAN thoughtfully. The Warded Man said, " Good luck." She responded "And to you as well, Warded Man." Ok that's not how it goes but it starts to sound that way. This issue isn't unique to this particular book. I hear it in some of the most popular writing today. It's just so much more obvious when you hear it out loud.

Would you be willing to try another book from Peter V. Brett? Why or why not?

I might. Writing any book is Hard. The first book in a series involves a lot of establishing the characters. He does this well. I hate to critique a writer because it's not like I'm an expert. I've never written anything. But, there's over 18 hours to listen to in this book. The major characters come together after 16-17 hours. When they do, suddenly, it seems as though the author said "well I'm tired. Let's just wrap this up, shall we?!" That's a LOT of groundwork and time invested for very little pay off. I'm telling you this as a person who listened to the *Entire* Wheel of Time series by Jordan/Sanderson. I'm conflicted because what Brett does in more than 3/4 of the book is good. He just drops the ball in terms of writing a really good, descriptive and engaging fight scene or giving much detail once the characters are FINALLY in each other's presence. And... I don't want to throw any spoilers in here but he might want to chat with a few women when he writes about how one typically responds to specific physical experiences. Unless these responses are all part of his world-building and women in his world have different physiology and psychology than women on Earth. This criticism, by no means, indicates that his work is without merit. He just needed an outside opinion about a couple of things to improve the book.

Which scene was your favorite?

I thought all of his descriptions of various family dynamics were great. He has several rich characters. His origin stories of the 3 major characters are very good. All of the various training scenes, exploration scenes, moments when these characters took risks---all of those were rewarding to read. One particularly well written moment is when a character is conflicted about someone who raised them for years but initially was a major jerk that cost him the lives of those closest to him... That was so very true to life. It's hard to compartmentalize such equal and opposite emotions about 1 person. I also appreciated that the author chose to write a person who could be seen as disabled actually having plenty to offer regardless of physics limitations.

If you could rename The Warded Man, what would you call it?

The Mark of Demons

Any additional comments?

I didn't give this full stars for 1 reason only: The last 1-2 hours. Those were rushed. It's as though someone suggested he edit for length so he went back to the last few chapters and stripped out the details to meet some sort of requirement. Bottom line when writing: Don't skimp out at the end. Don't fast forward and try to make readers fill in the missing bit of character development under the guise of being mysterious. The readers of this genre are tired of that plot device now. After investing so much time, I feel a bit ripped off at the end. It's not a Total disappointment but it could have been SO MUCH Better.

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