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D. Finlayson

San Antonio, Texas
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  • 1
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  • 3
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  • The Invisible History of the Human Race

  • How DNA and History Shape Our Identities and Our Futures
  • By: Christine Kenneally
  • Narrated by: Justine Eyre
  • Length: 12 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 165
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 145
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 145

In The Invisible History of the Human Race, Christine Kenneally draws on cutting-edge research to reveal how both historical artifacts and DNA tell us where we come from and where we may be going. While some books explore our genetic inheritance and some popular television shows celebrate ancestry, this is the first book to explore how everything from DNA to emotions to names and the stories that form our lives are all part of our human legacy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Who are you really. Who am I?

  • By Annie M. on 10-28-14

DNA continues to facinate.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-18-14

If you could sum up The Invisible History of the Human Race in three words, what would they be?

DNA is History

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Invisible History of the Human Race?

The most memorable moment of the book was following the DNA out of Africa. The book carefully lays a foundation for understanding DNA and how it can be an effective marker for the historical migrations of mankind. Then, it moves, as it must, into the tricky area of DNA and race. Although the vast majority of human DNA is identical, there are some small markers that show us race. And, tracing the movements of men through the race markers is fascinating. It is also unsettling because, the use of race based DNA, in the wrong hands, could be used to discriminate. What if Hitler had the genetic means to determine whether a person was "Aryan?"

What about Justine Eyre’s performance did you like?

Justine Eyre is excellent. Her diction is so precise, I was able to speed up the performance and hear the book - fast.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

n/a

Any additional comments?

I was surprised and I was educated by this book. Recommended for all adults.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Dallas 1963

  • Patriots, Traitors, and the Assassination of JFK
  • By: Bill Minutaglio, Steven L. Davis
  • Narrated by: Bill Minutaglio, Tony Messano, Steven L. Davis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 36
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35

In the months and weeks before the fateful November 22nd, 1963, Dallas was brewing with political passions, a city crammed with larger-than-life characters dead-set against the Kennedy presidency. These included rabid warriors like defrocked military general Edwin A. Walker; the world's richest oil baron, H. L. Hunt; the leader of the largest Baptist congregation in the world, W.A. Criswell; and the media mogul Ted Dealey, who raucously confronted JFK and whose family name adorns the plaza where the president was murdered.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Today's headlines ripped straight from this story

  • By AMF on 09-17-17

Dallas History Informs Today's Right Wing Politics

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-19-14

Would you consider the audio edition of Dallas 1963 to be better than the print version?

The audible version of this book really works. Facinating subject. And easy to follow.
It's uncanny how the guiding principles of the John Birch Society and the right wing in Dallas (known at that time as "The City of Hate") are so similar to the current philosophy of the Tea Party.
I lived in Dallas in 1963 and knew many of the players discussed in the book. Every fact, every tidbit, is accurate. It all fits with my memory and knowledge of the tragedy.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Stanley Marcus - a true, blue hero. He understood the good in Dallas and worked to lift the city to a more cosmopolitan level.

Which scene was your favorite?

The Kennedy motorcade. Every whisper of air, the positions of all the people were beautifully described. The detail of the minute by minute description was a work of art.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The assassination, of course. I cried when I listened to the description. But, I was also impressed, even moved, by the life of Marina Oswald. Her life with Lee Oswald is fully fleshed out for some understanding of his motivation and pathology.

Any additional comments?

I recommend this book to all of my friends and family from Dallas. Fifty years later, unbelievably, the events are being forgotten. Because we live with the legacy of these events, it's important to be reminded of them lest history repeats.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful